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Retiring to the USA

Retiring to the USA

Old Jun 17th 2003, 2:30 pm
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Default Retiring to the USA

I've just taken a look at the US Embassy's pages on Immigration and it does seem very daunting. I have a son who has lived in the USA for the past 6 years, is getting married shortly to a USA citizen, and will never return to UK to live. My husband and I would like to retire to the USA in about 3-4 years, is there a simple way of achieving this?
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Old Jun 17th 2003, 2:45 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Dione
I've just taken a look at the US Embassy's pages on Immigration and it does seem very daunting. I have a son who has lived in the USA for the past 6 years, is getting married shortly to a USA citizen, and will never return to UK to live. My husband and I would like to retire to the USA in about 3-4 years, is there a simple way of achieving this?
The only real option for you is to get your son to sponsor you when he becomes a citizen. He can apply for citizenship 3 years after marrying the USC and it will take about a year. He can then sponsor you which will then take about 10 years. The earliest you could be here is 14 years!

There is no real other way, you can't just retire in the US, you have to have a visa and if you aren't eligible for any other (spousal or work) you will have to wait to be sponsored by your son.

I know this isn't the answer you wanted but I can't tell you anything else.

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Old Jun 17th 2003, 2:51 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Dione
I've just taken a look at the US Embassy's pages on Immigration and it does seem very daunting. I have a son who has lived in the USA for the past 6 years, is getting married shortly to a USA citizen, and will never return to UK to live. My husband and I would like to retire to the USA in about 3-4 years, is there a simple way of achieving this?
As well as requiring a visa to live in the States, as retirees, you will more than likely be responsible for paying your own healthcare. Compared to the UK, this is very costly, especially if you pay for it yourself (as opposed to having it subsidised by an employer).

Have you looked into the potential costs of healthcare in the state where you wish to live?




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Old Jun 17th 2003, 4:06 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Patrick
The only real option for you is to get your son to sponsor you when he becomes a citizen. He can apply for citizenship 3 years after marrying the USC and it will take about a year. He can then sponsor you which will then take about 10 years. The earliest you could be here is 14 years!

There is no real other way, you can't just retire in the US, you have to have a visa and if you aren't eligible for any other (spousal or work) you will have to wait to be sponsored by your son.

I know this isn't the answer you wanted but I can't tell you anything else.

Patrick
Patrick, it takes a lot less time than that to get parents across. Expecially if they are old and dependent. I don't know the exact criteria or the details but this is something the OP could look into. I do know that this is so ....
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Old Jun 17th 2003, 4:20 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Ranjini
Patrick, it takes a lot less time than that to get parents across. Expecially if they are old and dependent. I don't know the exact criteria or the details but this is something the OP could look into. I do know that this is so ....
Your right, parents come under immediate relative category (I must of got confused with brother or sister).

Well thats better news as once your son is a perminant resident it will only take a couple of years so you could be over there in six years.

You do have to consider carefully what NC Penguin said as well, Health care is very expensive over here and you will not qualify for any scheme. You must also look into your UK pension and make sure you can still gain access to it. You may have problems with the state pension but company pensions should be OK.

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Old Jun 17th 2003, 4:22 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Ranjini
Patrick, it takes a lot less time than that to get parents across. Expecially if they are old and dependent. I don't know the exact criteria or the details but this is something the OP could look into. I do know that this is so ....
Here is a link that places parents in the same category as a spouse ie. immediate relative. It goes on to say "The advantage of qualifying as an immediate relative is that there is no numerical limitation or backlogs for sponsorship"
http://www.murthy.com/irf.html
Good luck to the OP. I think what it means is that they can be here pretty quick after their son becomes a citizen...
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Old Jun 17th 2003, 4:28 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Patrick
..... You must also look into your UK pension and make sure you can still gain access to it. You may have problems with the state pension ....
The US is one of the countries where pensioners get their full UK state pension, and annual increases without a problem. bbc.co.uk ran a story related to this today - because pensioners in many former British colonies (Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, etc) don't.

Originally posted by Patrick
You're right, parents come under immediate relative category ....
When I said that a few weeks ago I think that it was you who gave me a roughing-up for not understanding the rules!
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Old Jun 17th 2003, 5:51 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

[i]
When I said that a few weeks ago I think that it was you who gave me a roughing-up for not understanding the rules!
You probably deserved a good roughing up for all the stupid things you have said that I missed, just call it a gimme!
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Old Jun 17th 2003, 7:28 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by NC Penguin
As well as requiring a visa to live in the States, as retirees, you will more than likely be responsible for paying your own healthcare. Compared to the UK, this is very costly, especially if you pay for it yourself (as opposed to having it subsidised by an employer).

Have you looked into the potential costs of healthcare in the state where you wish to live?




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Old Jun 17th 2003, 7:36 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Patrick
The only real option for you is to get your son to sponsor you when he becomes a citizen. He can apply for citizenship 3 years after marrying the USC and it will take about a year. He can then sponsor you which will then take about 10 years. The earliest you could be here is 14 years!

There is no real other way, you can't just retire in the US, you have to have a visa and if you aren't eligible for any other (spousal or work) you will have to wait to be sponsored by your son.

I know this isn't the answer you wanted but I can't tell you anything else.

Patrick
Thank you Patrick.
Is it likely to make a difference that I own a specialist company which can be located anywhere, would be able to invest in other companies? My husband and I are also on the Board of my son's USA company
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Old Jun 17th 2003, 7:41 pm
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Default Re: Retiring to the USA

Originally posted by Dione
Thank you Patrick.
Is it likely to make a difference that I own a specialist company which can be located anywhere, would be able to invest in other companies? My husband and I are also on the Board of my son's USA company
Well why didn't you say - you can either get an inter company transfer visa (L1) with you sons company or an E2 visa for your own company. The one to go for is the L1 as the E2 visa is not an immigration visa and if the shit hits the fan you will have to leave.

You can be there within 3 months if you go that route and don't have to wait for your son to get citizenship, technically you won't be retired though!

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Old Jun 18th 2003, 9:34 pm
  #12  
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Patrick,

Thanks very much for your reply. It simply didn't occur to me, although I, nor my husband, have never envisaged retiring. He's presently 77 and I, 56. As I'm sure you know over 50's in UK are regarded as being en route to the knacker's yard, socially or in business, and I allowed this to influence the language of my enquiry.

I'm very grateful,

-Dione
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