Caribbean slang

Old Dec 6th 2019, 2:53 pm
  #31  
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
This is a slight departure from the "Caribbean slang" theme, but... local gestures... Musing to myself in the car the other day, I wondered how long I've been giving a slight jerk of my head upwards as a signal to other drivers joining my line of traffic that I'm giving them the OK to butt in ahead of me. Is it a Caribbean-wide thing? I remember from my travelling days in Turkey - and perhaps in some of the Arab countries - that an upward jerk meant simply "no" in answer to a question. Accompanied by a "tsk" sound as an emphasis. Maybe in Greece too. Quite the opposite of my local car-driving gesture.

Do they use it down your way, Grenada?
I worked in a bar in Cyprus in '92 and the owners were Greek-Cypriots. They both did this gesture..........regularly!
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Old Dec 6th 2019, 4:45 pm
  #32  
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

I have seen similar in The Balkans.
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Old Dec 10th 2019, 11:16 pm
  #33  
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

Another favourite expression of mine in Cayman is "that's what you get" - pronounced "da' wa' ya geh" - meaning "it serves him right". I expect there is something similar around the region - and of course the Caymanian version quite likely came from Jamaica in years past. So, wa' ya got?

I must add that we Europeans virtually never use the expression; any attempt would be laughed at!
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Old Dec 11th 2019, 11:03 am
  #34  
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

There are loads of local sayings really eg - crapaud smoke ya pipe - you had a bad experience. Bunjay oi - expletive - they are both from patois i think, the second is a corruption of bon jesus or deus or something like that.
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Old Dec 17th 2019, 2:06 am
  #35  
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

I remember many years ago my young son coming home from school (here in Cayman) laughing about a Jamaican friend's cheeky comment in a Religious Education class. The teacher told the story of Jesus riding an ass (donkey) into Jerusalem, and to get the kids involved asked the class What would Jesus have done if the disciples hadn't been able to find an ass - or, what if they found one but the owner wouldn't lend it to them? What would you have done, the teacher asked. To which Mark said, to great hilarity, "I tell im bout e fader!" (I'd tell him about his father.) To tell someone about his father - or, worse, his mother - is highly insulting. I think the full version is "tell him that his father's shit stinks", but I'm not sure. A bit like the word "raas" is short for "your arse", which is also insulting. "Get that raas dog out of my yard!" is a common enough usage.

I expect that something of this sort is common in other parts of the Caribbean. Who else has encountered it?
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Old Dec 17th 2019, 11:38 am
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

Tends to be cruder here, maybe its the decline of serious double entendre in calypso, but the more subtle insults have largely been replaced with expletives.

One thing that i still find strange, hello is said good day, which is fine, but goodbye is said as goodday goodday.... or in the afternoon goodnight is hello, and goodnight goodnight is goodbye. Where did that come from...

Remember the lesbian references in the song cheek to cheek dancing or the numerous sparrow sex references. Funny thing, when the track hold you by gyptian came out, no english dj could understand the words, so it was played on the bbc for a month before someone pointed it out, bet this site doesnt block it either...

Like a fast bike pon di road, roo-room, roo-room
Gyal pon de back and she-a boom, boom, boom, boom
Gime mi da maga one or the fat tun tun tun tun
When a player has one time we come to come come
Me outta control
A more fire she want inna her soul
She say more pon more and still she groan
And still me multiply more
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