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25 Year old moving to Spain advice

25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Old Dec 28th 2021, 7:02 am
  #136  
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Default Re: 25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Originally Posted by Daveyboywill View Post
Hi Fred and thanks for the reply,

im a carpenter by trade, nvq level 2 who has also been involved in civil engineering/groundworks for 25yrs plus, started on the ground and have now progressed into management, built houses,schools,hospitals and prisons in the uk. Do you know of any English construction firms that operate in Spain?

thanks.

Dave.
Hi Davey

I'm talking Gibraltar

Below is a Yellow Pages link to the local Construction Industry

https://gibyellow.gi/result?query=co...siness&search=
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Old Dec 28th 2021, 6:24 pm
  #137  
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Default Re: 25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Originally Posted by Moses2013 View Post
Keep your blood pressure down and I just said it's not always that easy after Brexit. HR don't change the law, so why do you think one of the questions is "Are you legally authorized to work in ....."
Have you not heard about the recent frustration with TUI and only candidates with an EU passport can apply. Tom could be highly qualified but it's all down to employment laws in that country.
What about Spain?

In Germany it's now a bit easier:
https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/new...-eu-nationals/The new regulation, which among others makes it possible to gain employment in Germany even in jobs that could be filled by Germans or EU nationals, and permits foreigners to come to Germany for up to half a year to seek work, intends to provide easier access to the German labour market for qualified workers from non-EU countries.

It also aims to increase the numbers of the workforce in Germany, as many positions remain vacant due to a lack of skills and workers.
For any German employment-based visa, one still needs formal qualifications, unless one is going to do an apprenticeship, which would involve attending vocational school in German, requiring at least B2 but in reality an even higher level to be successful.

The six month jobseeker visa does not only require formal qualifications (in case of the original one, a masters degree from a German university or equivalent and five years of relevant experience) but also a place to stay for the duration of the visa and a blocked account at a German bank showing a specific amount of money to cover living expenses during the job search and can only be withdrawn 1/6 of the total amount per month. The job that would let one convert the visa to a residence/work permit has to be a qualified position, at least vaguely connected to the applicant's qualification, not retail, not hospitality, not customer service. Only a few hundred jobseeker visas are issued per year and the most common reason for refusal is: not enough research into the German employment market, German culture, details about what the applicant would do if the jobsearch fails (and the better part of 10K Euro have gone up into smoke), not enough evidence of applying for jobs before applying for the jobseeker visa, etc. It's not an easy visa to get because they don't want the applicant to end up penniless or under a bridge.

Then there is the freelancer visa, the traditional remedy of all things immigration for Americans wanting to live in Berlin, only, one has to be an actual freelancer for this, with multiple clients rather than a remote employer and the visa is limited to one line of work - in most cases: teaching English. I heard that it has become more difficult to get this visa, though and being essentially self-employed and dealing with German bureaucracy, taxes, social contributions and health care on one's own without knowing the local language to a reasonable degree is at the very least stressful.

Bottom line, an employment visa without formal qualifications in Germany is very unlikely. Student visa or apprenticeship visa would be a possibility, but that would require a whole lot of dedication to learning the German language, which I suspect would be a bit much for Tom, who wants to move to Spain, not 9-months-of-November-per-year Germany.

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Old Dec 28th 2021, 6:45 pm
  #138  
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Default Re: 25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Sternchen. Bitte alles lesen und es war nur ein Beispiel. It was already explained in article. In addition, the worker must meet the following conditions in order to be able to legally work in Germany:
  • He/she must have their foreign qualification officially recognised by the relevant authority in Germany.
  • He/she should have a job contract/offer from an employer in Germany, in their field of professionalism.

Training and Skill Development in Germany

Persons who required by a relevant body in Germany to undertake the recognition procedure whilst abroad, and they received a negative answer that their qualification does not completely meet the requirements of a German qualification now have a choice.

They can come to Germany with a visa for Training and Skill Development, under the condition that they have the necessary German language skills, A2 level according to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

A visa as this one, leads to a residence permit valid of 18 months, extendable for another 4 months, and the possibility to apply for a residence permit for training, study or work, by the end of its validity.

Coming to Germany as a Trainee

Non-EU students younger than 25, with a B2 level of German language knowledge and the ability to financially support themselves can seek a training place in Germany due to the new rules.

Last edited by Moses2013; Dec 28th 2021 at 6:49 pm.
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Old Dec 28th 2021, 7:02 pm
  #139  
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Default Re: 25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Originally Posted by Fredbargate View Post
15,000 people 10,000 of them Spanish do so on a daily basis
How many of those qualified for an Article 50 (pre-Brexit) visa?

It's relevant. How many do you *personally* know who did this since Jan 2021?


I'd guess pretty close to, if not, zero. The OP would fall into the same category - those who'd managed to obtain work/residency in the last elven and three quarter months. Everything - and I mean EVERYTHING - that went before this date is irrelevant.


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Old Dec 28th 2021, 7:31 pm
  #140  
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Default Re: 25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Originally Posted by Red_Wine_Fairy View Post
How many of those qualified for an Article 50 (pre-Brexit) visa?

It's relevant. How many do you *personally* know who did this since Jan 2021?


I'd guess pretty close to, if not, zero. The OP would fall into the same category - those who'd managed to obtain work/residency in the last elven and three quarter months. Everything - and I mean EVERYTHING - that went before this date is irrelevant.
What is an Article 50 (pre-Brexit) visa?
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Old Dec 28th 2021, 9:52 pm
  #141  
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Default Re: 25 Year old moving to Spain advice

Originally Posted by Daveyboywill View Post
Hi Fred and thanks for the reply,

im a carpenter by trade, nvq level 2 who has also been involved in civil engineering/groundworks for 25yrs plus, started on the ground and have now progressed into management, built houses,schools,hospitals and prisons in the uk. Do you know of any English construction firms that operate in Spain?

thanks.

Dave.
If it helps, there's the opposite, a directory of Spanish companies with a presence in the UK.

When I wanted a list of British companies in Spain I went to the British Chamber of Commerce in Spain, asked for access to the directory, and copied down addresses. That was a couple of decades ago though, it's probably done differently now.
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