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Anybody know?

Anybody know?

Old Aug 23rd 2009, 4:38 pm
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Default Anybody know?

Hi.

Please don't slaughter me.

I'm 18 years old and want to move to the USA(yes, I know you have heard it all before) I just require a helping hand.

I'm going back to college in September to study for a Btec National Diploma in Forensic Science and then onto a degree in Forensics+Psychology. I wanted to know if this qualification would help in any way in obtaining a Visa.

I have followed the 'Work in the US' wiki but am none the wiser. If anybody could help I'll be grateful.

If you guys completely rule that out I will have to start my 10 year plus wait on my sister's back.

Thanks.
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 4:52 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by FortyTwo25 View Post
Hi.

Please don't slaughter me.

I'm 18 years old and want to move to the USA(yes, I know you have heard it all before) I just require a helping hand.

I'm going back to college in September to study for a Btec National Diploma in Forensic Science and then onto a degree in Forensics+Psychology. I wanted to know if this qualification would help in any way in obtaining a Visa.

I have followed the 'Work in the US' wiki but am none the wiser. If anybody could help I'll be grateful.

If you guys completely rule that out I will have to start my 10 year plus wait on my sister's back.

Thanks.
Do well in your UK undergraduate education, get a good job in the UK that will allow you to save money and good experience/references, then apply to a US university for a masters, then potentially a PhD. This opens up possibilities for internships (work placement), scholarships/assistantships (studentships), optional practical training (a year following your degree with permission to work in related employment in the US).

At the end of all this, you will hopefully have impressed the right people, will get an H-visa, then work-related GC. Or you might meet a gorgeous American woman and get married (the easier way to your GC).

This is just one potential path, but one that is often not suggested on here (i.e., getting to the States via education).
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 5:01 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

If you do your degree at a top level university it might open some options.

During your time as a student there are numerous ways to get out to the US on short term exchange programs, either for study or for work during the summer.

You could study the whole lot in the US, although this will cost you a lot of money.

There is a well-worn path for academics and researchers to get into the US on a long-term basis. After marriage I would say this is the second easiest and quickest way to do it. The good thing for you is you are young so you still have time to plan your strategy.

I think I have a good understanding of how young students and researchers can get to the US effectively. My own university-based route has proved to be quite successful, but there were lessons learned along the way. I'm thinking of writing an article on it to save me typing it out each time. Would that be a good idea?
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 5:15 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by dunroving View Post
Or you might meet a gorgeous American woman and get married (the easier way to your GC).
Since it appears from the icon that FortyTwo25 is female this might not be such a great idea from the immigration perspective.

While I certainly hope that the federal government will eventually recognize same sex marriage and extend the same immigration benefits to them as they do to opposite sex couples this is not currently in and of itself a viable path to immigration
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 5:25 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Note that your field of study may limit the type of employers who would be willing to sponsor you.

For example, should you choose to be a police officer or something like that, the primary employer for those jobs are local governments who are not, financially or politically, about to give a job to a 'foreigner' rather than a US citizen.

As you plan your course of studies, you should consider those careers that are in greater need in the US (engineers, medicine, etc).

Now, as for the specifics of your case, my advice would be to take a year or two in Uni and then try for a 'transfer year' at an American university. Spend a year in the US "living" not just "visiting" to get a good taste of what things are like (it's not all a bed of roses). If you are still interested in moving after that year, consider graduate programs over here to give you more time in country and develop the necessary network of friends and contacts that will help you secure full time employment & sponsorship. Or find a spouse. You never know.
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 6:11 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by caleyjag View Post
If you do your degree at a top level university it might open some options.

During your time as a student there are numerous ways to get out to the US on short term exchange programs, either for study or for work during the summer.

You could study the whole lot in the US, although this will cost you a lot of money.

There is a well-worn path for academics and researchers to get into the US on a long-term basis. After marriage I would say this is the second easiest and quickest way to do it. The good thing for you is you are young so you still have time to plan your strategy.

I think I have a good understanding of how young students and researchers can get to the US effectively. My own university-based route has proved to be quite successful, but there were lessons learned along the way. I'm thinking of writing an article on it to save me typing it out each time. Would that be a good idea?
That would be an excellent idea.
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 6:24 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by caleyjag View Post
If you do your degree at a top level university it might open some options.

I'm thinking of writing an article on it to save me typing it out each time. Would that be a good idea?
I honestly don't see myself getting into that type of university. Yes it would be.

Originally Posted by penguinsix View Post
Note that your field of study may limit the type of employers who would be willing to sponsor you.

For example, should you choose to be a police officer or something like that, the primary employer for those jobs are local governments who are not, financially or politically, about to give a job to a 'foreigner' rather than a US citizen.

As you plan your course of studies, you should consider those careers that are in greater need in the US (engineers, medicine, etc).
Well that isn't great as I haven't had a mind for anything else, this is what I want to do. 'Engineers, medicine, etc' I'm not book smart for that stuff.


EDIT: Would any of these make a difference....Applied Criminology BA Honours, Applied Criminology with Forensic Science BA Honours, Psychology and Forensic Science BSc Honours, Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Science BSc Honours, Psychology BSc Honours. yes I know I'm pulling at straws.

Last edited by FortyTwo25; Aug 23rd 2009 at 6:57 pm.
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 9:49 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Sadly probably none of those will be of much help.

You mentioned the possibility of getting an immigrant visa through your sister - is she a US citizen or a US permanent resident? As you are obviously aware this would take a very long time, but if you are eligible for that path then you are at least one small step ahead of most people who want to live in the US. Since it does take such a long time I would seriously suggest that you get that process started while you continue to look at other options.

If you are really serious about getting to the US then getting there by the time you are 30 is still a lot better than never getting there.
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 11:02 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by md95065 View Post
Sadly probably none of those will be of much help.

You mentioned the possibility of getting an immigrant visa through your sister - is she a US citizen or a US permanent resident? As you are obviously aware this would take a very long time, but if you are eligible for that path then you are at least one small step ahead of most people who want to live in the US. Since it does take such a long time I would seriously suggest that you get that process started while you continue to look at other options.

If you are really serious about getting to the US then getting there by the time you are 30 is still a lot better than never getting there.
She was naturalised last year. I only just met her(long story) so she may think *if I ask* that's the only reason why I'm getting to know her. I have asked her once not very directly but I asked.

That's right and I'm very serious about it
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 11:35 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Get your sister to get a petition in for you, it'll take years and you've nothing to lose.

Forensics, well work wise it probably won't get you a job over here, government jobs usually require citizenship which would probably be the biggest employer I'd guess.

Worth doing a masters in the US, that'll get you here and perhaps snag someone to get married
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Old Aug 23rd 2009, 11:37 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by caleyjag View Post
... I'm thinking of writing an article on it to save me typing it out each time. Would that be a good idea?
yes a article would be good, and also a wiki entry would be good
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Old Aug 24th 2009, 12:00 am
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Default Re: Anybody know?

OK, let's be clear. If you want to have a good shot at H1, O1 or J1 visas, you need to be ambitious. The general idea of these is they are for technically skilled individuals, which means you can't afford to put yourself down. Booksmart or not, you're gonna need some qualifications.

You are young, there is plenty of time to develop and build up your skillset and your self-confidence.

But your plan of action should start at home in the UK, aiming high. This will make the opportunities to get to the US much easier to grasp.

If you feel a top university is daunting right now, don't worry, you can work it up slowly. Take your time and get the foundation classes you need to get into a top notch forensics program. The beauty of the UK is that education is affordable and there is no panic.

You need to sit down and find out what the best universities/colleges are in the UK for what you are specifically interested in, and then work backwards from there to see what you need to do to get in.

Additionally, if you really want to do it in the US, now is the time to check and see what qualifications you really need. A British degree, particularly in legal areas, can be potentially useless in the US. You might be better doing mircobiology or psychology or something in the UK with a view to then doing a masters in forensics in the US. I'm not sure how these things break down in this particular area.

The main point is that you need to aim high. Getting a visa is tough and you need to have a convincing background. Fortunately, all you have to do is study hard (booksmart or not) and plan your university or college courses with the right strategy and with a bit of luck you'll be out there in no time at all, on your own merit.

I'll start writing that article later tonight.
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Old Aug 24th 2009, 8:59 am
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by caleyjag View Post

You could study the whole lot in the US, although this will cost you a lot of money.
If you play sport at a reasonable level you may be able to get a Scholarship to study at a US college. I think my brother used an agency - I don't know if this is the best way or not - but everything was arranged from the UK and he got what he desired.
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Old Aug 24th 2009, 11:01 am
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Originally Posted by caleyjag View Post
You might be better doing mircobiology or psychology or something in the UK with a view to then doing a masters in forensics in the US. I'm not sure how these things break down in this particular area.
This is really good advice.

Forensics technically means many different things but the common usage meaning is basically a CSI. Having read your other post it appears you are aiming for a CSI type position and I have to say, point blank, you haven't a chance in hell at a visa for that.

Ok, maybe a snowball's chance in hell, but not much more than that.

The reason is the employers. There are very very very very few non-government forensic labs in the US and there is ('thanks CSI') an overabundance of lab technicians who entered this field of study in the last ten years. The government labs (i.e. the police department) would have to tell the taxpayers a) we're going to spend $5,000-$10,000 of your money to get a visa for b) a foreigner to c) take a job in which there are already too many Americans seeking employment. Do you think there are many politicians that dumb (well, yes, they can be stupid, but not usually on something this cut and dried).

The advice of another degree, something that has more universal appeal, would really help come time for a visa or employment. You can pick up the forensic part later. In fact, I know some lawyers who even specialize in that field (George Washington University Law School has a special group that deals with that). A secondary degree (masters, JD, PhD) in the forensic aspects might satisfy your career interests but still allow you a chance to come into the US in some other way.

The general concept behind technical employment visas is that your presence in the US will lead to additional jobs and work for Americans. You're smart enough to develop a new field of software that will employ other Americans to manage or improve office efficiency so more Americans can work. The basic idea (not always in practice) is that your presence here will make the economy better through new and diverse ideas. Coming over to fill a public service position is not generally within the general scope of the visa scheme.

But I also stick with my earlier advice--come here first on a year transfer from your school. It's quite common and you'll learn far more about America living here one month than visiting for a few weeks every now and then.

Good luck.

Last edited by penguinsix; Aug 24th 2009 at 11:05 am.
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Old Aug 24th 2009, 12:02 pm
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Default Re: Anybody know?

Ok, so I done some research and have found that this Btec will not get me anywhere. Even the university that is in partnership with the college will not accept it!

I quote 'Vocational qualifications (i.e AVCE and BTEC National Diplomas) and non-XX Foundation Degrees are not accepted.'

Despite that, I have to do this course as I practically begged them for the place. If I was to get maximum points there would be a limit on the amount of universities I'd be able to apply for as the higher you go on the University Rankings League Table the more the requirements.

1 Btec ND(highest being 360 Ucas points/DDD) is equal to 3 A-Levels.

For example, for Psychology, Oxford want 3 A-Levels at grade A whereas a lesser known university wants 280 UCAS points from a BTEC ND in a related area, minimum DMM with at least 6 merits in the final year, excluding common skills. Although they are 'equivalent' if I were to apply for Oxford with 360 points from a Btec I wouldn't get a look in.

If I was to do the standard qualifications (A-Levels) after the two years it would be even more time wasted. I guess I should just try to get into somewhere half decent with the Btec and go from there.

I will definitely look into the transfer scheme as I know many universities don't participate in it, now to find one that does.
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