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Prepare for your New Life

Prepare for your New Life

Emigrating can be a long process, with many months of waiting for envelopes to drop through the mail box. Rather than focus on “˜being in limbo’ think about what is good about having this time before you move and research, research, research. The more knowledge you have about where you are moving to, the more prepared you will be. Time is one thing in life we only have a limited amount of, make the most of yours and take action towards your dream life!

Emigrating can be a long process, with many months of waiting for envelopes to drop through the mail box. Rather than focus on “˜being in limbo’ think about what is good about having this time before you move. Time is one thing in life we only have a limited amount of, make the most of yours and take action towards your dream life!

1. Be Clear in What you Want

Create a list of what you want from your new life. Write your “˜wants’ in positive statements. Not what you are getting away from but want you will be gaining in your new country. If you know what you are getting away from, i.e. what you don’t want, then you must know what you do want. E.g. If you want to get away from the rat race, the positive of that would be you want a more relaxed life style. You get the idea? It is far easier to create this list now, whilst you have time to really think about it, in familiar surroundings. It will be a good point of reference to remind yourself of what you are gaining when you are in the middle of upheaval, after you arrive. Use it as a motivational tool to keep you working towards your new life. We get what we focus on; make sure you focus on the right things.

2. Plan at least one Fact Finding Trip

I know what you’re thinking:

  • We’ve been there we know what its like.
  • We can’t afford the cost.
  • We want to save all our money for when we move.
  • We can’t take time off work.

It could save you time and money in the long run. When you visit with the specific intention of moving there to live you will see things differently. You wouldn’t buy a house without seeing inside, or a car without a test drive. This is a life time commitment, experience and “˜feel’ what a place is like. Go twice if you can, the second time you will notice different aspects. Make it as real as you can, stay self catering, visit the supermarkets, look at neighborhoods, speak to locals, bed and breakfast can also offer an insight into living somewhere, and give you chance to speak to residents. Meet up with other expats already there. Plan your trip before you go, think about what you want to know by the time you return home and set some actions to achieve your goals. Plan a few days enjoyment; after you have achieved what you came for, this is not a holiday but an investigative trip to find out what you need to know before moving there. Read local newspapers, even if you don’t normally read them it gives you good indications of what communities are like.

3. Create a support network

Make new contacts and friends during your fact finding trip, and research, they will be a great resource now, during and after you move. It is easier to ask someone how to do something, than spend ages trying to work it out on your own. Challenges you face can seem less of a problem when shared with someone who has faced similar challenges and understands what you are feeling. Expatriates have years of experience they are often happy to share with newcomers. Your current family, friends and colleagues, however supportive and understanding will be dealing with their own emotions about you leaving. They may not be able to provide the support you need especially when they are far away.

4. Research, Research, Research

{mosbanner right}The more knowledge you have about where you are moving to, the more prepared you will be. Take this time as the ideal opportunity to research as much as you can about where you are going. Think how much you take for granted about where you live now, you have had many years to learn everything you know. Every day tasks may be different; if you are prepared it will save you worry and frustrations. Check out information, advice from others is useful but it is from their experience your situation may be different. Identify what you would like to find out about, and think about how you could get that information. Write an action plan to get the information you want, tick each item off as you complete that part of the research, you will see the progress as you become more knowledgeable about how things work in your new country.

5. Prepare for Work

Unless you are very lucky, you will need a job to finance your new life, and work will play a big part in that. How quickly you get a job may affect how quickly you settle in to your new home. There will be many differences in what is accepted, make sure your CV is re-written with words and phrases used by potential new employers. Learn about how employers expect you to pursue jobs, what they expect from you. Make sure you know common working terms and conditions, holidays, rates of pay, benefits commonly offered. Make sure there are no surprises when you come to applying for and getting that job. To get a job offer before moving is fantastic, but in most cases employers will not take you seriously until you are in the country, but that does not stop you from getting prepared to hit the ground running.

Preparation Check List
  • Have you defined your goals for emigrating?
  • Planned your fact finding trip?
  • Have you a list of contacts and support friends?
  • Have you researched everything you need to know, for your new life?
  • What information do you not have about work?
  • Where do you need to spend more time?
  • How much more do you want to know?
  • What actions do you need to take now?

This article was written by Louise Green, I am a qualified coach, running a migration, relocation and expatriate coaching business. I help clients to take their dreams of a better life and turn them into reality. If you would like to discuss this article or any other aspect of migration coaching with Louise, please contact me: [email protected] :: www.theexpatcoach.com

©Louise Green