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Language Differences between USA and UK

Language Differences between USA and UK

Old Jun 23rd 2014, 4:21 pm
  #46  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

There is a Randi Ave and a Ponce Ave near us.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 6:32 pm
  #47  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Ponce is another one no-one gets here.

Bugger too. In England its a casual form of exasperation, as in' Oh bugger, I forgot to switch off the iron.' Here it means something a bit different.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 7:16 pm
  #48  
 
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
It's that piece of cardboard and black sharpie that you carry.
The only time I couldn't translate UK to US was once at work. They had moved the left luggage office in T2 at LHR to a portacabin outside the terminal. The American couple who I was trying to direct to it couldn't understand portacabin. I had to phone the wife at work and ask what is American for portacabin, which as we all know is trailer. That solved the problem for them.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 7:50 pm
  #49  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by Karrie72 View Post
Ponce is another one no-one gets here.

Bugger too. In England its a casual form of exasperation, as in' Oh bugger, I forgot to switch off the iron.' Here it means something a bit different.
Ya daft bugger

I muttered something about a 'big pansy' under my breath once and my son thought it was great , not sure if they use that here.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 9:30 pm
  #50  
 
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by windsong View Post
Now that I am moving back to the UK next month, I wonder what "reverse" language differences I will notice. When I first moved to the USA I was teaching, and the students often laughed at some of the things I said - in a nice way - so we agreed I'd teach them English and they would teach me American. The example that comes to mind is "eraser" and "rubber"!

Maybe now that I am going back to the UK, there are certain Americanisms I should avoid. Can you think of any?
Every other sentence needs to include the word "brilliant".
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 10:03 pm
  #51  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
Every other sentence needs to include the word "brilliant".
Makes a change from "awesome".
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 10:05 pm
  #52  
 
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by Novocastrian View Post
Makes a change from "awesome".
Same difference and equally irritating!
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 10:10 pm
  #53  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
Same difference and equally irritating!
Totally.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 10:14 pm
  #54  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

I am definitely not going to miss the Bostonians description of everything being "wicked"or "wicked pissa".
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 10:25 pm
  #55  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by Novocastrian View Post
Makes a change from "awesome".
Ahsome.
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Old Jun 24th 2014, 5:33 am
  #56  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

If you don't want to cook or eat out in a restaurant then you order a take-away, not a take out.

'Going forward' means to physically move oneself along a little by some means It does not mean in the future or from now on. 'In the future' means in the future. 'From now on' means from now on.
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Old Jun 24th 2014, 9:36 am
  #57  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by BEVS View Post
If you don't want to cook or eat out in a restaurant then you order a take-away, not a take out.
I didn't realise I was using 'odd' terminology until last year back in the UK and I suggested to my sister about getting take out and she looked confused and I had to explain what I meant. However, she's a bit strange so maybe it was just her
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Old Jun 24th 2014, 6:12 pm
  #58  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by Sally Redux View Post
Ya daft bugger

I muttered something about a 'big pansy' under my breath once and my son thought it was great , not sure if they use that here.
My Mum is always calling someone a 'silly buggar' or some such. She is 87 and hasn't given up any of her British sayings for all the time she has been in Canada.

I use to use 'pansy' all the time 'what a pansy'. Now it would be considered homophobic so best not to be used anymore.

When we first came to Canada my Mum was at the neighbours and they were making plans for the next day, my Mum said to the neighbour 'come and knock me up in the morning', after having a giggle at this the neighbour explained what it meant here, needless to say my Mum never used that expression again.

Another difference is the spelling of words for example Mum they spell it Mom here. I actually had someone ask me what Mum meant.
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Old Jun 25th 2014, 1:16 am
  #59  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by backtomypast View Post
My Mum is always calling someone a 'silly buggar' or some such. She is 87 and hasn't given up any of her British sayings for all the time she has been in Canada.

I use to use 'pansy' all the time 'what a pansy'. Now it would be considered homophobic so best not to be used anymore.

When we first came to Canada my Mum was at the neighbours and they were making plans for the next day, my Mum said to the neighbour 'come and knock me up in the morning', after having a giggle at this the neighbour explained what it meant here, needless to say my Mum never used that expression again.

Another difference is the spelling of words for example Mum they spell it Mom here. I actually had someone ask me what Mum meant.
There are some new (to me) ones in England. Apparently 'nosh' means more than eating now.

I know this because hilarity ensued when my mum sent a card to my nephew saying, "Happy Birthday, hope you have a good nosh!"
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Old Jun 25th 2014, 1:42 am
  #60  
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Default Re: Language Differences between USA and UK

Originally Posted by backtomypast View Post

Another difference is the spelling of words for example Mum they spell it Mom here. I actually had someone ask me what Mum meant.
Depends on where in the UK. People from The Midlands use Mom.
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