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UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Old Apr 8th 2013, 6:44 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Zen10 View Post
They are all of roughly the same political persuasion, so it makes very little difference who you vote for from a political perspective. As a poster says, Rudd was removed from power because he tried to increase taxation on the rich, which is worrying from the perspective of participatory democracy, even if you happen to disagree with him.

We are compelled to vote in Australia, or at least to attend a polling booth. Considering they are all so similar in political views it makes little difference who one votes for. Both parties have encouraged the wealth gap between rich and poor to grow, both parties have allowed top-level taxation to fall massively over the last few generations. They differ in the same way British or American parties differ, and that is solely on issues of social progressivism. In this way, they are able to fool the people that there is a choice, and a debate in parliament, when there is none at all for the fundamental monetary issues.
I go along with most of this. It seems to be that in Aus and the UK there has simply been a move to somewhere near the centre and it started a fair while back, in the UK at any rate. I only say that with caution as the Labor party in Australia is still so union-driven.

I see parties as just submitting tenders to get elected.
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Old Apr 8th 2013, 8:06 am
  #62  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by quoll View Post
He's nowhere near an ignoramus and is the best hope Australia has of getting out of the mire that Labor has got it into. He's a nice bloke as well, I hope he romps it in at the polls.
I'm not sure what mire you're talking about. GDP is still growing at over 3%, the deficit is on its way down and government spending is near historical lows. It's nothing like the grim situation that the UK is in.
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Old Apr 8th 2013, 8:27 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by quoll View Post
He's nowhere near an ignoramus and is the best hope Australia has of getting out of the mire that Labor has got it into. He's a nice bloke as well, I hope he romps it in at the polls.
I agree. He won't do any worse that the idiots we have running the economy now and might do a whole lot better. He wouldn't be my first choice but I'm voting for him anyway.

We have friends whose daughter is a cop. On one of his recent visits, she and a load of other cops went for a run with him one morning. She says he was really nice, had a laugh and didn't talk about politics. She also said he is f**king fit and outran a lot of the cops.
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Old Apr 8th 2013, 11:31 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Budawang View Post
I'm not sure what mire you're talking about. GDP is still growing at over 3%, the deficit is on its way down and government spending is near historical lows. It's nothing like the grim situation that the UK is in.
We are indeed living in the lucky country
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Old Apr 9th 2013, 8:55 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Neither country will automatically give your kids a better future, none of us know what the future holds. Youth unemployment in both countries is roughly the same so there is nothing to suggest one or the other has an advantage. Obviously some will just say Australia especially on here as this is a migrant forum so they want to believe their chosen country is 'better'. Both are goid countries to live in and both will give your kids the possibility of a great future. In the end it just comes down to which country you prefer to be in.
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Old Apr 9th 2013, 10:50 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by chris955 View Post
Neither country will automatically give your kids a better future, none of us know what the future holds. Youth unemployment in both countries is roughly the same so there is nothing to suggest one or the other has an advantage. Obviously some will just say Australia especially on here as this is a migrant forum so they want to believe their chosen country is 'better'. Both are goid countries to live in and both will give your kids the possibility of a great future. In the end it just comes down to which country you prefer to be in.
When one considers there are around 200 countries in the world, and that frankly speaking one would really only want to live in around 20 of them, or 10%, those with access to Britain and Australia should consider themselves extraordinarily lucky. Both countries offer a very high standard of living compared with the majority of those 200 countries.
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Old Apr 10th 2013, 1:19 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Zen10 View Post
When one considers there are around 200 countries in the world, and that frankly speaking one would really only want to live in around 20 of them, or 10%, those with access to Britain and Australia should consider themselves extraordinarily lucky. Both countries offer a very high standard of living compared with the majority of those 200 countries.
Fully agree!!
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 6:32 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Zen10 View Post
When one considers there are around 200 countries in the world, and that frankly speaking one would really only want to live in around 20 of them, or 10%, those with access to Britain and Australia should consider themselves extraordinarily lucky. Both countries offer a very high standard of living compared with the majority of those 200 countries.
I am going to disagree. My wife is the result of a English father and Peruvian mother. He moved to Peru on a whim as a newly qualified accountant. The quality if life they had was incredible. Think 8 bedroom house, maids, one of the best schools in the world and so on. There are lots of other countries that do this. Also, the experience a child and family go through can be incredibly positive in some of the poorer countries for a range of reasons.

In fact, as someone that moved here without children, looking at the stats, I wonder why anyone would. Higher youth unemployment than the UK in the middle of a recession, almost half leaving education with no qualifications and a undergrad uni sector that this dire.
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 6:39 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by verystormy View Post
I am going to disagree. My wife is the result of a English father and Peruvian mother. He moved to Peru on a whim as a newly qualified accountant. The quality if life they had was incredible. Think 8 bedroom house, maids, one of the best schools in the world and so on. There are lots of other countries that do this. Also, the experience a child and family go through can be incredibly positive in some of the poorer countries for a range of reasons.

In fact, as someone that moved here without children, looking at the stats, I wonder why anyone would. Higher youth unemployment than the UK in the middle of a recession, almost half leaving education with no qualifications and a undergrad uni sector that this dire.

Interesting. My FiL lives in Malaysia, and they have a fantastic quality of living there - as you say, maids, drivers, huge residences, eat out at classy restaurants every evening.

Whereas here I have $42 Fish & Chips...


S
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 6:53 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by verystormy View Post
He moved to Peru on a whim as a newly qualified accountant. The quality if life they had was incredible. Think 8 bedroom house, maids, one of the best schools in the world and so on.
Probably the same school I went to! We had 2 maids too and a holiday home on the coast. My mum was gutted when we had to move to the UK. In fact, we all were.
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 7:04 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by verystormy View Post
I am going to disagree. My wife is the result of a English father and Peruvian mother. He moved to Peru on a whim as a newly qualified accountant. The quality if life they had was incredible. Think 8 bedroom house, maids, one of the best schools in the world and so on. There are lots of other countries that do this. Also, the experience a child and family go through can be incredibly positive in some of the poorer countries for a range of reasons.
Do you think he would have had the same quality of life if he was born, raised and educated in Peru?
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 7:11 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by verystormy View Post
I am going to disagree. My wife is the result of a English father and Peruvian mother. He moved to Peru on a whim as a newly qualified accountant. The quality if life they had was incredible. Think 8 bedroom house, maids, one of the best schools in the world and so on. There are lots of other countries that do this. Also, the experience a child and family go through can be incredibly positive in some of the poorer countries for a range of reasons.

In fact, as someone that moved here without children, looking at the stats, I wonder why anyone would. Higher youth unemployment than the UK in the middle of a recession, almost half leaving education with no qualifications and a undergrad uni sector that this dire.
Originally Posted by JoeBloggs80 View Post
Do you think he would have had the same quality of life if he was born, raised and educated in Peru?
I don't think Zen was knocking Latin America - he spuriously selected 10pc and mentioned 2 Anglo countries we all focus on.

Don't knock 3rd world /Latin American countries (to noone in particular).
Education is often fantastic in the private schools, and the privileged in those countries know how to live...!
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 7:23 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by BadgeIsBack View Post
I don't think Zen was knocking Latin America - he spuriously selected 10pc and mentioned 2 Anglo countries we all focus on.

Don't knock 3rd world /Latin American countries (to noone in particular).
Education is often fantastic in the private schools, and the privileged in those countries know how to live...!
I certainly wasn't knocking any region. I'm saying that for English speakers used to western liberal democracy and our rather lax social customs, there are only a certain number of countries we could easily move to and fit in. You might have family in somewhere like Peru or Angola or Philippines and then you're going to be just fine there.

But it is important to note that overall living standards in many countries are far below those of UK/Aus, etc., with a lot of poverty. I saw a report on Sierra Leone the other day on France24 and it was just unbelievable.
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 7:34 am
  #74  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Countries that have a small, wealthy elite and a massive impoverished population are always going to be challenging places to live. Look at South Africa. Many people lead luxurious, priviledged lives with amazing homes, cars, maids, top schools etc. But they do so at huge personal cost - the constant threat of violent crime, the need for drastic security, discrimination etc.

Parts of South America have narco-terrorists, Shining Path, violence, kidnapping, lack of freedom of speech and so on. Asia does seem to fare better though.

UK and Australia, as true western democracies are better places to raise children, with Australia the pick of the 2.
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Old Apr 11th 2013, 7:39 am
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Amazulu View Post
He's a socialist twat
Thank f**k he's gone

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