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Moving with Children

Moving with Children

Old Apr 28th 2022, 1:19 pm
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Default Moving with Children

Hi Everyone,

I've been offered a role in Orlando with my company, they are just about to file my L1 paperwork. We'll be moving over with two kids (aged 8 and nearly 11) and I wanted to know if people had moved with kids of a similar age, and how you found the transition to schooling? Are they young enough where they'll be able to adapt easily (I know that's subjective) to the curriculum, or are there schools available that teach the UK curriculum? We've been looking in to areas that have highly rated schools, so I'm hoping the level of teaching etc. is pretty much where they need to be at.

Appreciate any advice or similar experience stories!
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 2:26 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

I will not project my own opinion as 'you must do this', in an effort to be more diplomatic. If it was me, have them stay with family and finish school in the UK, even through Uni, then after that, they can decide to move to be with you with an appropriate visa (another conversation). If they do come with you now, since you are moving to FL, plan to have them attend an elite private school to ensure they have a good level of education. Others may disagree, however, this is how I would approach it.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 3:57 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by PetrifiedExPat View Post
I will not project my own opinion as 'you must do this', in an effort to be more diplomatic. If it was me, have them stay with family and finish school in the UK, even through Uni, then after that, they can decide to move to be with you with an appropriate visa (another conversation). If they do come with you now, since you are moving to FL, plan to have them attend an elite private school to ensure they have a good level of education. Others may disagree, however, this is how I would approach it.
With the superiority of UK education they should be the world leaders in all areas of science and technology and clearly they are not. Even the lowly US compares favorably with UK technical achievements. The body of knowledge for K thru 12 is nothing and if a kid can exit with good reading and math skills they will fare well in college. Educated parents with a interest in their child’s education can supplement any perceived deficiency in their schools. Would children of the age mentioned be happy being separated from their parents for most of their childhood?
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 4:46 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

I moved around the world when I was at those ages attending a different school in a different country every couple of years. If anything, I think it was a huge advantage for me in later life because I gained a broader education, improved social skills (from learning how to adapt and fit in) and increased confidence. I moved back to the UK when I was about 15 and had no issues with getting the qualifications required for University entrance. So, I say bring your kids over and enjoy life as a family. The good schools here are very good, find a good school district and your kids should be fine.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 4:53 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Moved with a, then 7 year old, and they slotted in really quickly and have flourished since. They had been struggling in the UK system, which is a different learning style from the evidence I have seen (Georgia here).

11 year old will move In Middle School, which I don't think is as huge a jump as Junior to Secondary can be in the UK. While they will change the way they are taught, you only have 3 age groups mixed into the school, not 5+. think that has made it a bit less overwhelming for our son vs. what I experienced years ago on making that jump.

Does the USA system seem a bit behind? probably. Can a good student still flourish and excel, yes.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 4:56 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Thanks for taking the time to respond those that have. Sounds like they should be just fine, after a period of adjustment.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 5:33 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by robtuck View Post
Moved with a, then 7 year old, and they slotted in really quickly and have flourished since. They had been struggling in the UK system, which is a different learning style from the evidence I have seen (Georgia here).

11 year old will move In Middle School, which I don't think is as huge a jump as Junior to Secondary can be in the UK. While they will change the way they are taught, you only have 3 age groups mixed into the school, not 5+. think that has made it a bit less overwhelming for our son vs. what I experienced years ago on making that jump.

Does the USA system seem a bit behind? probably. Can a good student still flourish and excel, yes.
i totally agree. In my experience of 21 years of formal education 12 secondary and 9 college, schools and teachers are seldom the limiting factor of academic success.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 5:36 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by ddsrph View Post
With the superiority of UK education they should be the world leaders in all areas of science and technology and clearly they are not. Even the lowly US compares favorably with UK technical achievements. The body of knowledge for K thru 12 is nothing and if a kid can exit with good reading and math skills they will fare well in college. Educated parents with a interest in their child’s education can supplement any perceived deficiency in their schools. Would children of the age mentioned be happy being separated from their parents for most of their childhood?
Like I said, all free to disagree. At the top end we spend significant time getting US grads up to speed, regardless of institution. But I work at the elite end.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 8:28 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by PetrifiedExPat View Post
Like I said, all free to disagree. At the top end we spend significant time getting US grads up to speed, regardless of institution. But I work at the elite end.
I agree we could do a much better job in our K-12 schools. We lag far behind many countries. In our recent past a kid could goof off thru school and have a decent living without going to college. With poorly motivated students how much could schools push them to do? In many countries education is deemed much more important for success in life. The interest in their kids education of most people on this site is probably as important as what US school they end up in. Too many American parents pay too little attention to their kids education. The same schools that turn out those you have to bring up to speed for college most likely turn out others ready to excel.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 8:49 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by DannyW View Post
Hi Everyone,

I've been offered a role in Orlando with my company, they are just about to file my L1 paperwork. We'll be moving over with two kids (aged 8 and nearly 11) and I wanted to know if people had moved with kids of a similar age, and how you found the transition to schooling? Are they young enough where they'll be able to adapt easily (I know that's subjective) to the curriculum, or are there schools available that teach the UK curriculum? We've been looking in to areas that have highly rated schools, so I'm hoping the level of teaching etc. is pretty much where they need to be at.

Appreciate any advice or similar experience stories!
We moved to Alabama in 2003 when our daughter was 11. As mentioned above, she was set to move to secondary school in the UK so would be changing schools anyway.

A lot will depend on your kids' personality as to how they integrate. Our daughter was (is) very introverted and made a conscious effort to lose her accent as she didn't like the attention it gained. I think 11 (or younger) is the ideal age.

In a middle-of-the-road public** school she excelled. Always at or near the top of the class. She later went to college on a full scholarship and emerged 4 years later with a bachelor's degree and ZERO debt.

If you're thinking that this may be temporary for just a few years, think long and hard. It will be much more difficult moving back with kids in their teen years.

Note: a "public" school is a state school. Not private.
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Old Apr 28th 2022, 9:10 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by ddsrph View Post
I agree we could do a much better job in our K-12 schools. We lag far behind many countries. In our recent past a kid could goof off thru school and have a decent living without going to college. With poorly motivated students how much could schools push them to do? In many countries education is deemed much more important for success in life. The interest in their kids education of most people on this site is probably as important as what US school they end up in. Too many American parents pay too little attention to their kids education. The same schools that turn out those you have to bring up to speed for college most likely turn out others ready to excel.
Part of the issue is the lack of examinations to determine graduation from high school- thus a certain percentage of students who apply- and accepted to state universities- but have to take remedial English or Math classes-so I wonder why the students were allowed a High School diploma in the first place. A few years ago one state university system was reported to have ten percent of incoming students requiring remedial classes.

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Old Apr 29th 2022, 1:18 am
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Part of the problem is graduation requirements. You can graduate with little in the way of math and science classes. Later when they decide to go to college the student is very deficient in math and science thru no fault of their school or teachers. Unless things have changed one course in basic math, which is just a recap of junior high math, is all that’s required to graduate high school.
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Old Apr 29th 2022, 3:02 am
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Originally Posted by ddsrph View Post
Part of the problem is graduation requirements. You can graduate with little in the way of math and science classes. Later when they decide to go to college the student is very deficient in math and science thru no fault of their school or teachers. Unless things have changed one course in basic math, which is just a recap of junior high math, is all that’s required to graduate high school.
Another issue is how math is taught, and level of expectations- and lack of accountability of the schools.

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Old Apr 29th 2022, 2:27 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Hello and welcome.

We have a wiki on the educational system and enrolling in US schools. It might answer some of your questions. https://britishexpats.com/wiki/Educa...s_in_school%3F

As for general education issues, it's just too hard to say. Absent private schooling, you are in a situation where which side of the street you live on in what town determines a great deal about your kid's schooling options and quality. Literally--which side of the street can make a difference.

I think some of the things you need to focus on, after the academics, would be:

a) long term plans--staying in the USA / returning to the UK
b) University plans for the kids -- staying in the USA / returning to the UK.
c) social / emotional adjustment -- making new friends, losing old ones, 'fitting in' in a new culture.
d) extracurricular options -- is your kid a good cricket player, or do they want to do Scouting.

You may find answering these questions will help guide your decisions not only on which school to select but also whether or not to even move over.

FWIW I moved from Hong Kong to the USA with a 10 and 12 year old. Academically they were fine (we generally had an American curriculum overseas though taught by UK/Aussie/Canadian teachers). Socially it was a bit tougher. They didn't fit in at first, and some of their interests (Football, Match of the Day, Anime) didn't really quickly translate with their peers who watched the NFL, baseball and MTV. Eventually they found their tribe and made good friends, but it took a bit longer than I thought it would.
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Old Apr 29th 2022, 9:33 pm
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Default Re: Moving with Children

Make sure you are extremely involved in your child's education. It is very easy for kids to fall through the cracks. Preferential time, money and prestige is given to sport, the gifted and those that shout the loudest and know the system. One of my daughters moved back to England aged 20 having moved here when 9 and she is horrified at her lack of general knowledge.
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