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Another worried ACS applicant...

Another worried ACS applicant...

Old Jun 6th 2002, 3:13 pm
  #1  
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Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 14
chrisbridge is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Another worried ACS applicant...

Hi all
I’m writing in the hope of getting some advice/opinions on my chances of passing the RPL assessment.

I have a little over 2 years commercial experience at a blue chip set up working on small (mainly) dot.com type projects in the following areas:
- Web site development (HTML, Javascript, CSS, Servlets/JSPs)
- E-commerce (HTTP Server, Websphere App Server, Websphere Commerce Suite, DB2)
- Interactive TV (Transcoding Publisher, XML, XSL)
- Enterprise application development (J2EE + EJBs)
Whilst a lot of these skills feature on the MODL list – which is great - my concern is that my experience falls too far short of the recommended 4 year minimum for employer references and won’t get me through the RPL assessment. Additionally I can only probably lay claim to 5 or 6 of the CBOK areas of knowledge (if I’m being generous to myself here and there).

One alternative to this is to make my visa application as a physicist (for my sins I did a PhD in semiconductor physics) rather than as an IT professional. The skills assessment for physicists comprises of little more than verifying my qualifications. Dead easy, but what worries me a little here is that, based on the SOL point scores, physics is not in as much demand as IT. I should point out though that I’m planning to go for a ‘designated area sponsored’ visa so I would actually be exempt from the points test…

What I’d like to ask is:

Despite my relative inexperience would it be worthwhile me putting in an application for RPL?

The lower points rating for physicists compared to IT bods must reflect the relative importance of the 2 occupations in the eyes of the 'decision makers'. If so, could applying for a visa as a physics nerd significantly reduce my chances of success even though I don’t need to pass the point test?

Is it likely that I might get picked up on applying for a visa as a physicist after spending the last couple of years in IT?

If required and if I have any money left, can I make a second visa application?

Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

Chris
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Old Jun 6th 2002, 5:35 pm
  #2  
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Joined: May 2002
Location: Brazil
Posts: 251
Lana is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Another worried ACS applicant...

I think that the odds of passing the RPL just on 2 years experience are not very good. Also, would you be needing the Skilled Work Experience points? Because if you'd need them to get 115, then there's no point in doing the RPL. If you pass the RPL on the 2 years experience, it will leave you with no experience after the deeming date and unable to claim the SWE points.

I don't know about the physics visa, but again, if you don't need the SWE points, you can apply for a visa as a physicist even though you work in IT. I think it is a matter of calculating what gives you enough points. If only the ACS RPL does, then apply for it. In the worst case, you spent AUS$400.
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Old Jun 6th 2002, 10:20 pm
  #3  
Jaj
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Default Re: Another worried ACS applicant...

Chris Many people have a nominated occupation that's different to their work
experience. As long as your work experience is skilled then you meet the
requirements. And if you can get past the points test with a 50 point occupation (or
don't need it if skilled designated area) then you should be ok.

Provided DIMIA accept your work experience in IT as 'skilled' even though your degree
is in physics. George Lombard may be able to shed more light on this, but I do think
others have been down this route before.

Jeremy

    >On 6 Jun 2002 17:21:03 GMT, chrisbridge <[email protected]> wrote: What I’d
    >like to ask is:
    >
    >Despite my relative inexperience would it be worthwhile me putting in an
    >application for RPL?
    >
    >The lower points rating for physicists compared to IT bods must reflect the relative
    >importance of the 2 occupations in the eyes of the 'decision makers'. If so, could
    >applying for a visa as a physics nerd significantly reduce my chances of success
    >even though I don’t need to pass the point test?
    >
    >Is it likely that I might get picked up on applying for a visa as a physicist after
    >spending the last couple of years in IT?
    >
    >If required and if I have any money left, can I make a second visa application?
    >
    >Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
    >
    >Chris
    >
    >
    >
    >--
    >Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Jun 7th 2002, 9:20 pm
  #4  
George Lombard
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Another worried ACS applicant...

Hi Chris,

First, despite anything you read on this ng, bear in mind that ACS requires four
years work experience for RPL. It might shade that requirement in particular cases
but would certainly not go down to two.

Second, a lot of research students in physical sciences have quite advanced
programming skills through their studies and working in particular applications; in
some cases it is possible to take into account PhD experience as work experience, and
it might be worthwhile, if you had no other option, to see whether ACS would accept
you as having a major in IT.

Third, Jeremy is right that in theory you could go for the 50 point skill assessment
and then claim your recent work in IT as your recent work experience. However in
practice I am not sure that Adelaide will automatically accept that work you are
doing in a 60 point occupation, without relevant qualifications, is acceptable. Given
the relative advantage of a designated area sponsored application in your case (no
other choice) I think you should go ahead with Vetassess but when you lodge the visa
application make sure that your references massively support the claim that you are
working as a computing professional rather than as a trainee, network nerd, etc.

Cheers

George Lombard

www.austimmigration.com.au chrisbridge wrote in message
<[email protected]>...
    >Hi all I’m writing in the hope of getting some advice/opinions on my chances of
    >passing the RPL assessment.
    >
    >I have a little over 2 years commercial experience at a blue chip set up working on
    >small (mainly) dot.com type projects in the following areas:
    >- Web site development (HTML, Javascript, CSS, Servlets/JSPs)
    >- E-commerce (HTTP Server, Websphere App Server, Websphere Commerce Suite, DB2)
    >- Interactive TV (Transcoding Publisher, XML, XSL)
    >- Enterprise application development (J2EE + EJBs) Whilst a lot of these skills
    > feature on the MODL list – which is great - my concern is that my experience falls
    > too far short of the recommended 4 year minimum for employer references and won’t
    > get me through the RPL assessment. Additionally I can only probably lay claim to 5
    > or 6 of the CBOK areas of knowledge (if I’m being generous to myself here and
    > there).
    >
    >One alternative to this is to make my visa application as a physicist (for my sins I
    >did a PhD in semiconductor physics) rather than as an IT professional. The skills
    >assessment for physicists comprises of little more than verifying my qualifications.
    >Dead easy, but what worries me a little here is that, based on the SOL point scores,
    >physics is not in as much demand as IT. I should point out though that I’m planning
    >to go for a ‘designated area sponsored’ visa so I would actually be exempt from the
    >points test…
    >
    >What I’d like to ask is:
    >
    >Despite my relative inexperience would it be worthwhile me putting in an
    >application for RPL?
    >
    >The lower points rating for physicists compared to IT bods must reflect the relative
    >importance of the 2 occupations in the eyes of the 'decision makers'. If so, could
    >applying for a visa as a physics nerd significantly reduce my chances of success
    >even though I don’t need to pass the point test?
    >
    >Is it likely that I might get picked up on applying for a visa as a physicist after
    >spending the last couple of years in IT?
    >
    >If required and if I have any money left, can I make a second visa application?
    >
    >Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
    >
    >Chris
    >
    >
    >
    >--
    >Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Jun 9th 2002, 1:20 pm
  #5  
Jaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Another worried ACS applicant...

George I think normally it's good to keep the nominated occupation as close as
possible to one's work experience, but if that's not feasible then an alternative
course should be explored.

    >Third, Jeremy is right that in theory you could go for the 50 point skill assessment
    >and then claim your recent work in IT as your recent work experience. However in
    >practice I am not sure that Adelaide will automatically accept that work you are
    >doing in a 60 point occupation, without relevant qualifications, is acceptable.
    >Given the relative advantage of a designated area sponsored application in your case
    >(no other choice) I think you should go ahead with Vetassess but when you lodge the
    >visa application make sure that your references massively support the claim that you
    >are working as a computing professional rather than as a trainee, network nerd, etc.

Plus it surely couldn't hurt to include academic references (as well as his VETASSESS
assessment) to the effect that his degree had some IT content.

You could have mentioned that this is the sort of case where a good agent can add
some value.

Regards

Jeremy
 

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