Uuugghh!

Old Aug 5th 2002, 5:19 am
  #1  
LeightonJ
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Default Uuugghh!

Why is it that there are so many worthless citizens in this country who sit on there porches all day and all night, watching, as hard working people like myself drive by, going to and from work.....yet my husband WANTS to work so bad, but cant? HE isn't to blame for being here illegaly. His mom is at fault for messing up his future as bad as she did. He is intelligent, ambitious, and eager, and most important, he has never considered himself any different than the next American until he found out after growing up here for the last 16 years! Now 19, and married, we are stuck. And, worst of all, our country had to go through a horrible tragedy on September 11th, where thousands died.........and the dominoe effect started, and is making such things as immigration for innocent and eager people like my husband from building his future...anyone have any suggestions other than the 245-I that I can bring up at our next lawyer appointment?
-Emily
 
Old Aug 5th 2002, 1:25 pm
  #2  
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

The acts of September 11 had nothing to do with your husband's situation. As his/your previous posts started he arrived in the US was illegal as his mother paid someone while in Canada to smuggle him into the US at the age of two. She then supposedly got a phony visa of some sort and came here later.

Section 245(i) was in affect and expired long before September 11th and its extension has been in debate in Congress since its expiration. Before September 11th there were many people who were against the reactivation of the bill as they feel that rewarding illegals for illegal activity is wrong.

Speaking only for myself and no one else on the board, your husband and his mother and all the other illegals piss me off when they circumvent the INS rules and regulations for their benefit. We, US Citizens and foreign fiancees and spouses, have followed those rules, jumped through hoops, had our petitions delayed because of the influx of petitions due to Section 245(i) when it was in affect and are not given preferential treatment even though we are US Citizens. It burns me to see illegals be able to get status ahead of or at the same time as a family member of a USC who is doing things legally. Why play by the rules if the government is only going to reward you down the line for ignoring them.

The above statement has nothing to do with the hardship of the illegals, their escape from less than human living conditions in their own country, or their contribution to ours. It is a statement regarding the government's need to ensure their political future by buying the votes of illegals because they can't count on the votes of US citizens and their total disregard for the constituents who have placed them in office by treating them like the illegals while the illegals are treated like citizens.

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Old Aug 5th 2002, 6:20 pm
  #3  
Mrtravel
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

What? Her husband, the illegal, pisses you off? Like it is his fault he is here? He
is what, 19? And he has been here for the past 16 years.

How is this much different than the sympathy others have shown for the Indian college
student that is being deported? Although he originally came into the US legally, the
Indian's stay for the past 7 years has been illegal. So, the fact that the Jamaican
came in illegally as a toddler is something he should be blamed for? But, no, we have
people considering special legislation in one case, but not for the Jamaican. Why?
 
Old Aug 5th 2002, 7:14 pm
  #4  
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

Originally posted by Mrtravel
What? Her husband, the illegal, pisses you off? Like it is his fault he is here? He
is what, 19? And he has been here for the past 16 years.

How is this much different than the sympathy others have shown for the Indian college
student that is being deported? Although he originally came into the US legally, the
Indian's stay for the past 7 years has been illegal. So, the fact that the Jamaican
came in illegally as a toddler is something he should be blamed for? But, no, we have
people considering special legislation in one case, but not for the Jamaican. Why?
I did not response to the Indian's tale of woe. This pisses me off because regardless of his reasons for being here, he has the opportunity to adjust status if Section 245(i) is passed.

Besides it is not the man that pisses me off but the opportunity Section 245(i) gives illegals. To me, that is not the same and no where did I profess to say he, as an individual, was the cause of my annoyance.

As you and others can readily see, I am not in favor of the passing of Section 245(i) for an extended term and have written my politicans accordingly.

JFYI, the English immigrant who is the surviving wife of a deceased worker from the WTC, was granted permanent residency and they have further expedited her case so that she is eligible to apply for naturalization immediately.

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Old Aug 5th 2002, 10:20 pm
  #5  
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

Rete wrote:
    >
    > JFYI, the English immigrant who is the surviving wife of a deceased worker from the
    > WTC, was granted permanent residency and they have further expedited her case so
    > that she is eligible to apply for naturalization immediately.

See the unfairness? She is going to make a fast leap from H1B dependent to Citizen
with only a short time as PR. Meanwhile, other spouses of citizens or PRs don't even
get the same treatment. I am not saying that she didn't suffer a loss, but if this is
going to be policy, then it should be clearly put into writing... Like a law, or
something So what if the Jamaican guy was here illegally at age 2? He is an adult,
he knows no other country. He didn't do anything wrong. If he is a law abiding, hard
working person, why can't he stay? or the Indian?
 
Old Aug 5th 2002, 10:44 pm
  #6  
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

IMO, the WTC widow and the Indian, for that matter as well, were both here in the US initially with permission of the INS and if their spouses had not died would have eventually been recipients of green cards. Illegal aliens who are allowed to use Section 245(i) it re-enacted are uninspected aliens who entered the US illegally.

FWIW, it should be on the books that a surviving spouse of a green card holder who has yet to receive their green card but who has made the US their home, should be allowed the opportunity to adjust status.
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Old Aug 6th 2002, 3:20 pm
  #7  
L D Jones
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

Rete wrote:
    >
    > IMO, the WTC widow and the Indian, for that matter as well, were both here in the
    > US initially with permission of the INS and if their spouses had not died would
    > have eventually been recipients of green cards.

Not necessarily. Many H-1Bs and their dependents leave the US when their work
assignment is over.
 
Old Aug 6th 2002, 4:04 pm
  #8  
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

Originally posted by L D Jones
:
   Â
Not necessarily. Many H-1Bs and their dependents leave the US when their work
assignment is over.
Excuse me I was not speaking in generalities here.

It was necessary for me to point out that in both instances the spouse that died was in the process of obtaining a green card and/or applying for naturalization.

Yes it is obvious that many H-1B visa holders do not become green card holders. Not just because they don't want to be but because their companies refuse to sponsor them for the green card.

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Old Sep 4th 2002, 11:54 pm
  #9  
James Donovan
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

mrtravel <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
    > Rete wrote:
    > >
    > > JFYI, the English immigrant who is the surviving wife of a deceased worker from
    > > the WTC, was granted permanent residency and they have further expedited her case
    > > so that she is eligible to apply for naturalization immediately.
    > See the unfairness? She is going to make a fast leap from H1B dependent to Citizen
    > with only a short time as PR. Meanwhile, other spouses of citizens or PRs don't
    > even get the same treatment. I am not saying that she didn't suffer a loss, but if
    > this is going to be policy, then it should be clearly put into writing... Like a
    > law, or something So what if the Jamaican guy was here illegally at age 2? He is
    > an adult, he knows no other country. He didn't do anything wrong. If he is a law
    > abiding, hard working person, why can't he stay? or the Indian?

Because there is nothing wrong with going back to Jamaica. Immigrants who immigrate
here adjust quite well, so why can't he do the same back in Jamaica? He will have an
easier life and be able to work legally without any trouble.
 
Old Sep 5th 2002, 12:51 am
  #10  
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

There have been updates on the case of the Indian student and his family facing deportation.

http://www.goupstate.com/docs/News/gen/12962.asp
http://www.goupstate.com/docs/News/gen/12960.asp

If motivated/convincing/etc. enough a person can reach for the stars and sometimes touch them.

This is one of those times that the saying "It will take an act of Congress to change things" is apropos.

But it can be done, just ask all of the new drivers in the state of SC!

Best wishes,
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Old Sep 5th 2002, 2:25 am
  #11  
LeightonJ
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

Originally posted by James Donovan:
mrtravel <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
    > Rete wrote:
    > >
    > > JFYI, the English immigrant who is the surviving wife of a deceased worker from
    > > the WTC, was granted permanent residency and they have further expedited her case
    > > so that she is eligible to apply for naturalization immediately.
    > See the unfairness? She is going to make a fast leap from H1B dependent to Citizen
    > with only a short time as PR. Meanwhile, other spouses of citizens or PRs don't
    > even get the same treatment. I am not saying that she didn't suffer a loss, but if
    > this is going to be policy, then it should be clearly put into writing... Like a
    > law, or something So what if the Jamaican guy was here illegally at age 2? He is
    > an adult, he knows no other country. He didn't do anything wrong. If he is a law
    > abiding, hard working person, why can't he stay? or the Indian?

Because there is nothing wrong with going back to Jamaica. Immigrants who immigrate
here adjust quite well, so why can't he do the same back in Jamaica? He will have an
easier life and be able to work legally without any trouble.

There IS most certainly something wrong with going back to Jamaica when you have only known America. You have to realiize....not everywhere in Jamaica is like the resorts you see on Tv. In fact, where most of Jerome's "family" resides, it is basically like a killing ground. There is a lot of violence and my husband wouldnt know how to survive there. Imagine for a moment that YOU were born in Jamaica......different food, thick accents, different climate....and then you moved to the US when you were 2, and were used to "american" food, and cold winters, and diverse culture....it just isnt fair if he would have to be sent back...
-Emily
 
Old Sep 5th 2002, 6:01 am
  #12  
Mrtravel
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

LeightonJ wrote:

    > There IS most certainly something wrong with going back to Jamaica when you have
    > only known America. You have to realiize....not everywhere in Jamaica is like the
    > resorts you see on Tv.

Really??? Are you really that much of an idiot to think that people in THIS newsgroup
don't have a clue about life in other country's?

In fact, where most of
    > Jerome's "family" resides, it is basically like a killing ground. There is a lot of
    > violence and my husband wouldnt know how to survive there.

Where exactly is this killing ground??? Can you be more specific? How many of these
"family" members are being murdered?

I have spent a great deal of time in Jamaica and do not know of this "killing" ground
as you describe it. Going back now is going to be a problem because he has passed
the 10 year ban mark for return to the US. Had he done it before turning 18 1/2,
there would have been no bad and based on a fiance or spouse visa, he could have been
here in months.

    > Imagine for a moment that YOU were born in Jamaica......different food, thick
    > accents, different climate....and then you moved to the US when you were 2, and
    > were used to "american" food, and cold winters, and diverse culture....it just isnt
    > fair if he would have to be sent back..

Oh, please.. Different climate?? Is he that sickly that a little summer will kill
him? Will he perish without "cold winters"? What do you think the food will do to
him? Have you ever been to a standard shopping are in Jamaica? I assure you there
is more food I like in Jamaica than I dislike. And I am not just talking about the
creme puffs at the Sandals restaurants. Do you think Jamaicans are so different?

I think the fact that he has family there would be a good thing.

Is his mother still in the US? Did you "love" each other before he turned 18 1/2?
 
Old Sep 5th 2002, 9:13 pm
  #13  
LeightonJ
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Default Re: Uuugghh!

Originally posted by Mrtravel:
LeightonJ wrote:

    > There IS most certainly something wrong with going back to Jamaica when you have
    > only known America. You have to realiize....not everywhere in Jamaica is like the
    > resorts you see on Tv.

Really??? Are you really that much of an idiot to think that people in THIS newsgroup
don't have a clue about life in other country's?




In fact, where most of
    > Jerome's "family" resides, it is basically like a killing ground. There is a lot of
    > violence and my husband wouldnt know how to survive there.

Where exactly is this killing ground??? Can you be more specific? How many of these
"family" members are being murdered?

I have spent a great deal of time in Jamaica and do not know of this "killing" ground
as you describe it. Going back now is going to be a problem because he has passed
the 10 year ban mark for return to the US. Had he done it before turning 18 1/2,
there would have been no bad and based on a fiance or spouse visa, he could have been
here in months.

    > Imagine for a moment that YOU were born in Jamaica......different food, thick
    > accents, different climate....and then you moved to the US when you were 2, and
    > were used to "american" food, and cold winters, and diverse culture....it just isnt
    > fair if he would have to be sent back..

Oh, please.. Different climate?? Is he that sickly that a little summer will kill
him? Will he perish without "cold winters"? What do you think the food will do to
him? Have you ever been to a standard shopping are in Jamaica? I assure you there
is more food I like in Jamaica than I dislike. And I am not just talking about the
creme puffs at the Sandals restaurants. Do you think Jamaicans are so different?

I think the fact that he has family there would be a good thing.

Is his mother still in the US? Did you "love" each other before he turned 18 1/2?
First of all, I never called anyone an idiot, nor did I second-guess anyones intelligence in this newsgroup. ANYONE could probably get accustomed to any country.....but thats just it....NO ONE should get accustomed if they have known one country their whole life, (Or large majority of their life.) Jerome DOESNT want to go back, and, his 2 cousins were just shot down last month, I do not need to discuss what part of Jamaica because of privacy concerns, but I assure you....they are dead. That is about all the family he was "close to" (A once a month phone convo perhaps.) Also....how naive can you be to say that it would be a good thing for him to leave me to be around his family? FAMILY literally, not figuratively. He has never met 7/8ths of them, nor talked to them or even seen pictures....And, YES we loved eachother before he was 181/2....had I come across an intelligent group of people as are on this newsgroup a few months ago, maybe our actions would have been different, and we would have known about the ban...but you cant change the past. Also, if I were Chinese, I could eat rats like they do in China...but why would I want to go eat Rats if I was accustomed to hot dogs and hamburgers while being raised in America? Im not putting down Jamaicans, or their culture, but if you arent used to something, and you don't WANT to get accustomed to it....then that it your perogotive. Yes, his mother is still here, and recieving benefits from the government. I can't stand her and she has messed her sons life up beyond belief. I don't know how she has managed to stay here illegally and live off the system, but, trust me, she has. SHE is the type that I have little or no sympathy for. She should have filed the necessary paperwork for herself and her son 17 years ago..no excuse whatsoever, and no that Im married to him, I have to work my butt off along with Jerome to fix her mistake..... I cant help who I love....
 
Old Sep 6th 2002, 1:25 am
  #14  
Mrtravel
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LeightonJ wrote:
    > First of all, I never called anyone an idiot, nor did I second-guess anyones
    > intelligence in this newsgroup.

No, you indicated we didn't have a clue about had life was in other countries.

    > ANYONE could probably get accustomed to any country.....but thats just it....NO
    > ONE should get accustomed if they have known one country their whole life, (Or
    > large majority of their life.)

He didn't have to get accustomed to it. It was just for the I-130 or I-129F filing.
It's not like he was going to be stuck there for life.

Jerome DOESNT want to go back, and, his 2
    > cousins were just shot down last month, I do not need to discuss what part of
    > Jamaica because of privacy concerns, but I assure you....they are dead.

Privacy??? You are talking about a guy in the US illegally and you care not to
mention a killing fields part of Jamaica... Of course, the murder rate is about 5 to
6 times that of the US.

That is about all the family he was "close to" (A once a
    > month phone convo perhaps.)

He talks to family once a month? To me, that is closer than many Americans..

I find it hard to believe that anyone in Jamaica only has family on one small
"killing fields" section of the island.

    > Also....how naive can you be to say that it would be a good thing for him to
    > leave me to be around his family?

Do you think many people here haven't put up with being separated? The issue
wasn't about what he should do now. It was about what he should have done before
he turned 18 1/2.

    > FAMILY literally, not figuratively. He has never met 7/8ths of them, nor talked
    > to them or even seen pictures....And, YES we loved eachother before he was
    > 181/2....had I come across an intelligent group of people as are on this
    > newsgroup a few months ago, maybe our actions would have been different, and we
    > would have known about the ban...but you cant change the past. Also, if I were
    > Chinese, I could eat rats like they do in China..

BULL.. Just because some people eat rats doesn't mean you have to eat rats if you
live there. It would be REALLY a great idea to learn a bit about his country, maybe
drink some Ting or at least eat jerk chicken.

but why would I want to go eat Rats
    > if I was accustomed to hot dogs and hamburgers while being raised in America?

Then eat hotdogs and hamburgers...

Do you think they are unknown culinary delights there?

They even have KFC if you don't want to eat local food.

Im not putting down Jamaicans, or their culture, but if you
    > arent used to something, and you don't WANT to get accustomed to
    > it....then that it your perogotive.

Duh, yeah.. However, we are talking about viable options, not what you WANT to do...
Sometimes, we do things we don't want to do out of necessity. However, you view of
Jamaica is a very backward one. Go visit the country. It is close by.

    >Yes, his mother is still here, and recieving benefits from the government. I
    >can't stand her and she has messed her sons life up beyond belief. I don't know
    >how she has managed to stay here illegally and live off the system, but, trust
    >me, she has.

What government benefit does she, as an illegal alien get?

    >SHE is the type that I have little or no sympathy for. She should have filed the
    >necessary paperwork for herself and her son 17 years ago.

What paperwork would she have filed 17 years ago? Did she qualify as an
immigrant then?

Let's look at it the other way.. What if she had stayed in Jamaica with him?

.no excuse whatsoever, and no that Im married to him, I
    > have to work my butt off along with Jerome to fix her mistake..... I cant help
    > who I love....

No.... His mistake... His mother got him into the country in the only way she could.
I don't think she had a way to get him legally into the country. So, he has enjoyed
17 years of American life.

His mother tried to help him. When he became an adult, HE should have done something.
 
Old Sep 6th 2002, 3:15 am
  #15  
James Donovan
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LeightonJ <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...

    > There IS most certainly something wrong with going back to Jamaica when you have
    > only known America. You have to realiize....not everywhere in Jamaica is like the
    > resorts you see on Tv.

I know. I've been to Jamaica many, many times. Not all of Jamaica is like what you
see on "Third World Cop" either.

    > In fact, where most of Jerome's "family" resides, it is basically like a
    > killing ground.

If Jamaica is so bad, he should be able to apply for refugee status. There is a lot
of killing in some parts of New York City as well. Does that mean that the United
States is a bad place to live? No it's not! See my point?

    > There is a lot of violence and my husband wouldnt know how to survive there.
    > Imagine for a moment that YOU were born in Jamaica..

I worked on assignment there for a couple of years... Not easy, but you can
adjust to it.

    > ....different food,

Not all the food is different.

    > thick accents,

But they still speak English there.

    > different climate.

No different to Florida or Texas.

    > ...and then you moved to the US when you were 2, and were used to "american" food,
    > and cold winters,

The lovely tropical climate of Jamaica is easier to live in than the cold winters in
some parts of the USA.

    > and diverse culture....it just isnt fair if he would have to be sent
    > back... -Emily

It's not a question really of fair, but what if he doesn't have a choice? Part of
ending the worry is acceptance. He has to accept the fact that he was not meant to
be here in the USA. Once you learn accept that then he will have no worries. There
is alot that he can do in Jamaica. Jamaica is one of the most technologically
advanced countries in the Caribbean, and despite its weak dollar, alot of businesses
there are doing comparitively well. With CARICOM your husband can move to many other
countries in the Caribbean quite easily. I don't see why he absolutely has to live
in the USA.
 

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