Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > USA
Reload this Page >

Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Old May 18th 2017, 12:27 pm
  #1  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 9
Chloe81 is an unknown quantity at this point
Post Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Hi, I'm currently in the process of filing my k1-visa (fiancé) and have been wondering about jobs when I get over there. My fiance is born and raised in Florida and I am currently employed in England as a teaching assistant at a Primary school. I have 7 years experience in this field and I also have a bachelor's degree, although this isn't related to education. I was thinking of continuing working with children, either daycare, kindergarten or elementary. However, when I've looked at the job requirements, it seems I need to have some qualifications which I'm unsure of- a CDA which seems to be an accredited qualification. Would this depend upon the place of work or would it be something I would need to complete before even attempting to seek work? I know the education system will differ greatly from that in the uk.
Thanks for reading and taking the time! I know it's a long post! Any thoughts/ideas would be much appreciated.
Chloë x
Chloe81 is offline  
Old May 18th 2017, 9:54 pm
  #2  
Account Closed
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 38,867
ian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by Chloe81 View Post
However, when I've looked at the job requirements, it seems I need to have some qualifications which I'm unsure of- a CDA which seems to be an accredited qualification.
You'll want a CDA if you're going to work in Early Childhood Education (ECE). That covers just about everything from daycare to preschool to elementary school. If you want to teach, you'll need to take PRAXIS. If you want to teach and get promoted (and/or tenure), you'll want a masters degree (MAT).


Would this depend upon the place of work or would it be something I would need to complete before even attempting to seek work?
Possibly - but the US is driven by credentials... so if you can get credentials ahead of time, that'd be great.

Ian
ian-mstm is offline  
Old May 18th 2017, 10:50 pm
  #3  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 97
Melly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to beholdMelly is a splendid one to behold
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

I worked in a daycare without formal early childhood education, although I do have a degree in another field which did help. Also, you could apply for a Paraeducator role in the public school system, which is basically a Teacher's Assistant. I would look at the school district website in the county where you will live and see what their requirements are. In the state and county I live in, you are qualified to apply for a Paraeducator position, you would just have to take a general knowledge/basic skills test (Math & English). I would add that I am a green card holder, so not sure if your particular visa restricts you from this field in any way.
Melly is offline  
Old May 19th 2017, 3:35 am
  #4  
Austin. TX.
 
petitefrancaise's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 5,585
petitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond reputepetitefrancaise has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

My friend started working in a montessori school and loved it. She started as a teaching assistant ( she's a UK primary school teacher with special ed qualifications) and has now finished a 1 yr montessori course to become a real teacher again. Pay is not great.....
petitefrancaise is offline  
Old May 19th 2017, 12:25 pm
  #5  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 9
Chloe81 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Thanks for the info everyone. I'll do some more research and see what I can do. I may just do something completely different so need to weigh up my options. It's just I really enjoy working with kids so we will see
Chloe81 is offline  
Old May 19th 2017, 1:41 pm
  #6  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 2,693
carcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

It varies from state to state.

Generally in daycare/pre-schools you do not need a qualification at all, as those are private for-profit institutions.

To teach in a real school, each state has its own regulations though for most of them they are about the same. Skip the MAT (if you go that route) and get a full Master's Degree, because if you want to do something else later on (ie get a PhD etc) the MAT won't be accepted and for other professional roles they tend to specify full Master's.

Some states require the Praxis exam while others don't. I know many people who were certified in Florida and they did not do Praxis. They had to do a full Master's, and then take a State of Florida-written subject content exam and then a second State of Florida-written exam on teaching practice. Though there are other routes.

At one point a few years ago 43 states had reciprocity, meaning you could apply for registration in that state on the basis of being registered in the other state. Florida was one of the seven states that did not have that. I don't know if that has changed in the very recent past.
carcajou is offline  
Old May 19th 2017, 4:38 pm
  #7  
Account Closed
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 38,867
ian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
Skip the MAT (if you go that route) and get a full Master's Degree...
Sorry, but what the f**k do you think an MAT is? It stands for Master of Arts in Teaching. It is a "full Master's Degree".


... because if you want to do something else later on (ie get a PhD etc) the MAT won't be accepted and for other professional roles they tend to specify full Master's.
Why would someone skilled as a teacher want to do research? That's what the vast majority of PhDs do... research. For someone wanting a clinical doctorate, they'd be pursuing an EdD... and an MAT is quite appropriate for that.

I can only guess you've never actually been a teacher... which explains why you're posting using 3rd-hand knowledge.

Ian
ian-mstm is offline  
Old May 19th 2017, 5:07 pm
  #8  
Bob
BE Site Lead
 
Bob's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: MA, USA
Posts: 91,725
Bob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

One thing to possibly consider, would be trying to get on the list as a sub. Down my way at least, it's a lot easier to be a sub than a proper teacher and unless folks have teaching experience in the state, jobs are more likely to be offered to those who have been a sub in the district.

It could be very different for where you plan to be.

Also, down my way, pretty much anyone working in pre-school has a masters or is working towards a masters. The only folks who might not, tend to run their own in home daycare but with so much competition in the area, even those, folks have some sort of educational degree behind them.
Bob is offline  
Old May 20th 2017, 12:06 am
  #9  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 2,693
carcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by ian-mstm View Post
Sorry, but what the f**k do you think an MAT is? It stands for Master of Arts in Teaching. It is a "full Master's Degree".



Why would someone skilled as a teacher want to do research? That's what the vast majority of PhDs do... research. For someone wanting a clinical doctorate, they'd be pursuing an EdD... and an MAT is quite appropriate for that.

I can only guess you've never actually been a teacher... which explains why you're posting using 3rd-hand knowledge.

Ian

Don't be rude unless you know what you are talking about, which you do not.

An MAT is different from a full Master's and is not regarded as equivalent in academia. I am sorry the title of the qualification confuses you. The two qualifications have different focus areas and if you want to go to take on a PhD later applicants may find a lot of trouble doing so with a MAT. Unless you are applying at a diploma mill, as they will not care.

At one point the MATs were only half as long as the full Masters, that was the big selling point of them, that you could go into teaching a year faster BUT the trade-off was it a cul-de-sac as an academic or career qualification.

Your question about why a teacher would want to do research shocked me. You apparently are unaware of the huge number of research-based roles appearing in central offices and in schools themselves that require academic research training (or even just new things in the current teacher standards about data analysis). A PhD is different from an EdD and are not viewed as equivalent by many in academia or in institutions - there is often an EdD penalty in job applications for roles requiring doctorates - which is why if your advisor is worth his or her salt they will direct you into the PhD program and not the EdD one.

Many teachers leave the classroom to pursue other roles in education after a few years (you are aware of all the turnover in the field?) and if OP wants to do so later on - even if OP thinks he/she never will right now - then OP will be far better served with a Masters than an MAT and finding they have to repeat stuff or take new stuff later on as a pre-requisite.

Please do not post third hand information.

Good-bye.
carcajou is offline  
Old May 20th 2017, 1:16 am
  #10  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 2,693
carcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by Bob View Post
One thing to possibly consider, would be trying to get on the list as a sub. Down my way at least, it's a lot easier to be a sub than a proper teacher and unless folks have teaching experience in the state, jobs are more likely to be offered to those who have been a sub in the district.

It could be very different for where you plan to be.

Generally, yes, if you are any good as a sub you can be first in line when a position opens up as you are the "safe" candidate whom they know.

Bob, what is the daily rate for a sub where you live? A few years ago out my way it was under $100 a day, and so if a new prospect plans to go that route, they need to have some kind of financial plan in place or evening employment to tide them over until they get a full position.

Last edited by Bob; May 21st 2017 at 1:28 am. Reason: Fixing quote
carcajou is offline  
Old May 20th 2017, 1:40 am
  #11  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 2,693
carcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

By the way that astounds me that so many pre-school teachers have a Master's in your area. They don't need it, it's not a certificated profession, and a Master's is a huge investment in a job that (where I'm from) only pays a little more than $10 an hour. Unless of course they are eventually planning to do something else within early care or go on to become a certificated kindergarten/early elementary teacher, go into research, etc.

Last edited by carcajou; May 20th 2017 at 1:42 am.
carcajou is offline  
Old May 20th 2017, 11:46 am
  #12  
Account Closed
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 38,867
ian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond reputeian-mstm has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
The two qualifications have different focus areas and if you want to go to take on a PhD later applicants may find a lot of trouble doing so with a MAT.
True - which is why most people with an MAT pursue an EdD and not a PhD. They're clinicians, not researchers. They actually do, rather than study the doing.

Your prejudice is showing!

Ian
ian-mstm is offline  
Old May 20th 2017, 12:24 pm
  #13  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 2,693
carcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond reputecarcajou has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by ian-mstm View Post
True - which is why most people with an MAT pursue an EdD and not a PhD. They're clinicians, not researchers. They actually do, rather than study the doing.

Your prejudice is showing!

Ian
I don't have a prejudice. MAT will get someone into the classroom faster but can be an obstacle for for future options. Ed.D. is not substantially different from a Ph.D. but there is bias against it in practical hiring and in academia.

In terms of teaching jobs, MAT vs M.Ed. does not matter in front of any teacher hiring committee.
carcajou is offline  
Old May 21st 2017, 1:34 am
  #14  
Bob
BE Site Lead
 
Bob's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: MA, USA
Posts: 91,725
Bob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
Bob, what is the daily rate for a sub where you live? A few years ago out my way it was under $100 a day, and so if a new prospect plans to go that route, they need to have some kind of financial plan in place or evening employment to tide them over until they get a full position.
It's a bit of a range it would seem. A town over, then our town and the town over the other side, ranges from $80-150 a day. A town a couple spots over is looking for a sub for 1 year to cover a sabbatical and are offering $48K, middle school English.
Bob is offline  
Old May 21st 2017, 1:36 am
  #15  
Bob
BE Site Lead
 
Bob's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: MA, USA
Posts: 91,725
Bob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond reputeBob has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Qualifications to work in education-are they different?

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
By the way that astounds me that so many pre-school teachers have a Master's in your area. They don't need it, it's not a certificated profession, and a Master's is a huge investment in a job that (where I'm from) only pays a little more than $10 an hour. Unless of course they are eventually planning to do something else within early care or go on to become a certificated kindergarten/early elementary teacher, go into research, etc.
It's pretty much a requirement just because there are so many looking for that kind of job that it's a simple filter.

Plus the hourly rate is about double what you're looking at, unless it's a home care place.
Bob is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.