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Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Old Sep 17th 2007, 5:20 pm
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Default Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Hi all, hope someone can help.

I have a GC thru marriage and our 2 children are US Citizens (by birth). They have SSN's and Passports of their own. Any advice appreciated on going about registering them as British Citizens too. I know the US doesn't normally recognise dual nationality. Their still young, 3 & 4, but I would like to give them the additional opportunities for when they are older. Any do's and dont's I should be aware off.
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 5:24 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by superleeds View Post
Hi all, hope someone can help.

I have a GC thru marriage and our 2 children are US Citizens (by birth). They have SSN's and Passports of their own. Any advice appreciated on going about registering them as British Citizens too. I know the US doesn't normally recognise dual nationality. Their still young, 3 & 4, but I would like to give them the additional opportunities for when they are older. Any do's and dont's I should be aware off.
Try this: http://local.iee.org/usa/new_engl/NE...birthreg02.pdf

Rene
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 5:32 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by Noorah101 View Post
The cost looks out of date on that form. I recently got this one (haven't done anything with it yet though).

http://www.britainusa.com/consular/birthregapp.pdf
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 6:52 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by superleeds View Post
Hi all, hope someone can help.

I have a GC thru marriage and our 2 children are US Citizens (by birth). They have SSN's and Passports of their own. Any advice appreciated on going about registering them as British Citizens too. I know the US doesn't normally recognise dual nationality. Their still young, 3 & 4, but I would like to give them the additional opportunities for when they are older. Any do's and dont's I should be aware off.
I think you'll find that the US does formally recognize dual-citizenship in the case of someone born in the US. But I am unsure what is to be gained by registering their birth as opposed to merely getting them a UK passport (which I'm assuming they're entitled to based on your citizenship status)?
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 7:07 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by superleeds View Post
Hi all, hope someone can help.

I have a GC thru marriage and our 2 children are US Citizens (by birth). They have SSN's and Passports of their own. Any advice appreciated on going about registering them as British Citizens too. I know the US doesn't normally recognise dual nationality. Their still young, 3 & 4, but I would like to give them the additional opportunities for when they are older. Any do's and dont's I should be aware off.
As far as the US is concerned they are US citizens, but based on their parentage they are also British citizens.

It is irrelevant what either country thinks of the duality.
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 7:36 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by Giantaxe View Post
I think you'll find that the US does formally recognize dual-citizenship in the case of someone born in the US. But I am unsure what is to be gained by registering their birth as opposed to merely getting them a UK passport (which I'm assuming they're entitled to based on your citizenship status)?
There have been a few threads on this and I'm still undecided. Some people seem to say it is worthwhile but really it's a matter of paperwork. If the kid has all the documents required to get a passport (i.e. birth certificate of British parent(s)) then I don't see a reason for them to have a certificate proving they are British. It seems to me just a matter of which papers you'd rather give them when they're older.
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 10:50 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by neil View Post
There have been a few threads on this and I'm still undecided. Some people seem to say it is worthwhile but really it's a matter of paperwork. If the kid has all the documents required to get a passport (i.e. birth certificate of British parent(s)) then I don't see a reason for them to have a certificate proving they are British. It seems to me just a matter of which papers you'd rather give them when they're older.
The problem is that the "documents" you mention might be much harder to replace in 20-30 years time and child might have real hassle/delay proving their British citizenship without a consular birth certificate.

I can't really understand why some people even contemplate not getting one (despite what embassy officials say).
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 10:50 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by superleeds View Post
Hi all, hope someone can help.

I have a GC thru marriage and our 2 children are US Citizens (by birth). They have SSN's and Passports of their own. Any advice appreciated on going about registering them as British Citizens too. I know the US doesn't normally recognise dual nationality. Their still young, 3 & 4, but I would like to give them the additional opportunities for when they are older. Any do's and dont's I should be aware off.
Incidentally the U.S. is ok with dual citizenship for naturalized Americans too. If that's the reason you've not become a U.S. citizen think again.

http://www.richw.org/dualcit/
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 11:05 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by JAJ View Post
The problem is that the "documents" you mention might be much harder to replace in 20-30 years time and child might have real hassle/delay proving their British citizenship without a consular birth certificate.

I can't really understand why some people even contemplate not getting one (despite what embassy officials say).
Maybe I'm missing something here, but once you have a passport for said child, there is presumably no need for such a document:- you (or your child) has a passport and the UK has a record of the issuance of it. The only reason I think think of for getting a consular birth certificate is if you don't wish to get a British passport for the child for the forseeable future.
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Old Sep 17th 2007, 11:29 pm
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by Giantaxe View Post
Maybe I'm missing something here, but once you have a passport for said child, there is presumably no need for such a document:- you (or your child) has a passport and the UK has a record of the issuance of it. The only reason I think think of for getting a consular birth certificate is if you don't wish to get a British passport for the child for the forseeable future.
It's a record but not considered a conclusive record. Also, British passports overseas are issued by the Foreign Office, while consular birth records are maintained by the General Register Office.

Whenever a passport is lost/stolen, citizenship must be proved from scratch. Same is likely to apply when a person goes for a first adult passport.

Of course searches could be done etc if the documents were not available but these could takes weeks/months. A consular birth certificate can be replaced easily.

But obviously it's your child, your choice. I just can't see why so many people have such a difficulty with ensuring their children have civil documentation that is as complete as possible.
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Old Sep 18th 2007, 1:23 am
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by JAJ View Post
It's a record but not considered a conclusive record. Also, British passports overseas are issued by the Foreign Office, while consular birth records are maintained by the General Register Office.

Whenever a passport is lost/stolen, citizenship must be proved from scratch. Same is likely to apply when a person goes for a first adult passport.

Of course searches could be done etc if the documents were not available but these could takes weeks/months. A consular birth certificate can be replaced easily.

But obviously it's your child, your choice. I just can't see why so many people have such a difficulty with ensuring their children have civil documentation that is as complete as possible.
Hear, hear!

If my children had been born abroad I would have fought tooth and nail to ensure that they get British birth certificates.
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Old Sep 18th 2007, 1:28 am
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by Elvira View Post
Hear, hear!

If my children had been born abroad I would have fought tooth and nail to ensure that they get British birth certificates.
Yep me too.
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Old Sep 18th 2007, 1:58 am
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by JAJ View Post
It's a record but not considered a conclusive record. Also, British passports overseas are issued by the Foreign Office, while consular birth records are maintained by the General Register Office.

Whenever a passport is lost/stolen, citizenship must be proved from scratch. Same is likely to apply when a person goes for a first adult passport.
I know for sure the latter is incorrect: a passport for an under 16 is the same as one for over 16s except that it's validity is more limited. Renewal to an over 16 passport is treated the same as renewal of an adult passport. It is true, however, that if the child was originally added to the parent's passport, the application for an over 16 passport is treated as a first-time application.

As for citizenship having to be proven from scratch in the event of a passport being stolen/lost, I am unconvinced that is the case. The lost/stolen passport form asks for info about the prior passport, including the passport's number, date and place of issue. It doesn't say anything about proving citizenship from scratch. And I personally know someone who got their passport replaced whilst travelling abroad for an extended period on the basis of details of the previous passport and proof of his identity. It does, however, highlight the need when travelling to keep a record of one's passport details separate from the passport itself.

Last edited by Giantaxe; Sep 18th 2007 at 2:00 am.
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Old Sep 18th 2007, 2:21 am
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

A passport is just a travel document.

A birth certificate is........... so much more...

That's my tuppence, anyway
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Old Sep 18th 2007, 2:24 am
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Default Re: Registering my 2 children as British Citizens

Originally Posted by Giantaxe View Post
I know for sure the latter is incorrect: a passport for an under 16 is the same as one for over 16s except that it's validity is more limited. Renewal to an over 16 passport is treated the same as renewal of an adult passport. It is true, however, that if the child was originally added to the parent's passport, the application for an over 16 passport is treated as a first-time application.
May have been true in the past, it's not true any more, from a quick glance at the Passport Office website.

It's also now the case in Australia. First adult passport => new application.

As for citizenship having to be proven from scratch in the event of a passport being stolen/lost, I am unconvinced that is the case. The lost/stolen passport form asks for info about the prior passport, including the passport's number, date and place of issue. It doesn't say anything about proving citizenship from scratch. And I personally know someone who got their passport replaced whilst travelling abroad for an extended period on the basis of details of the previous passport and proof of his identity. It does, however, highlight the need when travelling to keep a record of one's passport details separate from the passport itself.
Really depends on whether you want your child to have to do things the easy way or the hard way.

One thing you can be sure of is that proving identity and citizenship is going to get harder in future. Not easier.

I really can't see how it can be responsible to turn down a chance to make life easier for your child in future. But it's your child, your choice.
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