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Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Old Mar 12th 2009, 3:24 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by Kapri
Hi folks

I spent 2 years researching Australia and was almost at the end of the visa apllication when family circumstances meant I had to drop it. My OH told me he was relieved, that he hadn't really wanted to go at all.
He is quite right when he says it would be financial madness. Although, as a nurse, I would be fine for work his job doesn't transfer and he would have to pick up unskilled work or spend at least 2 years retraining. i would also have to take a step back in my career.
Despite all this I can't stop thinking about going. I feel that even if we ended up coming back at least we would have had the experience. He is adamant that it would leave us broke (it would!)and therefore is a risk not worth taking.
I think I'm mad for still thinking about Australia ....but I can't help it
As people who have emigrated then returned what are your thoughts?

This might be an interesting exercise. What's your perception of Australia from where you are at the moment? What draws you to it? We can perhaps act as a mirror for you.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 3:36 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Just found this link which might be worth a read too. It suggests that record numbers of Brits are emigrating for a variety of reasons, quality of life seems to be the main reason along with costs.
However, I live on the Gold Coast and I can say it's definitely not cheaper to live here. Food is expensive and so are utility bills while Broadband is ridiculous.
It's also extremely hot in summer and just the heat can be very debilitating so although heating bills might cost in the UK, you can pay big bills here for air conditioning.
But......one good thing about Oz is that the cities are modern and noticably clean. I hate the urban decay in Britain and as they are now printing money, I'm guessing that cleaning up won't be high on the agenda.

You do need some money whether you're coming or going. Without money, it's tough. Hope this helps anyway.

http://www.visabureau.com/australia/...australia.aspx
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 5:05 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by cricket1
Just found this link which might be worth a read too. It suggests that record numbers of Brits are emigrating for a variety of reasons, quality of life seems to be the main reason along with costs.
However, I live on the Gold Coast and I can say it's definitely not cheaper to live here. Food is expensive and so are utility bills while Broadband is ridiculous.
It's also extremely hot in summer and just the heat can be very debilitating so although heating bills might cost in the UK, you can pay big bills here for air conditioning.
But......one good thing about Oz is that the cities are modern and noticably clean. I hate the urban decay in Britain and as they are now printing money, I'm guessing that cleaning up won't be high on the agenda.

You do need some money whether you're coming or going. Without money, it's tough. Hope this helps anyway.

http://www.visabureau.com/australia/...australia.aspx
Maybe have a look in your own backyard to see if you can make any changes in your day to day life first, before committing to moving abroad.

As Cricket says, "what draws you to Australia?". For me, it was being fed up with the rat race, wanting a different experience and a little bit of wanderlust thrown in for good measure. Well I got the different experience, but you can go on holiday to do that and it won't cost you a fortune, your job and the domestic disruption. As for my wanderlust, well that has been well and truly sated. Life is a lot less stressful here, but I could have changed that without crossing the globe.

I'm not back home yet, and I don't need to be to know that I regret moving in the first place - if that makes sense!

Had I been a 'ten pound pom' then I think returning to England after 12 months wouldn't have been an option. Most of them wouldn't have had the resources back then to just up and leave Aus if they didn't like it, and instead would have had to get on with forging a future here.

It's very different now, as there are many who come here, simply because they can. They can easily dip their toe in to test the water first, safe in the knowledge that it can be withdrawn if needed - which can be destructive in itself.

I think unless you're 100% committed to making Australia your home, and for the right reasons, then stay where you are.

Having said all this though, the "what if.........." which nags at the back of the mind, maybe to hard to ignore.

Good luck!
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 5:32 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by cricket1
Just found this link which might be worth a read too. It suggests that record numbers of Brits are emigrating for a variety of reasons, quality of life seems to be the main reason along with costs.
However, I live on the Gold Coast and I can say it's definitely not cheaper to live here. Food is expensive and so are utility bills while Broadband is ridiculous.
It's also extremely hot in summer and just the heat can be very debilitating so although heating bills might cost in the UK, you can pay big bills here for air conditioning.
But......one good thing about Oz is that the cities are modern and noticably clean. I hate the urban decay in Britain and as they are now printing money, I'm guessing that cleaning up won't be high on the agenda.

You do need some money whether you're coming or going. Without money, it's tough. Hope this helps anyway.

http://www.visabureau.com/australia/...australia.aspx
Sorry Cricket, the reply was for Kapri.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 5:49 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Agree with the above posts. Also, when we moved to Sydney after decades on the Gold Coast, I nearly fell over when went grocery shopping on arrival in Sydney. Bought the same items, yet in Sydney, I was paying close to a third more for them. Everything here is more expensive than in Queensland: stamp duty when we purchased a home, car rego, utilities bills, etc.

However, when we spent a few weeks on the Gold Coast recently, with an eye to buying something up there again, we noticed the Coast seems to have followed the capital cities and was on a par with Sydney prices as far as groceries and other items was concerned. I have my own theories about what's going on, but this isn't the forum for them.

The truth is, if someone is living comfortably in the UK, then they'll very probably have the resources to live comfortably in Australia. But, for those who're really struggling in the UK and therefore don't have much to bring to Oz, then they'll very probably struggle here, too.

I know that's not what those considering emigrating want to hear, but better to hear it before you move than after.

Long-term Aussies have been scratching their heads re: the alleged 'skills shortages' the government has been waffling on about for years as justification for bringing in more Asian and African unskilled migrants. What sort of 'skills shortage' situation can exist simultaneous with loads of long-term unemployed Aussies ?

The fact is, the Aussie government (controlled as it is by zionists abroad) wants to ramp up the Australian population by fair means or foul.

The banks have been dumping very experienced Aussie staff for years, under one guise after another, after which they've filled those places with Chinese and Indians. Customers have definitely felt the difference and few have felt it's been for the better.

In the past ten years, Aussies have had to become accustomed to a huge reduction in experienced Aussie supermarket employees, who've been replaced almost entirely by Indians. Again, the average Aussie preferred things the way they were. And ask: ' Why did this happen? Why doesn't Australia put it's own first ? '

So in other words, in my observation, there's been a concerted campaign to make Aussies redundant, in order to justify bringing in overseas migrants from the sub-continent and China -- most of whom have/had language difficulties and who are/were not skilled.

A lot of those Aussies forced from their jobs are/were unable (for all the above reasons) to find similar work elsewhere and become 'long term unemployed' and have been shuffled from one version of welfare to the next in order to fudge the unemployment figures. Many in their late 40s and in their 50s know they will never work again, unless they sell the house and 'buy themselves a job' i.e. open a small business knowing (because the government advises them so) that a small business goes broke, on average, every 11 minutes in Australia (at least I think that's the rule of thumb).

Australia continues to advertise in Britain, claiming there are loads of positions vacant in Australia which due to the 'skills shortage', cannot be filled by Aussies. But basically, it would appear there is substantial voter backlash at the huge number of non-English speaking unskilled migrants being brought into the country, which they periodically pretend to address by allowing UK migrants in. But it seems to me that Brit migrants are made by the Aussie government to jump through hoops of fire in order to get into Australia, while at the same time, unskilled Asians and Africans are brought in under the auspices of 'front' charitable and church organisations, behind which lurk the Usual Suspects.

Trust me .... Aussies would be happy to see millions of Brits come to Australia, to balance out the millions of non-english speaking, unskilled foreign migrant numbers ! Yes ... we would love to see a lot more Brits in Australia ! (this despite all the research showed, 20 years ago, that the maximum sustainable population in this land was 13 million). But ... as the puppet Aussie government seems hell-bent on creating water and resource shortages through unsustainable population numbers .. then the average Aussie would vote for Brit migrants every time.

At the same time, no Aussie would willingly advise a struggling Brit family to lay their futures, their peace of mind and every cent they possess on the line, if Australia cannot offer them at least a basic job and a basic home. No-one with any conscience would do that. Yet the Austraian government seems to be doing it.

For anyone considering moving to Australia -- do your research. Force yourself to look at the real picture. Listen to those who're trying to warn you. They're not doing it and risking making themselves unpopular in here for the fun of it. They don't gain anything from it. They're trying to save you from pain.

The Aussie government, like virtually every other government, does not tell the truth when it comes to unemployment. They juggle the figures. They put people on various welfare and training schemes as a way of eliminating them from the unemployment statistics. Yes, the Aussie government will lie to you. Those who live here and who are struggling or who have struggled can be relied upon far more than the Aussie government.

So don't see what you want to see when you research Australia. Stare the truth in the face. Consider the worst possible scenario and ask yourself if you can deal with that and if so, then sure, proceed. But 'living a dream', 'having an adventure' or 'seeking better lifestyle' will feel like ashes in your mouth if you can't put a roof over your family's heads or feed your children. And the beach will be precious little consolation for humiliation, hunger, desperation, and the feel of only a handful of change in your pocket at Christmas.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 7:04 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by folic
Agree with the above posts. Also, when we moved to Sydney after decades on the Gold Coast, I nearly fell over when went grocery shopping on arrival in Sydney. Bought the same items, yet in Sydney, I was paying close to a third more for them. Everything here is more expensive than in Queensland: stamp duty when we purchased a home, car rego, utilities bills, etc.

However, when we spent a few weeks on the Gold Coast recently, with an eye to buying something up there again, we noticed the Coast seems to have followed the capital cities and was on a par with Sydney prices as far as groceries and other items was concerned. I have my own theories about what's going on, but this isn't the forum for them.

The truth is, if someone is living comfortably in the UK, then they'll very probably have the resources to live comfortably in Australia. But, for those who're really struggling in the UK and therefore don't have much to bring to Oz, then they'll very probably struggle here, too.

I know that's not what those considering emigrating want to hear, but better to hear it before you move than after.

Long-term Aussies have been scratching their heads re: the alleged 'skills shortages' the government has been waffling on about for years as justification for bringing in more Asian and African unskilled migrants. What sort of 'skills shortage' situation can exist simultaneous with loads of long-term unemployed Aussies ?

The fact is, the Aussie government (controlled as it is by zionists abroad) wants to ramp up the Australian population by fair means or foul.

The banks have been dumping very experienced Aussie staff for years, under one guise after another, after which they've filled those places with Chinese and Indians. Customers have definitely felt the difference and few have felt it's been for the better.

In the past ten years, Aussies have had to become accustomed to a huge reduction in experienced Aussie supermarket employees, who've been replaced almost entirely by Indians. Again, the average Aussie preferred things the way they were. And ask: ' Why did this happen? Why doesn't Australia put it's own first ? '

So in other words, in my observation, there's been a concerted campaign to make Aussies redundant, in order to justify bringing in overseas migrants from the sub-continent and China -- most of whom have/had language difficulties and who are/were not skilled.

A lot of those Aussies forced from their jobs are/were unable (for all the above reasons) to find similar work elsewhere and become 'long term unemployed' and have been shuffled from one version of welfare to the next in order to fudge the unemployment figures. Many in their late 40s and in their 50s know they will never work again, unless they sell the house and 'buy themselves a job' i.e. open a small business knowing (because the government advises them so) that a small business goes broke, on average, every 11 minutes in Australia (at least I think that's the rule of thumb).

Australia continues to advertise in Britain, claiming there are loads of positions vacant in Australia which due to the 'skills shortage', cannot be filled by Aussies. But basically, it would appear there is substantial voter backlash at the huge number of non-English speaking unskilled migrants being brought into the country, which they periodically pretend to address by allowing UK migrants in. But it seems to me that Brit migrants are made by the Aussie government to jump through hoops of fire in order to get into Australia, while at the same time, unskilled Asians and Africans are brought in under the auspices of 'front' charitable and church organisations, behind which lurk the Usual Suspects.

Trust me .... Aussies would be happy to see millions of Brits come to Australia, to balance out the millions of non-english speaking, unskilled foreign migrant numbers ! Yes ... we would love to see a lot more Brits in Australia ! (this despite all the research showed, 20 years ago, that the maximum sustainable population in this land was 13 million). But ... as the puppet Aussie government seems hell-bent on creating water and resource shortages through unsustainable population numbers .. then the average Aussie would vote for Brit migrants every time.

At the same time, no Aussie would willingly advise a struggling Brit family to lay their futures, their peace of mind and every cent they possess on the line, if Australia cannot offer them at least a basic job and a basic home. No-one with any conscience would do that. Yet the Austraian government seems to be doing it.

For anyone considering moving to Australia -- do your research. Force yourself to look at the real picture. Listen to those who're trying to warn you. They're not doing it and risking making themselves unpopular in here for the fun of it. They don't gain anything from it. They're trying to save you from pain.

The Aussie government, like virtually every other government, does not tell the truth when it comes to unemployment. They juggle the figures. They put people on various welfare and training schemes as a way of eliminating them from the unemployment statistics. Yes, the Aussie government will lie to you. Those who live here and who are struggling or who have struggled can be relied upon far more than the Aussie government.

So don't see what you want to see when you research Australia. Stare the truth in the face. Consider the worst possible scenario and ask yourself if you can deal with that and if so, then sure, proceed. But 'living a dream', 'having an adventure' or 'seeking better lifestyle' will feel like ashes in your mouth if you can't put a roof over your family's heads or feed your children. And the beach will be precious little consolation for humiliation, hunger, desperation, and the feel of only a handful of change in your pocket at Christmas.

It is so true what you say, we were made to jump through so many hoops they even made my other half & I do the english test to get the visa - we are British be it we live in Scotland - dont know what they think we speak in scotland!!! Further to the comment above I have been horrified at the level of violence - I thought the uk was bad but did not look into it at all & it has just been disclosed that the Victorian police hid the true crime levels even if I had thought to look into it.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 7:38 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by kitty2
It is so true what you say, we were made to jump through so many hoops they even made my other half & I do the english test to get the visa - we are British be it we live in Scotland - dont know what they think we speak in scotland!!! Further to the comment above I have been horrified at the level of violence - I thought the uk was bad but did not look into it at all & it has just been disclosed that the Victorian police hid the true crime levels even if I had thought to look into it.

For years, Melbourne was ranked 3rd most dangerous city in the world, according to the media -- or maybe it was 'the' most dangerous. You don't hear much about it now and those not living with the situation are largely unaware of the migrant-generated crime there, currently. I was shocked to learn in a forum the other day, the extent of violence connected with recently-arrived Africans and of the lenient (insanely lenient in the opinion of those discussing it) sentence imposed by a judge who apparently justified the lenience by claiming that as the offender had grown up in an extremely violent (murderous) environment overseas, he could not be expected to understand the lesser violence in Australia. So there's the 'one rule for some' situation out in the open.

The Aussie media is owned by the same people who control Aussie politicians (who own those politicians, basically). And Australia is said to have the most monopolistic media in the world (print, televised, etc). Even the supposedly 'independent' little local rags are actually owned by the same media 'barons' (world and opinion shapers). So, they pump out the trivia, the latest underwear fashion shows by Kylie and the love lives of sports stars .. lots of sport. News .. time it: seven to ten minutes on average, followed by sports, sports, sports 'news' and then the weather, all chock a block filled with commercials, followed by more 'current affairs' beat-ups to get the public's blood boiling about 'single mothers' or 'welfare cheats' .. and to take their minds off the shocking state of public transport, failure to create more dams and failure to haul in the robber-baron supermarket chains who're ripping off Aussie farmers. And gee, let's not bother asking why virtually every Aussie industry has now been outsourced, leading to imported everything which, when you consider the true cost to Australia, is not 'cheap'.

Rudd's playing the same script as Howard .. that of the Aussie Battler's Buddy. When in fact, he's working to exactly the same agenda as Howard, who in turn worked for the Usual Suspects.

What does the public know of the mismanagement of the Murray's waters, or of the 93% of the rice crop's destruction in the Riverina ? Rice used to be cheap as dirt. Noticed it climbing in price lately, along with forecasts of world famine ? What sort of government rips out 93% of a staple crop like rice, which can keep an army alive for cents ? So where do we get our rice from these days .. yes .. overseas. And if their rice crop 'fails' by strange coincidence a little further along the line -- what do we call that, 'coincidence'. Or engineered world-famine? Just as the farmers in the Riverina are calling the reason for the end to Australia's food bowl a 'man made drought'.

But people in the UK, most of them, know little of this. They're seduced by photos of dazzling blue waters and white sands and palm trees .. oh, and the glowing testimonials of those who 'made it in Oz'.

The water situation in South East Queensland is dire, more often than not. And it's been dire since they built Hinze Dam in a location which seemed extremely suspicious to those with their eye on the ball.

The populations in the handful of cities in Oz has continued to grow. But where's been the growth in infrastructure ? And why has much of the once-existing infrastructure been made redundant ? Sydney used to have several dams closer to the city than Warragamba. Why were they 'decommissioned' at the same time the population was encouraged to grow from one million to now, over four million ?

I suspect the Queensland government and media are suppressing a hell of a lot in the interests of Bligh and the next election. Will be interesting (catastropic for some, no doubt) to see what finally emerges when the elections are over.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 8:34 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by folic
For years, Melbourne was ranked 3rd most dangerous city in the world, according to the media -- or maybe it was 'the' most dangerous. You don't hear much about it now and those not living with the situation are largely unaware of the migrant-generated crime there, currently. I was shocked to learn in a forum the other day, the extent of violence connected with recently-arrived Africans and of the lenient (insanely lenient in the opinion of those discussing it) sentence imposed by a judge who apparently justified the lenience by claiming that as the offender had grown up in an extremely violent (murderous) environment overseas, he could not be expected to understand the lesser violence in Australia. So there's the 'one rule for some' situation out in the open.

The Aussie media is owned by the same people who control Aussie politicians (who own those politicians, basically). And Australia is said to have the most monopolistic media in the world (print, televised, etc). Even the supposedly 'independent' little local rags are actually owned by the same media 'barons' (world and opinion shapers). So, they pump out the trivia, the latest underwear fashion shows by Kylie and the love lives of sports stars .. lots of sport. News .. time it: seven to ten minutes on average, followed by sports, sports, sports 'news' and then the weather, all chock a block filled with commercials, followed by more 'current affairs' beat-ups to get the public's blood boiling about 'single mothers' or 'welfare cheats' .. and to take their minds off the shocking state of public transport, failure to create more dams and failure to haul in the robber-baron supermarket chains who're ripping off Aussie farmers. And gee, let's not bother asking why virtually every Aussie industry has now been outsourced, leading to imported everything which, when you consider the true cost to Australia, is not 'cheap'.

Rudd's playing the same script as Howard .. that of the Aussie Battler's Buddy. When in fact, he's working to exactly the same agenda as Howard, who in turn worked for the Usual Suspects.

What does the public know of the mismanagement of the Murray's waters, or of the 93% of the rice crop's destruction in the Riverina ? Rice used to be cheap as dirt. Noticed it climbing in price lately, along with forecasts of world famine ? What sort of government rips out 93% of a staple crop like rice, which can keep an army alive for cents ? So where do we get our rice from these days .. yes .. overseas. And if their rice crop 'fails' by strange coincidence a little further along the line -- what do we call that, 'coincidence'. Or engineered world-famine? Just as the farmers in the Riverina are calling the reason for the end to Australia's food bowl a 'man made drought'.

But people in the UK, most of them, know little of this. They're seduced by photos of dazzling blue waters and white sands and palm trees .. oh, and the glowing testimonials of those who 'made it in Oz'.

The water situation in South East Queensland is dire, more often than not. And it's been dire since they built Hinze Dam in a location which seemed extremely suspicious to those with their eye on the ball.

The populations in the handful of cities in Oz has continued to grow. But where's been the growth in infrastructure ? And why has much of the once-existing infrastructure been made redundant ? Sydney used to have several dams closer to the city than Warragamba. Why were they 'decommissioned' at the same time the population was encouraged to grow from one million to now, over four million ?

I suspect the Queensland government and media are suppressing a hell of a lot in the interests of Bligh and the next election. Will be interesting (catastropic for some, no doubt) to see what finally emerges when the elections are over.
That sounds about right for the news broadcasts here
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 9:19 pm
  #24  
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by cricket1
This might be an interesting exercise. What's your perception of Australia from where you are at the moment? What draws you to it? We can perhaps act as a mirror for you.
Originally Posted by Heljinder
Maybe have a look in your own backyard to see if you can make any changes in your day to day life first, before committing to moving abroad.

As Cricket says, "what draws you to Australia?". For me, it was being fed up with the rat race, wanting a different experience and a little bit of wanderlust thrown in for good measure. Well I got the different experience, but you can go on holiday to do that and it won't cost you a fortune, your job and the domestic disruption. As for my wanderlust, well that has been well and truly sated. Life is a lot less stressful here, but I could have changed that without crossing the globe.

I'm not back home yet, and I don't need to be to know that I regret moving in the first place - if that makes sense!

Had I been a 'ten pound pom' then I think returning to England after 12 months wouldn't have been an option. Most of them wouldn't have had the resources back then to just up and leave Aus if they didn't like it, and instead would have had to get on with forging a future here.

It's very different now, as there are many who come here, simply because they can. They can easily dip their toe in to test the water first, safe in the knowledge that it can be withdrawn if needed - which can be destructive in itself.

I think unless you're 100% committed to making Australia your home, and for the right reasons, then stay where you are.

Having said all this though, the "what if.........." which nags at the back of the mind, maybe to hard to ignore.

Good luck!
Both interesting replies, thanks.
I have thought about this long and hard.
When I first started researching the move (years ago) I had Aussie friends who spoke of how much better life was, how wages were better, quality of life was better and the weather was fabulous.
A few years on, I have done a lot of research and have a much more balanced view.
I know of people who have made the move and loved it, others who moved and hated it, plus quite a few in between who are ambivalent.
I know now that with the loss of equity in the house plus the exchxnge rate we would not have a lot of money. There would be no 4x2 in a great area for us. My husbands job doesn't transfer and so work for him could be a problem.
That leaves me with adventure and wanderlust
I have moved several times within the U.K searching for what I want but in the words of U2 I still haven't found what I'm looking for.
I'm very aware that I may never find it because I'm not completely sure what "it" is
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 9:41 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Kapri, I would think long and hard, especially in the current climate. My wife and I are very happy here and have "made it in Oz" as another poster put it. We love most things about the place and have not experienced very many, if any of the negatives mentioned by previous posters. The quality of life here is superb.
The thing is I loved the UK too. Much of our satisfaction about life here has been brought about by sea changes we made personally with the move and if we really applied ourselves we could well have achieved the same in the UK, minus the weather of course
The UK is a first rate country, stocked by first rate people, so try to look past the current negativity there, and reevaluate your lives and what you can do to improve it. By all means look at emigration further down the line, and as someone whose life has improved immeasurably since moving, I would recommend it - but it is not a cure all.
Try to see through the unbalanced posts too. people will knock both Aus and the UK, but the fact is that both offer amazing opportunities and a high standard of life. But.... Which is for you? The $ 64,000 question!
For us Aus has afforded me a career change that would have been unlikely to have occured in the UK. We love the climate and the people. There are many flaws but they are not flaws that are deal breakers for us.
Whatever you do, do not base your choices on the "Britain is awful" scenario. It simply is not true.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 9:42 pm
  #26  
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Like some of the others on here I married an Aussie so didn't exactly choose to come here, it just kind of happened that way, I don't dislike it or regret it but after 11 years very much looking forward to going back to the UK for all its faults it is still home and where 95% of my F&F live.

Liked your post folic....

Australians work the longest hours in the western world so I don't know where the basis for this "Quality of life" line that is endlessly and mindlessly parrotted by so many comes from. Unless quality of life is easured solely on square metrage of your house which is larger in Aus than the UK.

So OP if Australia is an itch that you just have to scratch then you will go ahead and do it, just remember wherever you go in the world you are still there, life goes on here very much like in the UK, people still have jobs and work 40+ hrs a week, drive a car, live in a house and pay bills.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 9:46 pm
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by islandergirl
Like some of the others on here I married an Aussie so didn't exactly choose to come here, it just kind of happened that way, I don't dislike it or regret it but after 11 years very much looking forward to going back to the UK for all its faults it is still home and where 95% of my F&F live.

Liked your post folic....

Australians work the longest hours in the western world so I don't know where the basis for this "Quality of life" line that is endlessly and mindlessly parrotted by so many comes from. Unless quality of life is easured solely on square metrage of your house which is larger in Aus than the UK.

So OP if Australia is an itch that you just have to scratch then you will go ahead and do it, just remember wherever you go in the world you are still there, life goes on here very much like in the UK, people still have jobs and work 40+ hrs a week, drive a car, live in a house and pay bills.
My quality of life has sky rocketed here, but I would have to post a long one to explain. Only part is due to Aus.
However.....

http://www.il-ireland.com/il/qofl2009/
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 10:05 pm
  #28  
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

I could argue a lot of the scoring on this eg USA getting 100% for Freedom category have the survey people never heard of the Patriot Act?

For me, I do the exact same job here in Aus as in the UK, in an office all day doing the same stuff, I suppose if I had been eg a marine biologist rather than accountant I might be going to work in shorts etc on a speedboat but really there is no big difference on a day to day basis.
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 10:11 pm
  #29  
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

Originally Posted by islandergirl
I could argue a lot of the scoring on this eg USA getting 100% for Freedom category have the survey people never heard of the Patriot Act?

For me, I do the exact same job here in Aus as in the UK, in an office all day doing the same stuff, I suppose if I had been eg a marine biologist rather than accountant I might be going to work in shorts etc on a speedboat but really there is no big difference on a day to day basis.
To be honest, these indices are all bollocks. If they weren't it would be easy

You have to be in the place and feel what living there actually is. It varies wildly on an individual basis tbh
Shouldn't really have posted it, I think they are...... silly?
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Old Mar 12th 2009, 10:22 pm
  #30  
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Default Re: Those who have returned ...do you regret having emigrated in the first place?

That's cool I always take these things with a hefty pinch of salt too, I put the up there with the quizzes in Cosmo about who your ideal celebrity hookup would be.

kporte we can agree that living in Aus is good and living in the UK is also good.

I have to point out to most people that moving to Aus once the novelty wears off is generally the same old grind as the UK - unless you go and work as a lifeguard, or at a winery or something radically different that can only be done in Aus.
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