Some basic questions

Old Jan 17th 2003, 5:12 pm
  #1  
Keegan Alex
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Default Some basic questions

Hello.

I have a few basic questions that hopefully aren't too obvious.

First, here's some background. I'm in my mid-20's and born in the US.
I've got a Jr. College Degree in Computer Networking, and I've worked at
the same place for 5 years under my degree... so lots of experience in
what I do.

I'm not married, so I'd like to experience living in Canada while single.
Whether I say permanently or not time will tell, but I hope to stay at
least 5 years if PR is granted.

Now, my questions. If I am granted PR, do I need to find a job in Canada
during the PR process or after all is said and done? Also, would I be
giving up my US citizenship? I just want to verify I can come back to the
US with no problems down the road.

Here's a crazy question... how do taxes work? Do I still need to file in
the US if I work in Canada?

Once PR is grated, does that make one a full fledge citizen? Are there
any things that couldn't be done that native born Canadians can do?

As for health insurance, I've read that Canada has a national health
insurance. As anyone in the US is used to, health insurance has to either
be purchased on one's own or through the employer. How's that work in
Canada?

And finally, what's the view of folks that move to Canada from other
countries by native born Canadians? I know there can be some prejudices
in the US toward folks that move here from other countries, but I wasn't
sure if the same thing is common in Canada.

Well, that's it for now. Most of my questions were answered by the
Canadan government websites and this newsgroup, but the above were a few I
couldn't find answers to.

Thanks for any information, and take care,

Keegan.
 
Old Jan 18th 2003, 1:37 am
  #2  
Haider Kazmi
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Default Re: Some basic questions

    > Now, my questions. If I am granted PR, do I need to find a job in Canada
    > during the PR process or after all is said and done? Also, would I be
    > giving up my US citizenship? I just want to verify I can come back to the
    > US with no problems down the road.
Not really, you can stay without a job if you feel. I am not 100% sure on
this, but you can have dual citizenship in US and Canada, so you wont be
giving up your US passport


    > Here's a crazy question... how do taxes work? Do I still need to file in
    > the US if I work in Canada?
You only pay taxes where you live, but you better let IRS know you are not
living in US anymore. So you pay taxes here in Canada

    > Once PR is grated, does that make one a full fledge citizen? Are there
    > any things that couldn't be done that native born Canadians can do?
No, you have almost all the rights except voting in the federal elections.
You have to apply for citizenship about 4yrs after you have moved to canada,
and lived their for the four years or so.

    > As for health insurance, I've read that Canada has a national health
    > insurance. As anyone in the US is used to, health insurance has to either
    > be purchased on one's own or through the employer. How's that work in
    > Canada?
Health insurance does not cover dental and drugs for most people. You still
need to take out an insurance on those. Health insurance only pays for
doctor consultation and surgery and stuff. Also it expires in 6 months from
leaving a particular province.

    > And finally, what's the view of folks that move to Canada from other
    > countries by native born Canadians? I know there can be some prejudices
    > in the US toward folks that move here from other countries, but I wasn't
    > sure if the same thing is common in Canada.
Nope, no prejudices, thats definately a US thing. Havn't you heard Canadians
are nice polite people Anyway, I moved from India in 96, I love the
country and love the people, they are absolutely amazing.
 
Old Jan 18th 2003, 4:42 am
  #3  
Stephen C. Gallagher
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Some basic questions

    > > Now, my questions. If I am granted PR, do I need to find a job in
Canada
    > > during the PR process or after all is said and done? Also, would I be
    > > giving up my US citizenship? I just want to verify I can come back to
the
    > > US with no problems down the road.
    > Not really, you can stay without a job if you feel. I am not 100% sure on
    > this, but you can have dual citizenship in US and Canada, so you wont be
    > giving up your US passport

Keep in mind that permanent resident status is not the
same as citizenship. Being granted PR status in Canada
does not affect US citizenship at all. After living in Canada for
three years, a person can apply for Canadian citizenship
if he wishes. It's a not a requirement. He can remain a permanent
resident. Taking Canadian citizenship as the potential to cause
loss of US citizenship, but only if the person's intention is
to give up his US citizenship. If the person intends to keep his
US citizenship then it is not lost (note: I am a US citizen who
has moved to Canada and who naturalized as a Canadian.
Since my intention was to keep my US citizenship, it means
that I now have both citizenships (ie. dual citizenship).

    > > Here's a crazy question... how do taxes work? Do I still need to file
in
    > > the US if I work in Canada?
    > You only pay taxes where you live, but you better let IRS know you are not
    > living in US anymore. So you pay taxes here in Canada

That's not 100% correct. While Canada and most other countries will
tax primarily based on the basis of residence (where you live) or
source of the income (where the income originated), the US also
chooses to tax the the worldwide income of all US citizens,
even if they don't live in the US, and even if the income is not
from US sources.

However, there are exemptions and credits for a US citizen
who lives and works abroad to eliminate the US taxes due.

In general, this means that most US citizens who live and work
in Canada DO have to file a US tax return each year, but they
don't actually pay any US tax. Keep in mind that this is only
a generalization. There are scenarios where a US citizen
living and working abroad does have to pay US income tax.

As a resident of Canada, a US citizen living there must
pay Canadian tax on his worldwide income.

    > > Once PR is grated, does that make one a full fledge citizen? Are there
    > > any things that couldn't be done that native born Canadians can do?
    > No, you have almost all the rights except voting in the federal elections.
    > You have to apply for citizenship about 4yrs after you have moved to
canada,
    > and lived their for the four years or so.

You don't have to apply for Canadian citizenship.
You can apply if you wish, but it's not required.
And, you can apply for Canadian citizenship after three years
as a permanent resident, not four.

    > >
    > > As for health insurance, I've read that Canada has a national health
    > > insurance. As anyone in the US is used to, health insurance has to
either
    > > be purchased on one's own or through the employer. How's that work in
    > > Canada?

Each province administers it's own health insurance program
in compliance with the Canada Health Act. In all provinces,
except for Alberta and BC, there is no direct charge for this
coverage. Alberta and BC do have a premium that must be
paid for the coverage, although some employers will pay this
premium as a benefit.

You must sign up for your provincial health insurance after
you become a resident.

    > Health insurance does not cover dental and drugs for most people. You
still
    > need to take out an insurance on those. Health insurance only pays for
    > doctor consultation and surgery and stuff.

Again, many employers provide dental, supplemental medical,
and drug coverage. But, otherwise, you do have to pay for it yourself.
It tends to be more affordable than similar coverage in the US.

Stephen Gallagher
 

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