Caribbean slang

Old Sep 9th 2018, 8:08 pm
  #16  
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Default Re: Caribbean slang

Originally Posted by uk_grenada View Post
Good morning Gordon , apologies if this is spelt slightly unusually but I’m having to use voice to text because I had an Ieye problem - detached retina stuck back on within 24 hours thank you NHS and jet medevac... ! really cant see the keyboard properly temporarily, firstly patwa is properly spelt P a TO I S it’s French word.

Grenadas History is mainly French with some Spanish so much the words are a combination of English and French or English and Spanish although as you know dialect and lack of standard spellings makes a huge difference, this is half the fun of filing the roots of these words

Sorry to hear about your eye problem. Gosh, where did they have to medevac you to? Just as well you have access to a voice-operated computer, eh?

Yes, I know patois is the proper spelling (and I did use it in my post), but in Jamaica (alone, perhaps) the word is usually spelt patwa when it refers to the local version. A patois over time can become a language of its own - witness Afrikaans, for instance, which began as just a colonial-Dutch dialect.

Many years ago I lived in the New Hebrides, a French-British protectorate in the South Pacific, now called Vanuatu, where the lingua franca was simplified pidgin-English speech. When the place became an independent nation, the local rulers decided that the pidgin should be a written language, and some very odd words came into being, spelt phonetically. One of my favourites is olgeta, meaning "everybody" or sometimes "all of them/us"; the origin of which was simply an abbreviated form of "all together". Google the word, for a smile. Gutpela is from "good fellow", and so on.
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