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The most important thing: Language

The most important thing: Language

Old Nov 27th 2004, 3:31 am
  #1  
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Exclamation The most important thing: Language

It has been almost a year and a half since I came to Canada. I have never regreted taking that decision, not even for a fraction of a second.

The first week I came I went to a "job seach workshop" (there are tons), and I was suprised by the level of English of the other immigrants. I am not that great at English but the level of the others was very low. There were PHDs MsSC, Engineers, very highly skilled people among us.

I went out to look for jobs and I was happy to see that if I applied what I just learned in the workshop I could find a job. I got some calls, went to some interviews and I was lucky enough to get a job after 3 weeks of being in Canada.

In the group that took the workshop with me there were people working in Factories, Supermarkets,etc some of them for quite a while. There were people that had gone to their 3rd or 4th workshop without results.

Some of the immigrants in the group had a higher preparation than me but the problem was that they could not communicate their skills in an effective way.

If they are called to an interview and they can not communicate well, it is obvious that they will not be hired, many of the companies have phone interviews first.

What I am trying to say is that the immigration system should put a lot more weight in the Language skills than in the Degrees.

It's false that the Language can be learned easily for this type of immigrants. People need to work to survive, and working in a Factory will not improve their English in any way, and they will be too tired to study after work.

If you come with a College degree and a good level of English you can get an entry level job (not a survival job) and study an MBA or whatever you want to do to improve your career.

The immigration system should change in this regard. Otherwise we are going to keep hearing sad stories about highly skilled people working as Taxi drivers or people returning to their country of origin.
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Old Nov 27th 2004, 4:11 am
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Default Re: The most important thing: Language

I agree language is an important aspect.
But look into canadian immigration system , maximum immigrants are from PRC who proudly say I NO NO ENGLISH ( Instead of I Know no English) ,but they are proudly manning the information desk ( even in Hospitals).
Whereas tons of IELTS 7 to 8 out of 10 are available, thanks to CIC they are waiting and waiting only.

Ianik I hope you are reading.


Originally Posted by Allinall
It has been almost a year and a half since I came to Canada. I have never regreted taking that decision, not even for a fraction of a second.

The first week I came I went to a "job seach workshop" (there are tons), and I was suprised by the level of English of the other immigrants. I am not that great at English but the level of the others was very low. There were PHDs MsSC, Engineers, very highly skilled people among us.

I went out to look for jobs and I was happy to see that if I applied what I just learned in the workshop I could find a job. I got some calls, went to some interviews and I was lucky enough to get a job after 3 weeks of being in Canada.

In the group that took the workshop with me there were people working in Factories, Supermarkets,etc some of them for quite a while. There were people that had gone to their 3rd or 4th workshop without results.

Some of the immigrants in the group had a higher preparation than me but the problem was that they could not communicate their skills in an effective way.

If they are called to an interview and they can not communicate well, it is obvious that they will not be hired, many of the companies have phone interviews first.

What I am trying to say is that the immigration system should put a lot more weight in the Language skills than in the Degrees.

It's false that the Language can be learned easily for this type of immigrants. People need to work to survive, and working in a Factory will not improve their English in any way, and they will be too tired to study after work.

If you come with a College degree and a good level of English you can get an entry level job (not a survival job) and study an MBA or whatever you want to do to improve your career.

The immigration system should change in this regard. Otherwise we are going to keep hearing sad stories about highly skilled people working as Taxi drivers or people returning to their country of origin.
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Old Nov 27th 2004, 6:48 am
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Default Re: The most important thing: Language

Hi Allinall,
Good to know things are working out well for you. Keep the posts coming, its like a glimmer of hope in an otherwsie bleak scenario (at least as painted on the lifestyle forum).
Thx
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Old Nov 27th 2004, 11:02 am
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Default Re: The most important thing: Language

And right you are Allinall , couldn't agree more.
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