Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
Scroll to top

Top

Five Things You Should Do To Prepare For Working Abroad

Five Things You Should Do To Prepare For Working Abroad

According to the Institute for Public Policy Research, approximately 5.5 million British expats currently live abroad and a further 2,000 continue to move away from the UK each week. Many people move abroad in search of work, but there are some key things you should do before you make the move.

According to the Institute for Public Policy Research, approximately 5.5 million British expats currently live abroad and a further 2,000 continue to move away from the UK each week. Many people move abroad in search of work, but there are some key things you should do before you make the move:

REDEVELOP YOUR CV

Redevelop your CV in the format of the country in which you intend to work. This is vitally important since CV styles can vary from country to country. Some countries may require more or less personal information be included in your CV eg. religious affiliation and family circumstances. If in doubt, consult a local career development professional for guidance. Local job search websites can also provide an insight into CV formats and general labour market information

ESTABLISH NETWORKS

Establish networks and contacts in the country in which you plan to work. Networking is a powerful job search tool, but even if you already have a job arranged, developing a solid network of friends and colleagues before you relocate will be invaluable in helping you get settled in your new location.There are numerous networks you can tap into online. Try networking via online forums (expat forums are great for connecting with other expats who live or have lived in the area you are going to), LinkedIn, Meetup, Yahoo Groups and Facebook

RESEARCH THE LOCATION

Thoroughly research the location you intend to live in. Find out as much as you can about the area in which you intend to settle including housing, transport, schools, political and economic situation; anything that will provide insight into the local community. If you are planning to work and live abroad with family, be sure to research neighbourhoods, schools, childcare, extra-curricular activities, medical services and any other services your family regularly uses

GET TO KNOW THE EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS

Ensure you understand employment conditions in the country and workplace you intend to work. Employment conditions can vary significantly from what you are used to, it's best to be aware of these before you start work. Some of the conditions that can vary according to the country and specific workplace are; the hours of work, leave entitlements, work tasks, dress code and office culture. General information about employment conditions in respective countries can be found at the country's own department of labour. Your networks are another good resource to help educate you in respect to local employment conditions

ALLOW A SETTLING IN PERIOD

Allow a period of time to get settled before commencing work if possible. Two to four weeks is ideal but if this is not possible, arrange at least a week to acclimatise and get your bearings. It's difficult to approach a new job with the necessary vigour if you are still overcoming jetlag, trying to find somewhere to live or generally feeling unsure of your surroundings

Lisa LaRue, MCareerDev, BSocSc (Couns), DipCareerGuid, CDAA is a Career Counsellor & Coach at CareerWorx Careers & Transitions specialising in helping people prepare to work abroad. Having lived in Australia, UK and Northern Europe, she has developed in-depth knowledge of labour markets and conditions in these regions. Learn more at www.careerworx.com.au and www.careerworx.co.uk

Share