U.S citizen relocating to Canada

Old Sep 30th 2008, 8:10 pm
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Default U.S citizen relocating to Canada

how can a U.S citizen work in Canada?

A question from a friend.

She is in Canada with BUNAC, her American husband is in California.
He works in Construction but would like to go into working in security.

Any help/advise would be greatly appretiated for my friend.

Can he not apply for a work visa WITHOUT a job offer??

I have looked everywhere but cannot find answer for my friend.
her main concern is a work visa so he can work in canada.

thanks

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Old Sep 30th 2008, 9:16 pm
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Default Re: U.S citizen relocating to Canada

Originally Posted by atandy
She is in Canada with BUNAC, her American husband is in California.
I thought one was not eligible for BUNAC if one was married, but I may be mistaken about that. Besides that, it's irrelevant to your question, so perhaps I shouldn't have gone off on a tangent.

He works in Construction but would like to go into working in security.
Unless he has sophisticated skills in the security arena, construction would be more promising from every point of view (the money it would pay, the chances that it would help him to get a visa to work in Canada, etc.).

Can he not apply for a work visa WITHOUT a job offer??
Essentially, no.

If your friend's husband was a skilled tradesman (electrician or plumber, for example) and if he had enough post-apprenticeship experience under his belt, he would be able to come to Canada, do the Red Seal challenge exam, and qualify for that trade in Canada.

Note that some provinces, such as Alberta, are more flexible when it comes to carpentry. Carpenters in those provinces do not have to pass the Red Seal exam, but must satisfy an employer that they have relevant experience and skills.

If he applied for a job in a province in which there was a shortage of people in the relevant occupation, he would be able to get a temporary work permit or perhaps apply for permanent residence via one of the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs).

Unless your husband's friend had advanced skills in the security field, he would be able to find only a low paying job as a security guard in a shopping mall or something. A security guard was listed as an Occupation under Pressure in Alberta last time I checked, so might be a way for him to get his foot in the door, so to speak.

However, since I don't know where in Canada your friend currently lives, I don't know how useful that would be to her. But I suppose that, if she's in Canada on BUNAC, she has a certain amount of flexibility as to where she can live.

For information about work in the security arena in Canada, see the Wiki article called Security Services-Canada.

For information about the skilled trades, see the Wiki article called Skilled Trades-Canada. There also are sub-forums for electricians and plumbers in the Working Abroad by Profession forum.

Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), there are provisions that make it easier for business people and certain degreed professionals who are citizens of Canada, the United States and Mexico to work temporarily in each others' countries. Here is Chapter 16 Part 2 of NAFTA. Scroll down to Appendix 1603.D.1, which lists eligible professions.

It doesn't sound to me as if your friend's husband would be eligible. I've pointed NAFTA out to you, just in case you hear someone floating out the term and you think I've omited it.

The Wiki article called Quick Guide to Canadian Immigration will explain a bit more about the basic ways that your friend's husband could get into this country. I've already mentioned them to you. They are a temporary work permit (which later can be upgraded to permanent residence status) or an application for permanent residence via one of the PNPs. However, the article will give you links to further Wiki articles and government websites.

Hope that helps.
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Old Sep 30th 2008, 9:24 pm
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Default Re: U.S citizen relocating to Canada

Oh yes, I have a vague recollection of seeing somewhere that Americans also can come to Canada on working holiday visas (WHVs). Also, and again this is a vague recollection, I seem to remember seeing that they could come for six months rather than twelve months (as British citizens can). As I understand it, these WHVs operate on a quota system. If there is indeed a WHV scheme for Americans, I suspect it's too late to apply now for 2008. I'm guessing one would have to wait until applications open up for 2009. Just a guess.
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Old Sep 30th 2008, 9:30 pm
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Default Re: U.S citizen relocating to Canada

Originally Posted by Judy in Calgary
I thought one was not eligible for BUNAC if one was married, but I may be mistaken about that. Besides that, it's irrelevant to your question, so perhaps I shouldn't have gone off on a tangent.

Unless he has sophisticated skills in the security arena, construction would be more promising from every point of view (the money it would pay, the chances that it would help him to get a visa to work in Canada, etc.).

Essentially, no.

If your friend's husband was a skilled tradesman (electrician or plumber, for example) and if he had enough post-apprenticeship experience under his belt, he would be able to come to Canada, do the Red Seal challenge exam, and qualify for that trade in Canada.

Note that some provinces, such as Alberta, are more flexible when it comes to carpentry. Carpenters in those provinces do not have to pass the Red Seal exam, but must satisfy an employer that they have relevant experience and skills.

If he applied for a job in a province in which there was a shortage of people in the relevant occupation, he would be able to get a temporary work permit or perhaps apply for permanent residence via one of the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs).

Unless your husband's friend had advanced skills in the security field, he would be able to find only a low paying job as a security guard in a shopping mall or something. A security guard was listed as an Occupation under Pressure in Alberta last time I checked, so might be a way for him to get his foot in the door, so to speak.

However, since I don't know where in Canada your friend currently lives, I don't know how useful that would be to her. But I suppose that, if she's in Canada on BUNAC, she has a certain amount of flexibility as to where she can live.

For information about work in the security arena in Canada, see the Wiki article called Security Services-Canada.

For information about the skilled trades, see the Wiki article called Skilled Trades-Canada. There also are sub-forums for electricians and plumbers in the Working Abroad by Profession forum.

Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), there are provisions that make it easier for business people and certain degreed professionals who are citizens of Canada, the United States and Mexico to work temporarily in each others' countries. Here is Chapter 16 Part 2 of NAFTA. Scroll down to Appendix 1603.D.1, which lists eligible professions.

It doesn't sound to me as if your friend's husband would be eligible. I've pointed NAFTA out to you, just in case you hear someone floating out the term and you think I've omited it.

The Wiki article called Quick Guide to Canadian Immigration will explain a bit more about the basic ways that your friend's husband could get into this country. I've already mentioned them to you. They are a temporary work permit (which later can be upgraded to permanent residence status) or an application for permanent residence via one of the PNPs. However, the article will give you links to further Wiki articles and government websites.

Hope that helps.
x
HI Judy thanks!

before she went to Canada on BUNAC she took a trip to the states and met and married her husband. she did not stay and file for AOS, because she had BUNAC and had her ticket booked already.

So she has the best of both worlds I supposed because she is applying for PR right now and has added her husband on the application AND at the same time HE has filed for a spousal visa for the U.S in case Candad does not work out for them
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