parent citizenship interpreter

Old Oct 20th 2023, 4:19 pm
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Default parent citizenship interpreter

Hi,

My mother just applied for N400 after living here for 16 years, i helped her with application and signed both forms at the end of the online application, called interpreter & preparer, as requested by USCIS.

My question about who can translate for my mom once she gets her interview since she qualifies for it under the 50/15 rule?

can i do the translation of the questions myself as her son?

there was no mention about limitations about family members in the application itself, it just said my mom is responsible for bringing the interpreter

but i also seen this form around Form G-1256 that talks about some inherent bias from the interpreter etc... is this form for other USCIS applications?

any input is appreciated
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Old Oct 20th 2023, 5:13 pm
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Default Re: parent citizenship interpreter

I'm assuming that your mother is living in an area of the US amongst natives of her own country and that is why she hasn't learnt American English in 16 years. Is there someone you like and trust in her community that would go with her to the interview?
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Old Oct 20th 2023, 6:24 pm
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Default Re: parent citizenship interpreter

Originally Posted by john09_2013
Hi,

My mother just applied for N400 after living here for 16 years, i helped her with application and signed both forms at the end of the online application, called interpreter & preparer, as requested by USCIS.

My question about who can translate for my mom once she gets her interview since she qualifies for it under the 50/15 rule?

can i do the translation of the questions myself as her son?

there was no mention about limitations about family members in the application itself, it just said my mom is responsible for bringing the interpreter

but i also seen this form around Form G-1256 that talks about some inherent bias from the interpreter etc... is this form for other USCIS applications?

any input is appreciated
A fair question. I am willing to share my experience from when I was in practice. Examiners would allow it to not allow it. On one occasion, the examiner was one I got along with quite well. I had no objection to the examiner conducting the interview in Korean inasmuch as I trusted her implicitly.
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Old Oct 20th 2023, 6:35 pm
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Default Re: parent citizenship interpreter

unfortunately she only knows people her age, and whom also vast majority dont speak english that well either, and personally i am not very familiar with folks in her community,
the issue is USCIS says she is responsible for bringing an interpreter but i am afraid and i decide to be her interpreter as i did when i filled out the application, they will not like it all of a sudden, although they gave no indication during the filing that its an issue!
i am also wondering if i should hire a lawyer or translator to attend the interview with her, or maybe a friend of mine and have him translate as well, or that will be considered Bias since he knows me!
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Old Oct 21st 2023, 12:37 am
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Default Re: parent citizenship interpreter

My stories:

1. At my Iranian fiance's K-1 visa interview in Istanbul, I translated because their Farsi interpreter was out that day. Halfway through, they realized he could speak Turkish, so they finished with him in Turkish. I also translated for the few Iranians ahead of us in line, so they evidently trusted me!

2. At his Adjustment of status interview in the USA, we hired a Turkish translator (because, like you, I was afraid I wouldn't be allowed). After the interview, the officer noticed my husband and I speaking Farsi together and said that I could have done the translation!

3. By the time of my husband's citizenship interview,his English was good enough not to need a translator.

Rene
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