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The recipe thread

The recipe thread

Old Jun 1st 2014, 11:11 pm
  #166  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Hi,

If you would like to try the summer version of the aubergine cream salad grill the aubergine until they are covered with a black ash crust. Clear the crust off and mash the aubergine with a blunt wooden knife or a larger knife. Mix the mash in a bowl, stirring continuously with sunflower oil, about 100ml-150ml, which has to be added slowly. Then add the grated onion, little ground black pepper, one small spoon of lemon juice or vinegar and a pinch of sugar, optionally.

It can be served on fresh crusty slices of bread with some fresh tomatoes. Very yummy summer dish! My Mum used to make it often when she used to take us kids to the outdoor swimming pools. She used to keep it into a plastic container in a cool box, and she only spread it on the crusty slices of bread when we were literally dying to eat something, anything , after starving ourselves to death by spending hours in the pools. This was in the 60s-70s...Felix Spa was Heaven on earth those days!

Enjoy!
LZ x
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Last edited by Lady Zelda; Jun 1st 2014 at 11:39 pm.
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Old Jun 3rd 2014, 10:20 pm
  #167  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Marrow in sour cream sauce ( Tokfozelek)

Ingredients:
1 larger marrow
1tsp of Vegeta or Delikat powder
2Tbsp of sunflower oil
1 onion
A small glass of water
1 small pack of fresh dill
1 heaped Tbsp flour
2-3 Tbsp of sour cream
1-2tsp white wine vinegar
1 tsp sugar
1/2 - 1 tsp paprika
A small glass of milk


Preparations:
Pare the marrow and remove seeds with a spoon if necessary ( if the marrow is young I do not remove the seeds) then cut it into long thin strips and finally cut the strips into small square cubes, the smaller the better.
Put the sunflower oil into a pan. Add the onions and cook until tender. Add the marrow and fry it together with the onions for another minute or so, add the water, the dill, the paprika, the Vegeta, cover it and cook until tender, about 10-12minutes. Add the vinegar and the sugar and mix it well.

Just before the marrow gets tender, mix in a separate glass bowl the flour, the sour cream and the milk and add it gently to the marrow sauce stirring it continuously. Turn the gas off while you are still stirring it, otherwise you may end up with a thicker consistency. If that happens you can add a little more milk or sour cream.

You can eat it at once with fresh bread rolls, or even cold in a hot summer day, or you can consume it with roast chicken or roast pork, or meat balls, or schnitzel, or fried sausages, or fried eggs or eggy bread you name it.

It is delicious and easy to make.
Bon appetite!

PS For a reacher flavour you can fry the onions in a bacon fat and let the angry Hungarian ancestors haunt you in your dream!


LZ x
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Last edited by Lady Zelda; Jun 3rd 2014 at 10:23 pm.
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Old Jun 9th 2014, 10:20 am
  #168  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Liking the look of the rice cake though guessing it has egg in it? If so, do you think it would set without it? Eldest son has numerous allergies, one being egg as such, he doesn't eat cake. I used to make him rice and chocolate balls, which he loved and thinking of making this along the lines of a bakewell tart - pastry then jam and filled with the rice pudding hmm
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Old Jun 9th 2014, 10:54 am
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Default Re: The recipe thread

There are plenty of eggless cake recipes:

Eggless-baking-recipes
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Old Jun 9th 2014, 11:21 am
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Cheers Fib but he has an aversion to anything that even resembles a sponge cake. When he was nearly three, he ate a blueberry muffin, was violently ill and ended up really ill so I can't blame him.
The only cakes he really eats are unbaked chocolate cheese cakes, he won't even try the egg less cookies I make. As the chocolate rice balls were such a hit with him, I'm hoping he'll like this as I feel he's missing out when the other two are having cake
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Old Jun 9th 2014, 12:50 pm
  #171  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Hi Rural

The rice cake needs 4-5 egg yolks and at the end needs the beaten egg whites to make it fluffier and softer when baked, but you can try it without it. Make a small portion of rice pudding, add a pinch of salt into the milk, the rice, little sugar, vanilla sugar, small vanilla pod and the zest of a medium lemon. Add a little butter to it when it is already cooked, so it does not get too dry when baked in the oven. Optionally you can add to it a small pack of baking powder to help it raise. If you cannot use the eggs, then perhaps you could add a few spoons of flour. 2 or 3sp, not a lot depending on how much pudding you are intending to make. The flour helps the cooked pudding to stick together better. You can add some pre- soaked sultanas to the pudding before you bake it, or you can add other dried fruits if he does not like sultanas.

Grease a smaller deeper baking tray or a few ramekins and coat it with either fine breadcrumbs or Hungarian polenta, then bake it at 180-200C until it gets nice and brown without being too burnt on the top.

Give it a go without the eggs. Your son may be loving it. My grandchildren like it very much, but they are not allergic to eggs, luckily. Mira, the girl, occasionally has eczema on her arms, but that is mainly due to certain chemicals which she gets in contact with. She cannot use soaps and other ordinary shower gels, except the medicated ones like Sanex, the dermo sensitive lactoserum, which I buy in England.

Well, this is it really. See how it goes. Have a nice weekend in this scorchy Hungarian weather...33C in the shade...we are in the garden splashing ourselves in the swimming pool. Hope you are enjoying the Bank Holiday with your kids, too, if you are back to Hungary.

Regards
LZ x
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 8:47 am
  #172  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

This is a good quick base sauce recipe if you have the ingredients:


I have made the madras many times and added my tweaks, its very good and a lot less hassle than making gallons of other base sauce recipes.
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:10 am
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Smile Re: The recipe thread

Originally Posted by richardmc View Post
This is a good quick base sauce recipe if you have the ingredients:

The Spicery - How to make a Curry Sauce - YouTube

I have made the madras many times and added my tweaks, its very good and a lot less hassle than making gallons of other base sauce recipes.
Looks delishous. I have to admit I cheat
I use curry powder, paste ect and then tweak lol
But it still taste yummy.
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:12 am
  #174  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Apologies about the large UT screen I thought it would just show the link.

Last edited by BEVS; Jun 17th 2014 at 10:43 am. Reason: It will be the tech blips
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:14 am
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Default Re: The recipe thread

I recently made a trip to Dubai and came back with lots of curry powders and spices. I am a big fan or tumeric. Do Hungarians use tumeric in any of their dishes? I gave some to a Hungarian friend to use in her rice and she is now a convert.
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:23 am
  #176  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

I think they must Pol as it's readily available in the supermarkets - I know because the children often bought it by mistake, they thought it was ginger.
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:29 am
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Originally Posted by Rural Hungary View Post
I think they must Pol as it's readily available in the supermarkets - I know because the children often bought it by mistake, they thought it was ginger.
Yes, I just wonder what dish. I am off now to devour the curry we made yesterday :-)
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:34 am
  #178  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

I've found a few soups but none look really authentic. With it being so widely available, there must be a typical use for - somebody will know I'm sure. Enjoy your curry I need to go help Nic pack for her arctic adventure
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:45 am
  #179  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Not really Polgardi.

Not many Hungarians know what turmeric is, and even if some know it, they only use it for colouring rice or other food.

Hungarians, just like the English, eat very traditional food. The difference is that the Huns use more local herbs and spices, whilst the English dishes were greatly influenced by the medieval invaders, Vikings, Normans, French and later if was affected by the Indian cuisine, which brought back the curry and another spicy sauces and condiments.

For centuries the English aristocracy ate only French food as a source of distinction from the peasants, as a fact. Throughout the two world wars England gained a reputation for poor cooking and became a gastronomic joke worldwide.

Today the national dish is the Tikka Masala and the British are very proud with their obsession with curries and the spicy sauces. These are all an intrinsic part of the Beitish cuisine, and we all love it.

Richard loved the video, but after watching it once, I can no longer open it. It comes out on my Ipad as a white blank picture. If we get access to the PM again, could you please resend it to me there.

Thanks in advance.

LZ x
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Old Jun 17th 2014, 10:50 am
  #180  
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Default Re: The recipe thread

Originally Posted by Lady Zelda View Post
Not really Polgardi.

Not many Hungarians know what turmeric is, and even if some know it, they only use it for colouring rice or other food.

Hungarians, just like the English, eat very traditional food. The difference is that the Huns use more local herbs and spices, whilst the English dishes were greatly influenced by the medieval invaders, Vikings, Normans, French and later if was affected by the Indian cuisine, which brought back the curry and another spicy sauces and condiments.

For centuries the English aristocracy ate only French food as a source of distinction from the peasants, as a fact. Throughout the two world wars England gained a reputation for poor cooking and became a gastronomic joke worldwide.

Today the national dish is the Tikka Masala and the British are very proud with their obsession with curries and the spicy sauces. These are all an intrinsic part of the Beitish cuisine, and we all love it.

Richard loved the video, but after watching it once, I can no longer open it. It comes out on my Ipad as a white blank picture. If we get access to the PM again, could you please resend it to me there.

Thanks in advance.

LZ x
If you go into YouTube and search "The Spicery" it should show the videos he has made, cheers
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