Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

Old Oct 23rd 2002, 1:04 pm
  #1  
M C
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Posts: n/a
Default Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

I am in a unique situation. Your input will be greatly appreciated.

I am an Indian citizen working in US on H1. I have applied for both
Canadian and US PR. I have recently been informed that my Canadian
PR was accepted and that I should mail my passport for VISA printing.

Will a Canadian immigrant VISA in my passport affect my chances for
a successful US Consular processing? Will my Green Card be denied?

Please advice.

Thanks a lot.
mahidhar
 
Old Oct 23rd 2002, 4:30 pm
  #2  
Burak Ataman
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

Just another one, stealing time of the immigration system....
How can you see, having a new life like shopping? Did you also apply for
Australia?
Germany is also taking good IT people if you are in IT, I suggest try also
Germany...
When you have acceptance from every country then you can decide or maybe
roll the dice.


"m c" wrote in message
news:8426d254.0210231704-
[email protected]
...
    > I am in a unique situation. Your input will be greatly appreciated.
    > I am an Indian citizen working in US on H1. I have applied for both
    > Canadian and US PR. I have recently been informed that my Canadian
    > PR was accepted and that I should mail my passport for VISA printing.
    > Will a Canadian immigrant VISA in my passport affect my chances for
    > a successful US Consular processing? Will my Green Card be denied?
    > Please advice.
    > Thanks a lot.
    > mahidhar
 
Old Oct 23rd 2002, 7:15 pm
  #3  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 145
levu is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

So what you're saying is that you applied to Canada only as a backup and what you really want is to live in the US.

Considering the great number of people who are passionate about Canada who are waiting years to get a visa you should feel ashamed of yourself. To you, Canada is second best. You're an insult to the generosity of the Canadian people. They've made you the greatest offer you'll ever recieve in your life and you have the audacity/arrogrance to hesitate because you want something you think is even more valuable.

You have no business going to Canada, if the US doesn't want you, then go back to India.
levu is offline  
Old Oct 23rd 2002, 9:05 pm
  #4  
Sbm
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

You may get your U.S. Green Card later, but in the end you have to
forgo one of them - it is impossible to maintain both the PRs.

BTW - will you post your timeline for Canadian PR (application date,
AOR, Assessment, Medicals etc.)?

Thanks.



[email protected] (m c) wrote in message news:...
    > I am in a unique situation. Your input will be greatly appreciated.
    > I am an Indian citizen working in US on H1. I have applied for both
    > Canadian and US PR. I have recently been informed that my Canadian
    > PR was accepted and that I should mail my passport for VISA printing.
    > Will a Canadian immigrant VISA in my passport affect my chances for
    > a successful US Consular processing? Will my Green Card be denied?
    > Please advice.
    > Thanks a lot.
    > mahidhar
 
Old Oct 24th 2002, 3:30 am
  #5  
M C
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

my timeline:

Applied: July 2001
AOR: Oct 2001
Assesment: May 2002
Medicals: July 2002
Letter to send additional photos: Aug 2002
Request for passport: Oct 2002
 
Old Oct 24th 2002, 9:59 am
  #6  
Hani
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

Burak,
In the world we are living in, everything is possible. Who would have
ever thought of, say, 9/11? Or, of CIC changing the rules of the game
after thousands of applicants had already paid money and planned
according to old rules?
In such a world where uncertainty prevails, I think it is wise for a
person in need of a PR to apply for more than one. And yes, when you
get acceptance for more than one, *you* would decide which one to take
and throw away the others.
If you have a problem with this approach (though I wonder how people
"shopping" for PR's can place a direct burden on you), then don't do
it. You don't need to be sarcastic about it.

I am not personally using this approach. I only applied for Canadinan
PR myself. But this guy's approach seems feasible (if one can
financially afford it) in such uncertain times, especially when one
has family responsibilities. It is very simple: you apply for two, if
one fails, you might have a chance with the other one ... you never
know ..

Resfectfully,
Hani.

"Burak Ataman" wrote in message news:...
    > Just another one, stealing time of the immigration system....
    > How can you see, having a new life like shopping? Did you also apply for
    > Australia?
    > Germany is also taking good IT people if you are in IT, I suggest try also
    > Germany...
    > When you have acceptance from every country then you can decide or maybe
    > roll the dice.
    > "m c" wrote in message
    > news:8426d254.02102317-
    > [email protected]
    ...
    > > I am in a unique situation. Your input will be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > I am an Indian citizen working in US on H1. I have applied for both
    > > Canadian and US PR. I have recently been informed that my Canadian
    > > PR was accepted and that I should mail my passport for VISA printing.
    > >
    > > Will a Canadian immigrant VISA in my passport affect my chances for
    > > a successful US Consular processing? Will my Green Card be denied?
    > >
    > > Please advice.
    > >
    > > Thanks a lot.
    > > mahidhar
 
Old Oct 24th 2002, 3:45 pm
  #7  
Chris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

Sorry to disappoint you, but your point of view can only get sympathy from
people in the same boat with you, so OUTSIDE Canada, and the vast majority
of those asking questions in this forum are outside Canada (mostly in the
States and mostly from East-Indies countries), from immigrants relatively
new in this country, from immigration activists and other sort of activists,
Greenpeace mentality for instance, from those with socialist views. But from
those born in this country, especially the hard-core Canadians, or from
those immigrants who have FULLY integrated into the Canadian society, and
becoming a Canadian citizen should make the difference between indifference
and responsibility, devotion, patriotism, you will NEVER get approval of
your views. A true Canadian will always put Canada's interests first, for a
true Canadian Canada has no equal, and when you bring-up the idea of
"shopping" for residency in the Western world, either is Canada, US,
Australia or any Western-European country, I don't think you will get many
Canadians to agree with you. To give you an example, let's say you apply for
a job at the company X, you show-up for the interview professionally very
well prepared, but during the interview you will open-up and tell the
interviewer that you also have applied for the same position at the company
Y, Z and W. You justify yourself by arguing that 'more applications to
different companies, the better chances to land yourself a job'. I can
assure you that, despite your professional qualifications, you will fail the
interview. Companies are looking for candidates that, besides professional
qualifications, will bring along a desire to make that particular company
their place of retirement, stability in other words. But telling to the
interviewer that you are shopping around for a workplace, you will in fact
let that person see in you somebody who has no major interest in working for
that particular company X, that any time you can leave the company, so why
investing in you time and money, and they will finally choose the right
candidate for that job. And that one unfortunately won't be you!
I wish you best of luck in your attempt to settle permanently in the Western
world, Canada in particular, but I can assure you that once you will get
down here you will soon realize that things are quite different than of
those expressed by the most of the contributors in this forum who, by the
way, have never been or lived in Canada!
Chris in Toronto

"Hani" wrote in message
news:211565ac.0210241359-
[email protected]
...
    > Burak,
    > In the world we are living in, everything is possible. Who would have
    > ever thought of, say, 9/11? Or, of CIC changing the rules of the game
    > after thousands of applicants had already paid money and planned
    > according to old rules?
    > In such a world where uncertainty prevails, I think it is wise for a
    > person in need of a PR to apply for more than one. And yes, when you
    > get acceptance for more than one, *you* would decide which one to take
    > and throw away the others.
    > If you have a problem with this approach (though I wonder how people
    > "shopping" for PR's can place a direct burden on you), then don't do
    > it. You don't need to be sarcastic about it.
    > I am not personally using this approach. I only applied for Canadinan
    > PR myself. But this guy's approach seems feasible (if one can
    > financially afford it) in such uncertain times, especially when one
    > has family responsibilities. It is very simple: you apply for two, if
    > one fails, you might have a chance with the other one ... you never
    > know ..
    > Resfectfully,
    > Hani.
    > "Burak Ataman" wrote in message
news:...
    > > Just another one, stealing time of the immigration system....
    > > How can you see, having a new life like shopping? Did you also apply for
    > > Australia?
    > > Germany is also taking good IT people if you are in IT, I suggest try
also
    > > Germany...
    > > When you have acceptance from every country then you can decide or maybe
    > > roll the dice.
    > >
    > >
    > > "m c" wrote in message
    > > news:8426d254.021023-
    > > [email protected]
    ...
    > > > I am in a unique situation. Your input will be greatly appreciated.
    > > >
    > > > I am an Indian citizen working in US on H1. I have applied for both
    > > > Canadian and US PR. I have recently been informed that my Canadian
    > > > PR was accepted and that I should mail my passport for VISA printing.
    > > >
    > > > Will a Canadian immigrant VISA in my passport affect my chances for
    > > > a successful US Consular processing? Will my Green Card be denied?
    > > >
    > > > Please advice.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks a lot.
    > > > mahidhar
 
Old Oct 24th 2002, 8:40 pm
  #8  
Jaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

With respect, your example is totally wrong.

Many (most?) people looking for jobs will apply to more than one
company. And prospective employers know it. It generally doesn't
come up at interviews, but if it does, no worries.

If I was recruiting, I'd expect candidates to have applied for other
jobs too.

Now of course, once a job offer's been made and accepted, and the new
person has joined the team, then it's a different story. But at the
application stage, where there's no commitment on the part of either
side, it's accepted that candidates will apply to more than one
company, just as employers will interview more than one candidate.

Jeremy

    >On Thu, 24 Oct 2002 23:45:57 -0400, "Chris" wrote:
    >To give you an example, let's say you apply for
    >a job at the company X, you show-up for the interview professionally very
    >well prepared, but during the interview you will open-up and tell the
    >interviewer that you also have applied for the same position at the company
    >Y, Z and W. You justify yourself by arguing that 'more applications to
    >different companies, the better chances to land yourself a job'. I can
    >assure you that, despite your professional qualifications, you will fail the
    >interview. Companies are looking for candidates that, besides professional
    >qualifications, will bring along a desire to make that particular company
    >their place of retirement, stability in other words. But telling to the
    >interviewer that you are shopping around for a workplace, you will in fact
    >let that person see in you somebody who has no major interest in working for
    >that particular company X, that any time you can leave the company, so why
    >investing in you time and money, and they will finally choose the right
    >candidate for that job. And that one unfortunately won't be you!
    >I wish you best of luck in your attempt to settle permanently in the Western
    >world, Canada in particular, but I can assure you that once you will get
    >down here you will soon realize that things are quite different than of
    >those expressed by the most of the contributors in this forum who, by the
    >way, have never been or lived in Canada!
    >Chris in Toronto
 
Old Oct 26th 2002, 2:03 am
  #9  
Chris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

Hi Jeremy, maybe my example was a little, or way off, but what I wanted to
say is that, if you go to an interview with the company X and during that
interview you are going to emphasize that even you are accepted for that job
you intend to continue working for your current employer, company Y, until
the contract with company Y is over, well, I cannot see that the interviewer
at the comp. X will agree with your conditions and let you come and start
working at X. You either start working for X as soon as you were told to, or
you do not start working at all at X. Not saying that the interviewer at X
could have been interviewed somebody else, somebody with a special desire to
work for X, instead of you who have no intention to bring all your human and
professional assets to comp. X only. So, the interviewer just wasted his/her
time with you, maybe he/she got upset, and because of that he/she would fail
the next candidate (s). It's human, isn't?
The same with shopping for residence, you apply for Canadian PR, nobody
forces you to do it, but if you get approved, show some respect for the
people/system/country that gave you the green light, quit your
previous/current affairs/jobs and bring all your assets, qualifications, to
Canada. Or, don't apply now and do it only when you are ready to come to
Canada and let somebody else come here (I am talking about that huge Buffalo
line-up).
And my personal example, I was in Sweden in 1989, in a political camp, I
could have applied to immigrate to Australia, NZ, South-Africa or US, but I
chosen Canada only, so I applied for Canada only, and two months after I
received my visa I was already in Toronto. And when did I leave Canada first
time? Couple of days after I became Canadian citizen, a drive to
Buffalo/Rochester, NY. Is there anything weird in my kind of approach?
Have a great weekend!
Chris

"JAJ" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
net.au
...
    > With respect, your example is totally wrong.
    > Many (most?) people looking for jobs will apply to more than one
    > company. And prospective employers know it. It generally doesn't
    > come up at interviews, but if it does, no worries.
    > If I was recruiting, I'd expect candidates to have applied for other
    > jobs too.
    > Now of course, once a job offer's been made and accepted, and the new
    > person has joined the team, then it's a different story. But at the
    > application stage, where there's no commitment on the part of either
    > side, it's accepted that candidates will apply to more than one
    > company, just as employers will interview more than one candidate.
    > Jeremy
    > >On Thu, 24 Oct 2002 23:45:57 -0400, "Chris"
wrote:
    > >To give you an example, let's say you apply for
    > >a job at the company X, you show-up for the interview professionally very
    > >well prepared, but during the interview you will open-up and tell the
    > >interviewer that you also have applied for the same position at the
company
    > >Y, Z and W. You justify yourself by arguing that 'more applications to
    > >different companies, the better chances to land yourself a job'. I can
    > >assure you that, despite your professional qualifications, you will fail
the
    > >interview. Companies are looking for candidates that, besides
professional
    > >qualifications, will bring along a desire to make that particular company
    > >their place of retirement, stability in other words. But telling to the
    > >interviewer that you are shopping around for a workplace, you will in
fact
    > >let that person see in you somebody who has no major interest in working
for
    > >that particular company X, that any time you can leave the company, so
why
    > >investing in you time and money, and they will finally choose the right
    > >candidate for that job. And that one unfortunately won't be you!
    > >I wish you best of luck in your attempt to settle permanently in the
Western
    > >world, Canada in particular, but I can assure you that once you will get
    > >down here you will soon realize that things are quite different than of
    > >those expressed by the most of the contributors in this forum who, by the
    > >way, have never been or lived in Canada!
    > >Chris in Toronto
 
Old Oct 26th 2002, 10:12 am
  #10  
Jaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Help - Canada PR affecting US PR?

Hi Christian

    >On Sat, 26 Oct 2002 10:03:47 -0400, "Chris" wrote:
    >Hi Jeremy, maybe my example was a little, or way off, but what I wanted to
    >say is that, if you go to an interview with the company X and during that
    >interview you are going to emphasize that even you are accepted for that job
    >you intend to continue working for your current employer, company Y, until
    >the contract with company Y is over,

It's quite common for senior executives to have lengthy notice periods
written into their contracts, which forces a time lag between them
accepting a new job and actually going to work there.



    >well, I cannot see that the interviewer
    >at the comp. X will agree with your conditions and let you come and start
    >working at X. You either start working for X as soon as you were told to, or
    >you do not start working at all at X.

Depends on what the market conditions are.



    >Not saying that the interviewer at X
    >could have been interviewed somebody else, somebody with a special desire to
    >work for X, instead of you who have no intention to bring all your human and
    >professional assets to comp. X only. So, the interviewer just wasted his/her
    >time with you, maybe he/she got upset, and because of that he/she would fail
    >the next candidate (s). It's human, isn't?



Recruitment is a cynical exercise, and interviewers shouldn't get
upset at things like that. They still get paid at the end of the day
themselves



    >The same with shopping for residence, you apply for Canadian PR, nobody
    >forces you to do it, but if you get approved, show some respect for the
    >people/system/country that gave you the green light, quit your
    >previous/current affairs/jobs and bring all your assets, qualifications, to
    >Canada. Or, don't apply now and do it only when you are ready to come to
    >Canada and let somebody else come here (I am talking about that huge Buffalo
    >line-up).


Nice theory. It would be reasonable to expect this if applications
could be finalised in a few months.

But it is not reasonable to expect people to sit around 'ready and
able' to move to Canada at a moment's notice for 1, 2 or maybe 3+
years while CIC gets round to looking at their application.

There's also the problem that peoples circumstances change during such
a lengthy processing period. They might have been 'ready, willing and
able' when they applied, but 1 year into the process a new contract
comes up. What are they supposed to do? Refuse it and wait around
for an indeterminate period while CIC gets around to looking at their
application?

And don't blame the 'flood' of applications. CIC are in control of
the system. Every week they saw how many applications were coming in
compared to the number of visas they had available (and the resources
they had to process applications). They *chose* to do nothing about
it and let enormous backlogs develop, whereas in a sane world they
would have regularly been tweaking the requirements or changing the
fees - anything to ensure that the average number of applications
coming in (less an allowance for failed applications) equalled the
number of visas they had available.


    >And my personal example, I was in Sweden in 1989, in a political camp, I
    >could have applied to immigrate to Australia, NZ, South-Africa or US, but I
    >chosen Canada only, so I applied for Canada only, and two months after I
    >received my visa I was already in Toronto. And when did I leave Canada first
    >time? Couple of days after I became Canadian citizen, a drive to
    >Buffalo/Rochester, NY. Is there anything weird in my kind of approach?

Nothing weird at all. But many people with PR status do need to
travel, often in connection with their Canada based jobs.


Jeremy
 

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