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Where do I fit in the US Education system

Where do I fit in the US Education system

Old Jun 29th 2013, 4:30 am
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Default Where do I fit in the US Education system

I currently am trying to find out where in the us education system I would slot in if I wanted to move (Florida area) I have father who has lived in the USA for 8 years and is currently in the naturalization process and I am coming out of my first year of as levels, knowing I haven't been successful this year (family issues etc) I have chosen to make the leap and cross the pond, my main dilemma is that I wish to find out where in the system I fit, having a decent set of gcse results (2 a*, 3 A's and 2 b's and a c) I would like to continue my education to get to a level ready for application to university/college, staying at home in the uk isn't an option for me anymore and would like to know where I would slot it, from what I've read it seemed like I would join in 11th grade (I'm currently 17) and continue to age 19 with a high school diploma and some AP courses, am i right in this observation? If not correct away and if its any, help I'd be living in the Florida/hillsborough area, thank you for your time this is a great help
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 4:42 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

You won't really "fit" into the US system very well.

At 17 I would forget about high school and think about taking classes at a community college with a view to accumulating sufficient credits to allow you to transfer to a university after a year or two.

Be aware that education in the US is expensive and, as a new arrival, you would be charged out of state tuition rates for the first year at least.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 5:01 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

I am aware of the costs, so what I read/believed about joining a high school is wrong? , also would taking classes at a community college limit me in terms of quality of university ect? Thanks again
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 5:44 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by YeomaJosh View Post
I am aware of the costs, so what I read/believed about joining a high school is wrong?
I don't know anything about the UK levels, but I can tell you that a typical 17 year old in the USA would be either a Junior or Senior in high school (I was 17 when I was a Senior and graduated high school in May. I turned 18 during the winter semester as a Freshman at University).

also would taking classes at a community college limit me in terms of quality of university ect?
No. If anything, it will be a cheaper way of getting the basic coursework out of the way for the first 2 years. Then you can concetrate on your major area when you transfer to a university.

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Old Jun 29th 2013, 5:51 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by Noorah101 View Post
I don't know anything about the UK levels, but I can tell you that a typical 17 year old in the USA would be either a Junior or Senior in high school (I was 17 when I was a Senior and graduated high school in May. I turned 18 during the winter semester as a Freshman at University).

Rene
Thanks for the reply, with information on the Internet being scarce and unclear I was wondering if it was possibly to join as a junior in high school? That would leave me as finishing at 19, I'm not sure how integral the previous 2 years are? Would I be able to apply to the respective ap classes and such as I have always wished to do a 4 year course at university and I would be gutted to do a 2+2 course if I was honest
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 6:09 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by YeomaJosh View Post
I have always wished to do a 4 year course at university and I would be gutted to do a 2+2 course if I was honest
Why? detail your reasons.

The degree at the end is what is looked at, it is a common approach to do 2 cheap years at community college, and 2 later years at university. It gets you the same with a big saving. I see no reason not to do it that way.

The second year of A'levels is equivalent to the first year of a US degree, so it might be possible for you to go straight to college. Though it might be messy getting one year of A levels evaluated. I would consider contacting colleges directly.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 6:16 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

I liked the idea of settling down for 4 years at one institute, another being some of the negativity where I come from relating to colleges being considered of a lesser quality than traditional 6th forms (this probably doesn't translate over) I'm expecting an A, a b/c and a u/d in product design, physics and maths (in the order shown), with the expected/shown grades, looking I would like to go to the university of Florida, (unsure if I have good enough grades) or the university of central Florida.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 7:35 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Kids who are 16 -> 17 are Juniors (they turn 17 during their Junior year)
Kids are 17 - > 18 are Seniors (they turn 18 during their Senior year)

Generally...

You have probably enough coursework already to enter what is know as a "community college" here in the USA, which will either give you a 2-year degree in a trade, called an 'associates degree' or a place where you can get your 'required coursework' for a 4-year university degree out of the way (2 at the community college, 2 at the university). Community colleges are somewhat cheaper than a traditional 4-year university, but the classes you take there will be credited to your 4-year degree at most universities.

A community college might be a cheaper option and also a chance to prove yourself academically so that you can get into a better school for your last two years. You will also have a chance to socially integrate with your classmates in a more relaxed environment than a full university setting.

(as a general note, in the US the term 'college' and 'university' are used more or less interchangeably)
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 7:55 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

[QUOTE=penguinsix;10777690]Kids who are 16 -> 17 are Juniors (they turn 17 during their Junior year)
Kids are 17 - > 18 are Seniors (they turn 18 during their Senior year)

I realized this, but if I chose to try and obtain a place at a high school due to the circumstances (different education systems) would it just be at the discrepancy of the school? I apologize if I appear stubborn I would just prefer to keep the two separate with high school/pre degree work done, and then have a full 4 year course, thank you for the reply
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 8:05 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by penguinsix View Post
A community college might be a cheaper option and also a chance to prove yourself academically so that you can get into a better school for your last two years. You will also have a chance to socially integrate with your classmates in a more relaxed environment than a full university setting.
I agree. More specifically I think that it would almost certainly not be a great idea for a 17 year old arriving in the US to attempt to complete one final year of US high school - I suspect that both socially and academically it has the potential to be a waste of time at best and, quite possibly, a disaster.

I wonder if the OP has considered timing their proposed move to the US so that they effectively have a "gap year" between school and college / university in which to settle in to their new environment.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 8:12 am
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by md95065 View Post
I agree. More specifically I think that it would almost certainly not be a great idea for a 17 year old arriving in the US to attempt to complete one final year of US high school - I suspect that both socially and academically it has the potential to be a waste of time at best and, quite possibly, a disaster.

I wonder if the OP has considered timing their proposed move to the US so that they effectively have a "gap year" between school and college / university in which to settle in to their new environment.
I'm fairly comfortable with my surrounding normally spending a month or so a year here, I wouldn't be looking to do a final year, I would be applying to join as a junior as I believe legally you can attend till 21, I suppose it would ultimately be up to the respective high schools, additionally I don't think I'd respond well to a gap year.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 1:14 pm
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

So you have your Visa and are good to go for the next school year?
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 1:39 pm
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

[QUOTE=YeomaJosh;10777703]
Originally Posted by penguinsix View Post
Kids who are 16 -> 17 are Juniors (they turn 17 during their Junior year)
Kids are 17 - > 18 are Seniors (they turn 18 during their Senior year)

I realized this, but if I chose to try and obtain a place at a high school due to the circumstances (different education systems) would it just be at the discrepancy of the school? I apologize if I appear stubborn I would just prefer to keep the two separate with high school/pre degree work done, and then have a full 4 year course, thank you for the reply
I also think you'll just be "repeating" what you've already taken. If you want to go just to experience American high school then as long as you're aware, so be it.

When do you turn 18? I don't think a high school will slot you into a grade level based on age. I think they'll look at your overall academics and see what you need to catch up on credits (something you need in high schools over here to graduate) and then place you that way. I very well could be wrong, so until you are here and have been to your local high school, everything is a speculation.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 1:41 pm
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Default Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by YeomaJosh View Post
I'm fairly comfortable with my surrounding normally spending a month or so a year here, I wouldn't be looking to do a final year, I would be applying to join as a junior as I believe legally you can attend till 21, I suppose it would ultimately be up to the respective high schools, additionally I don't think I'd respond well to a gap year.
You can legally attend if you have special needs, do you qualify in that category? They don't typically have academically sound students still going to school at 20 years old.
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Old Jun 29th 2013, 2:54 pm
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Post Re: Where do I fit in the US Education system

Originally Posted by penguinsix View Post
Kids who are 16 -> 17 are Juniors (they turn 17 during their Junior year)
Kids are 17 - > 18 are Seniors (they turn 18 during their Senior year)

Generally...

You have probably enough coursework already to enter what is know as a "community college" here in the USA, which will either give you a 2-year degree in a trade, called an 'associates degree' or a place where you can get your 'required coursework' for a 4-year university degree out of the way (2 at the community college, 2 at the university). Community colleges are somewhat cheaper than a traditional 4-year university, but the classes you take there will be credited to your 4-year degree at most universities.

A community college might be a cheaper option and also a chance to prove yourself academically so that you can get into a better school for your last two years. You will also have a chance to socially integrate with your classmates in a more relaxed environment than a full university setting.

(as a general note, in the US the term 'college' and 'university' are used more or less interchangeably)
Absolutely agree with you that it would be more beneficial to go to Community College for 2 years then transfer to a university.

My son did this even though he'd been in the US since shortly before his 12th birthday (we were going through the AOS for our green cards at the time he was applying for uni and his L2 visa had expired in his passport but did not physically have a Green Card. It was a nightmare to get a uni to take him as the admissions office staff could not be convinced that he was legally resident in the US....a Community College in the next county accepted him, he passed an Associate Degree then transferred to university). Ironically shortly afterwards his GC arrived in the mail...

TBH many of my son's friends from high school who went to 4 year colleges/unis transferred out after their first year; most of them couldn't settle or were dissatisfied with their choices. If you look at those huge college guides (eg. Peterson's) they list the % of students who have transferred out (perhaps some 'dropped out' altogether but that isn't listed seperately AFAIK) It is surprising at how few actually seem to complete their 4 year degree at the same institution.

I guess that the brightest undergraduate students who get into Princeton, Yale, Harvard etc. stay for the 4 years, but the university system in the States is so different to the UK (where British students typically stick with the same course/uni for the duration of their degree).

I would also suggest that the O/P think hard about going to an American high school after being in a UK Sixth form. Although many of the high schoolers will be driving to school and have their own cars, from my own observation of my son's peers the boys in particular seemed to be a bit less streetwise than my son's cousins in the UK of the same age (and also whom had been in pubs or clubs in the UK or on their holidays in Europe). Btw - In my town in NJ and other local towns, adults can and have been arrested if they allow under 21s to have an alcoholic drink in their own home..
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