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Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

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Old Dec 15th 2017, 11:23 pm
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Default Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Which would be best gained if converting from masters of science to specialize in science teaching?

Ideally focused on longer term teaching in UK
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Old Dec 17th 2017, 12:37 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Teaching qualifications are not interchangeable, ie you cannot teach in NZ on a UK qualification or vice versa.

Therefore if you are going to teach in the UK you should get a UK qualification.

If you are going to teach in NZ first, you need to get an NZ qualification, and then get that recognised in the UK.

"Science teaching" would be secondary level so you would need to have content units, and then a degree program leading to a secondary teaching qualification. This would include a 45-day final teaching practicum (in NZ).

Universities - shockingly - aren't always aware of what content units are needed for their prospective teachers. Whatever they tell you make sure you verify it with the Department of Education (not the registration board).
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Old Dec 17th 2017, 5:37 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
Teaching qualifications are not interchangeable, ie you cannot teach in NZ on a UK qualification or vice versa.

Therefore if you are going to teach in the UK you should get a UK qualification.

If you are going to teach in NZ first, you need to get an NZ qualification, and then get that recognised in the UK.

"Science teaching" would be secondary level so you would need to have content units, and then a degree program leading to a secondary teaching qualification. This would include a 45-day final teaching practicum (in NZ).

Universities - shockingly - aren't always aware of what content units are needed for their prospective teachers. Whatever they tell you make sure you verify it with the Department of Education (not the registration board).
Wife was considering a transition course here in NZ for 12 months, but considers the general state of teaching so poor she would rather await the return to the UK.
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 6:15 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
Teaching qualifications are not interchangeable, ie you cannot teach in NZ on a UK qualification or vice versa.

Therefore if you are going to teach in the UK you should get a UK qualification.

If you are going to teach in NZ first, you need to get an NZ qualification, and then get that recognised in the UK.
Don't quite understand what you're saying here? Yes of course you can have a UK teaching qualification and then teach in NZ and vice versa.
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 6:40 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by j19fmm View Post
Don't quite understand what you're saying here? Yes of course you can have a UK teaching qualification and then teach in NZ and vice versa.
No, of course you cannot. You need NZ registration to teach in NZ government schools. "To be employed as a teacher in New Zealand, you need to be registered and hold a current practising certificate:"

https://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/...rseas-teachers

That means New Zealand registration. A full UK teaching qualification will exempt someone from having to go through the NZQA comparability assessment (this is a recent development), but they still need to submit an application and be registered in NZ. Any prospective registration applicant should check very carefully that their UK program meets criteria as historically some have had trouble.

Therefore, my comment to the OP was something along the lines of, take the path of least resistance, and do the relevant program for the country he/she wants to teach in. That is pretty standard advice and will also be beneficial in the job search, since most principals are more comfortable hiring teachers who were trained in-country.
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 6:48 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
No, of course you cannot. You need NZ registration to teach in NZ government schools. "To be employed as a teacher in New Zealand, you need to be registered and hold a current practising certificate:"

https://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/...rseas-teachers

That means New Zealand registration. A full UK teaching qualification will exempt someone from having to go through the NZQA comparability assessment (this is a recent development), but they still need to submit an application and be registered in NZ. Any prospective registration applicant should check very carefully that their UK program meets criteria as historically some have had trouble.

Therefore, my comment to the OP was something along the lines of, take the path of least resistance, and do the relevant program for the country he/she wants to teach in. That is pretty standard advice and will also be beneficial in the job search, since most principals are more comfortable hiring teachers who were trained in-country.
No, you said teaching qualifications are not interchangeable. I am a UK trained teacher and now teach in NZ. Yes of course you need to be registered as a teacher - as in any other profession. And yes, you need to have the correct teaching degree. As for Principals being more comfortable hiring teachers trained in the country I would also disagree. They will hire the best person for the job.
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 7:39 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

If you are a UK trained teacher now teaching in NZ, then you should know that my comment was correct. You cannot just flash a UK qualification and get hired. You have to go through the process. This isn't 1950. The sun has set on the Empire.

You would also know that if they were interchangeable, things like NZQA wouldn't be needed. Even teachers with Qualified Teacher Status will run into difficulty if they did not have training up to what NZQA and the Education Council want.

I completely disagree with you that principals don't care about local training. If OP is looking at returning to the UK, he/she will be competing against local candidates with experience in the local curriculum with local referees and local networks. Curriculum knowledge is almost always a selection criteria and you should know that. If there is an unknown candidate (which OP may be) trained overseas with no local curriculum experience in the learning area (which will be the case for OP) that will be a disadvantage, and perhaps an insurmountable one.

If OP is going to train in a NZ curriculum for a teaching pathway in the UK, that is a decided disadvantage for OP barring substantial local experience in that learning area or local referees, which OP will not have. Doing a UK program will tick that box while simultaneously allowing OP to develop a local network.
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 9:22 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
If you are a UK trained teacher now teaching in NZ, then you should know that my comment was correct. You cannot just flash a UK qualification and get hired. You have to go through the process. This isn't 1950. The sun has set on the Empire.

You would also know that if they were interchangeable, things like NZQA wouldn't be needed. Even teachers with Qualified Teacher Status will run into difficulty if they did not have training up to what NZQA and the Education Council want.

I completely disagree with you that principals don't care about local training. If OP is looking at returning to the UK, he/she will be competing against local candidates with experience in the local curriculum with local referees and local networks. Curriculum knowledge is almost always a selection criteria and you should know that. If there is an unknown candidate (which OP may be) trained overseas with no local curriculum experience in the learning area (which will be the case for OP) that will be a disadvantage, and perhaps an insurmountable one.

If OP is going to train in a NZ curriculum for a teaching pathway in the UK, that is a decided disadvantage for OP barring substantial local experience in that learning area or local referees, which OP will not have. Doing a UK program will tick that box while simultaneously allowing OP to develop a local network.
No-one said that you could just flash a UK qualification and get hired. Of course you hav to register. But that doesn't mean that you cannot teach in NZ having done your teacher training degree in the UK (or vice versa).
One does not need to do a teaching degree within NZ in order to teach there any more than one has to do a teaching degree within the Uk to teach there.

Registration and qualifications are completely different things .
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 9:40 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

I am fully aware of that, thank you, the context of what I said was clear and I suspect the other poster was trolling as much as anything.

The context of the statement is, if OP is planning to teach in the UK, then the UK program is better. Regardless it is not a decision that should be taken in isolation of all the other factors that go into it.

If OP wants to re-train in science and spin that wheel in NZ, it would be highly unusual to do a UK program, and would probably attract negative attention. You do not want hiring committees looking at a CV and saying "huh? Why'd they do that?" which is what would happen if a current NZ teacher looking to continue in NZ took a UK curriculum program. If OP is already teaching in NZ - go speak to the Deputy and the Science head and see what they say about the route to take.

If OP wants to go back to the UK, he/she would be starting anew and needs all the local context possible. That includes developing a local network and being able to demonstrate local curriculum knowledge, neither of which will be served by an NZ program. Therefore a UK program is better.

This is not rocket science.
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Old Feb 4th 2018, 4:39 pm
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
If you are a UK trained teacher now teaching in NZ, then you should know that my comment was correct. You cannot just flash a UK qualification and get hired. You have to go through the process. This isn't 1950. The sun has set on the Empire.

You would also know that if they were interchangeable, things like NZQA wouldn't be needed. Even teachers with Qualified Teacher Status will run into difficulty if they did not have training up to what NZQA and the Education Council want.

I completely disagree with you that principals don't care about local training. If OP is looking at returning to the UK, he/she will be competing against local candidates with experience in the local curriculum with local referees and local networks. Curriculum knowledge is almost always a selection criteria and you should know that. If there is an unknown candidate (which OP may be) trained overseas with no local curriculum experience in the learning area (which will be the case for OP) that will be a disadvantage, and perhaps an insurmountable one.

If OP is going to train in a NZ curriculum for a teaching pathway in the UK, that is a decided disadvantage for OP barring substantial local experience in that learning area or local referees, which OP will not have. Doing a UK program will tick that box while simultaneously allowing OP to develop a local network.
What do you mean "if I am"?
Wow, I must surely bow to your superior knowledge of being a qualified teacher in both the UK and NZ.
However dear OP if I can help at all just drop me a PM.
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Old Feb 5th 2018, 9:19 am
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by j19fmm View Post
What do you mean "if I am"?
Wow, I must surely bow to your superior knowledge of being a qualified teacher in both the UK and NZ.
However dear OP if I can help at all just drop me a PM.
. . . and finishing off with a personal attack. Awesome.

OP, instead of pm'ing, I recommend you contact someone who knows something about it, and makes appointments to speak to British principals on your next trip to the UK and see what they say - with a specific focus on advice from them on getting hired. I am sure you will find that they will say pretty much similar things.

Good luck.
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Old Feb 5th 2018, 12:16 pm
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by carcajou View Post
. . . and finishing off with a personal attack. Awesome.

OP, instead of pm'ing, I recommend you contact someone who knows something about it, and makes appointments to speak to British principals on your next trip to the UK and see what they say - with a specific focus on advice from them on getting hired. I am sure you will find that they will say pretty much similar things.

Good luck.
No, what was 'awesome' was the OP providing information from the coal face.

What is not 'awesome' is you, who jumps onto every subject in every country you purport to have lived in and then proceeds to spout off your opinion as if it's the only one that has any validity, responding with breathtaking arrogance if someone dares to disagree with you.

Your responses are consistently patronising, dogmatic and far more often than not based on screed of statistics that you Google in what appears to be the hope of appearing to know what you're talking about. Even when you're shown to be wrong you make a song and dance about Standing By Your Opinion, as if it bloody matters to anyone except you!

Lighten up for God's sake, it's a community forum. And now I'll let you have the last word - because that's another thing you always do
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Old Feb 5th 2018, 3:07 pm
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Default Re: Teaching Qualification better UK or NZ

Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
No, what was 'awesome' was the OP providing information from the coal face.

What is not 'awesome' is you, who jumps onto every subject in every country you purport to have lived in and then proceeds to spout off your opinion as if it's the only one that has any validity, responding with breathtaking arrogance if someone dares to disagree with you.

Your responses are consistently patronising, dogmatic and far more often than not based on screed of statistics that you Google in what appears to be the hope of appearing to know what you're talking about. Even when you're shown to be wrong you make a song and dance about Standing By Your Opinion, as if it bloody matters to anyone except you!

Lighten up for God's sake, it's a community forum. And now I'll let you have the last word - because that's another thing you always do
What's not on is you coming on here and blasting a poster for encouraging an OP to contact experts and seek official advice, and then also belittling them for posting links to official information.

The education field is a thicket of regulation and policy that can be challenging to navigate, even when one is in their home country, which is why I am constantly advising posters to contact experts and official bodies. You seem to hate that I do that but frankly it's the opposite of arrogance, and posters have no way to tell the identity or experience of anyone on here. That is also why I have started posting links to official agencies or news in threads I comment on.

Resorting to name-calling and labels like "arrogant" is also just a lazy way to try and smear someone without having to contribute or provide any information.

I absolutely "Stand By My Opinion" that OP should contact regulatory bodies to make sure whatever program they sign up for will be recognised, and then to contact principals to gauge hiring conditions and gain advice. What they say is not "opinion."

Good luck OP.
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