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American culinary terms

American culinary terms

Old Dec 1st 2010, 11:11 pm
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Default American culinary terms

Hello there ,
Well i have been brushing up on my '' idiots guide'' to the U.S books .
And i am steeling myself for the horrors of a american proffessional kitchen
And i cant get my head around the '' one cup of '' flour/ eggs/milk/ breadcrumbs whatever.
How many ounces/grams is ''one cup of ''
What the hell is Cilantro is it Coriander ?
Is suet called suet or something different
Does Custard powder exist ?

Any help on U.S culinary terms would be appreciated

John
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Old Dec 1st 2010, 11:32 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Conversions: http://www.nutribase.com/convert.shtml . Some will help, some will not. Use measuring cups in various sizes (1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4 etc) for dry items like flour and sugar and a measuring cup with a spout and gradations on the side for liquids. I've never been asked for "a cup of eggs" and I have lived in the US for a long time.

Cilantro: Google suggests http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriander which says "The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, Chinese parsley, cilantro (in America, from the Spanish for the plant)."

The only suet I know of is the stuff you put in bird feeders. http://www.ochef.com/657.htm suggests substituting solid vegetable shortening for this rare cooking ingredient.

Custard powder as you know it doesn't exist to my knowledge. Try buying it from UK-food websites in the US or (at the risk of getting flamed by brits) try Jell-o vanilla pudding powder, which may be the closest you'll get.

Last edited by avanutria; Dec 1st 2010 at 11:35 pm.
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Old Dec 1st 2010, 11:34 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by hamlrt View Post
Hello there ,
Well i have been brushing up on my '' idiots guide'' to the U.S books .
And i am steeling myself for the horrors of a american proffessional kitchen
And i cant get my head around the '' one cup of '' flour/ eggs/milk/ breadcrumbs whatever.
How many ounces/grams is ''one cup of ''
What the hell is Cilantro is it Coriander ?
Is suet called suet or something different
Does Custard powder exist ?

Any help on U.S culinary terms would be appreciated

John
One cup = 8oz. liquid or solids (as far as I can tell) nothing I've measured has gone wrong.
Cilantro = Coriander
Suet is minced beef fat, I've not seen it for sale here (except for stupid money in the Brit stores and then for some reason its low fat stuff.) Find a friendly butcher.
Custard powder is a brit thing, but if your working in a professional kitchen cant you make your own? If not Ethnic aisles in most supermarkets sell Birds Custard Powder.

As with most things here google is your friend, there's a recipe thread in the lounge maybe there's lots of answers in there too, good luck, its a nightmare at first, but you soon get used to it.
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Old Dec 1st 2010, 11:55 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Not culinary, but a cautionary tale - putting something "in the bin" means it should go in a storage locker, not in the trash. Luckily I realised my mistake in time
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Old Dec 1st 2010, 11:56 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by traceym View Post
One cup = 8oz. liquid or solids (as far as I can tell) nothing I've measured has gone wrong.
Cilantro = Coriander
Suet is minced beef fat, I've not seen it for sale here (except for stupid money in the Brit stores and then for some reason its low fat stuff.) Find a friendly butcher.
Custard powder is a brit thing, but if your working in a professional kitchen cant you make your own? If not Ethnic aisles in most supermarkets sell Birds Custard Powder.

As with most things here google is your friend, there's a recipe thread in the lounge maybe there's lots of answers in there too, good luck, its a nightmare at first, but you soon get used to it.
Careful. A cup is volume. 8oz liquid but weight varies. the standard conversion for flour is 5oz to the cup. There are some great digital scales, get one and use the British recipes. Suet is the dense fat around the kidneys, these days you have to find a butcher who actually cuts the carcasses.

Birds custard is atrocious, make a real egg custard.
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Old Dec 1st 2010, 11:57 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by paddingtongreen View Post
Careful. A cup is volume. 8oz liquid but weight varies. .
Not in my kitchen, just chuck it in, seems to work!
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 12:04 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by traceym View Post
One cup = 8oz. liquid or solids (as far as I can tell)
Sadly not the case.

A cup of flour for instance is between 4 and 6 ounces depending on the type of flour and how/if you sift it, humidity etc.

A cup of rice can be just as tricky, coming in between 5 and 7 depending on what kind of rice it is.

The list goes on. My advice, by some scales and use a website such as Allrecipes.com to do the conversions.
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 12:07 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by paddingtongreen View Post
Careful. A cup is volume. 8oz liquid but weight varies. the standard conversion for flour is 5oz to the cup. There are some great digital scales, get one and use the British recipes.
Beat me to it. But don't knock all the yank recipe, not all of them call for 'One pack of cake mix' or '3 liters of Velveta'
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 12:08 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by MrEmjoy View Post
Sadly not the case.

A cup of flour for instance is between 4 and 6 ounces depending on the type of flour and how/if you sift it, humidity etc.

A cup of rice can be just as tricky, coming in between 5 and 7 depending on what kind of rice it is.

The list goes on. My advice, by some scales and use a website such as Allrecipes.com to do the conversions.
There see I know nothing, but the only thing I measure / weigh is water and flour for the bread machine as I said everything else is chuck it in, never owned any scales, I use the guessology method
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 12:10 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by traceym View Post
There see I know nothing, but the only thing I measure / weigh is water and flour for the bread machine as I said everything else is chuck it in, never owned any scales, I use the guessology method
As long as you are happy with the results that's OK.

Before I went back to mixing by hand I'd stand over the bread mixer and add a little more flour or water until the dough felt right, which if you're making bread is good to know. Especially if you're guesstimating
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 12:23 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by MrEmjoy View Post
As long as you are happy with the results that's OK.

Before I went back to mixing by hand I'd stand over the bread mixer and add a little more flour or water until the dough felt right, which if you're making bread is good to know. Especially if you're guesstimating
Parents and sister were all chefs its how I've grown up, I really didnt know about the volume liquid thing (mind it sounds a bit too much lice science to me, I was off school the day they did science, ask me one on treacle sponge! )
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 1:16 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

i just weigh if i need ounces - i brought my english scales with me.

Watch out for pint measurements - an English pint is 20fl ounces.
An American pint is 16 fl ounces or 2 cups.

suet - can get from a real butchers (i have gotten it in a packet at the butchers dept in the supermarket - but i had to ask. I grated off what i needed nd froze the rest for later. Nowadays - I just get relatives to bring me atora suet over when i can or buy in emergencies from Amazon.
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 1:53 am
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by hamlrt View Post
Hello there ,
Well i have been brushing up on my '' idiots guide'' to the U.S books .
And i am steeling myself for the horrors of a american proffessional kitchen
And i cant get my head around the '' one cup of '' flour/ eggs/milk/ breadcrumbs whatever.
How many ounces/grams is ''one cup of ''
What the hell is Cilantro is it Coriander ?
Is suet called suet or something different
Does Custard powder exist ?

Any help on U.S culinary terms would be appreciated

John
Have you heard of Google or are you just trying to make conversation?
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 12:29 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by tonrob View Post
Have you heard of Google or are you just trying to make conversation?
Google is no match for hands on experience.

Be nice or the sprout gets it!

Last edited by MrEmjoy; Dec 2nd 2010 at 1:19 pm.
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Old Dec 2nd 2010, 1:01 pm
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Default Re: American culinary terms

Originally Posted by traceym View Post
Cilantro = Coriander
The coriander you will know from the UK is the powdered seed. Cilantro is the chopped leaf.
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