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UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Old Apr 4th 2013, 9:38 pm
  #31  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by RedDragon2008 View Post
Another point that may be worth mentioning is nothing has to be permanent.

What is wrong with a 5 or 10 year stint and then a return to Europe?

We live in a very mobile world. Its just as easy to move from country to country as it is from county to county. (Ignoring visa complications).
Nice dea as long as you don't have kids in HS - moving them here and there and back again can be very disadvantaging unfortunately. If you are single or married with no kids then I'm all in favour of moving where the best opportunities are - even with PS aged kids you have some flexibility but after the first year or two of HS it's a whole different ball game.
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 2:47 am
  #32  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

A few points.

Unemployment in young people is actually higher in Oz - 24% in Oz and rising against 21% in the UK and falling

It is of concern that you couldn't get a job in logistics / freight in WA given it is a major freight centre.

The Oz economy is starting to stutter as mining undergoes significant slow down. There have been a lot of redundancies in the mining industry recently and there are going to be more. While it initially affects WA and QLD more, it will quickly affect the other states as well.

Being an employer of a number of Oz graduates I am pretty shocked at the quality of teaching they have received. They are a year or two below Europen grads. I know where I would want my children to go to uni.
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 4:11 am
  #33  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by verystormy View Post
A few points.

Unemployment in young people is actually higher in Oz - 24% in Oz and rising against 21% in the UK and falling

It is of concern that you couldn't get a job in logistics / freight in WA given it is a major freight centre.

The Oz economy is starting to stutter as mining undergoes significant slow down. There have been a lot of redundancies in the mining industry recently and there are going to be more. While it initially affects WA and QLD more, it will quickly affect the other states as well.

Being an employer of a number of Oz graduates I am pretty shocked at the quality of teaching they have received. They are a year or two below Europen grads. I know where I would want my children to go to uni.
That'll begin to change as soon as the current bunch of clowns get booted out
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 4:19 am
  #34  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by paulry View Post
That'll begin to change as soon as the current bunch of clowns get booted out

You think that mining will pick up again under Abbot?


S
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 5:16 am
  #35  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by paulry View Post
That'll begin to change as soon as the current bunch of clowns get booted out
I would like to think so, but I just can't see it. It's not just about the carbon and mining tax any more, but the cost of operating. Look at the most recent major layoffs:
Newcrest - gold so no mining tax, but have been hit by carbon tax
Newmont - gold and not affected by either
Bronze Wing - gold and not affected by either.

A number of the nickel mines are struggling / have made redundancies.

One of the major exploration drill companies went into administration this week.

Lead / zinc exploration is non existent.
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 5:28 am
  #36  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by verystormy View Post
I would like to think so, but I just can't see it. It's not just about the carbon and mining tax any more, but the cost of operating. Look at the most recent major layoffs:
Newcrest - gold so no mining tax, but have been hit by carbon tax
Newmont - gold and not affected by either
Bronze Wing - gold and not affected by either.

A number of the nickel mines are struggling / have made redundancies.

One of the major exploration drill companies went into administration this week.

Lead / zinc exploration is non existent.
My understanding is that the cost of mining the materials is going up fast (fuel, wages etc...) and the yields/prices are going down.
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 5:43 am
  #37  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

I reckon that the gov't should have run the mining industry differently, not allowing mining companies to pillage the continent on their own but simply sun-contracting external companies to extract minerals/resources FOR the gov't. All resources would be owned and subsequently sold by a gov't-owned entity.
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 5:51 am
  #38  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by renth View Post
My understanding is that the cost of mining the materials is going up fast (fuel, wages etc...) and the yields/prices are going down.
Wages are stable, or falling

High AUD is hurting (although helping when importing gear)
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 6:13 am
  #39  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

[
Originally Posted by Swerv-o View Post
You think that mining will pick up again under Abbot?

S
I'd say it's more likely to improve under Abbot than get worse. But some good points raised by VeryStormy.
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Old Apr 5th 2013, 9:49 am
  #40  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

If I were you I would stay as
- you have a job which covers all the costs & you love
- no mortgage
BUT, you have a stay at home husband

Things aren't cheap here even though the A$ is high. It's an expensive move and the exchange rate is definitely not in yr favour. You will both need to work in Australia and have a mortgage. Aussie employers aren't great with flexible working hrs unless you worked with them prior to children & there's no guarentee you'll get a job either.

You've answered yr own question I think and it doesn't matter what the rest of us say. Good luck!
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Old Apr 6th 2013, 12:07 am
  #41  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by astera View Post
I reckon that the gov't should have run the mining industry differently, not allowing mining companies to pillage the continent on their own but simply sun-contracting external companies to extract minerals/resources FOR the gov't. All resources would be owned and subsequently sold by a gov't-owned entity.
Who is going to find the deposits? Exploration is a VERY risky business - has a failure rate of 99%. Then mining itself is high risk. You decide to build a mine that may take several years but you don't know if the metal price is still going to make it worthwhile. So, you commit maybe a couple of billion dollars and it then fails because either the metal price has fallen, or a host of other reasons such as geotechnical, metallurgy or others. Who is going to pick up the bill?

Is the tax payer happy to be funding mines that are loss making - there are a number in Oz at the moment which are kept alive in the hope in the long term the metal price will pick up.
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Old Apr 6th 2013, 12:11 am
  #42  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Gill73 View Post
I know this is a big open question, but do you think that Australia offers our children a better future - ie in terms of employment and following the career path of their choice - in comparison to the UK?

My current opinion, based on the difficulties that I see my friends having with their 18-20 year old children, is that there are limited opportunities in UK and getting a start via a job or apprenticeship in their chosen field is impossible right now, which leaves them feeling dissapointed and demotivated. A friend who lives in the North East of UK has a daughter who is a qualified teacher. Her daughter has had to move to the outskirts of London to get a job and it's only a years temporary contract.

Does the future look brighter in Australia - particularly Melbourne where we hope to be heading?
The answer is that both countries are the best for your children's futures. If your children have British and Australian citizenship they have more opportunities than both British and Australian citizens. Therefore the best course of action is to secure their Australian citizenship. Then they have both.
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Old Apr 6th 2013, 2:26 am
  #43  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by DBinLondon View Post

However, a more fundamental issue I think is being ignored is because things are doing OK, and have been for almost 20 years, I think there is a real sense of complacency in Australia, which reinforces the 'Oz is the greatest country in the world and nothing overseas could be better (particularly any comparison to the UK!). Despite the hardships that the UK is enduring, some of the changes that have been and are going to be made, should make the UK a better place in the future.

Many Brits are inadvertantly branded as being 'Whingeing Poms' by some Aussies here, but expats are really are pointing out things that can be done better here. You could talk for hours comparing public transport infrastructure, politics, grocery shopping, mobile phone contracts...the list is a long one.
This is exactly that I have noticed as well. It feels like Aus is stuck in a stasis bubble, things are very very slow to change if ever. I often find myself shaking my head at things that could be improved and in the UK would be, but its like people are in a collective daydream with their heads filled with cotton wool. Like the heat has fried some circuits in their brains, and no amount of logic and reason can open their eyes.

At work its frustrating trying to get things done, there is an undercurrent of disorganisation, laziness and dont give a crap attitude that makes things an uphill struggle. But outside of work its the complete opposite, in social time they suddenly wake up and try to cram events into every hour of the day and I want to just say, calm the f*** down and enjoy your time off
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Old Apr 6th 2013, 5:43 am
  #44  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by dave99 View Post
This is exactly that I have noticed as well. It feels like Aus is stuck in a stasis bubble, things are very very slow to change if ever. I often find myself shaking my head at things that could be improved and in the UK would be, but its like people are in a collective daydream with their heads filled with cotton wool. Like the heat has fried some circuits in their brains, and no amount of logic and reason can open their eyes.

At work its frustrating trying to get things done, there is an undercurrent of disorganisation, laziness and dont give a crap attitude that makes things an uphill struggle. But outside of work its the complete opposite, in social time they suddenly wake up and try to cram events into every hour of the day and I want to just say, calm the f*** down and enjoy your time off
Every country does some things well, other things badly

Plenty of things in the UK are backward, lazy, disorganised, f**ked up, 3rd world even. Others things are done well

Same in Australia, as in every other country
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Old Apr 6th 2013, 6:20 am
  #45  
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Default Re: UK vs Australia for childrens' futures

Originally Posted by Zen10 View Post
The answer is that both countries are the best for your children's futures. If your children have British and Australian citizenship they have more opportunities than both British and Australian citizens. Therefore the best course of action is to secure their Australian citizenship. Then they have both.
Yup! And not forgetting they can pass it on to their children too. This century is sure to be full of tough challenges so the more citizenships we can load up our kids and their kids with the better.
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