British Expats

British Expats (https://britishexpats.com/forum/)
-   Take it Outside! (https://britishexpats.com/forum/take-outside-67/)
-   -   Post EU Referendum (https://britishexpats.com/forum/take-outside-67/post-eu-referendum-879308/)

InVinoVeritas Mar 10th 2017 6:01 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DaveLovesDee (Post 12201949)
Or buy it from Amazon....... :p

1 Pack of 12 Novelty Napkins Either 50, 20, 10 Notes supplied at Random



Well, when you're already in a deep hole, it's usually a good idea to stop digging.



If the UK had only be an EU member since 2007, and had there not been the big banking f-up in 2008, you could have had a point. But as neither of those were true, maybe you should try again.

This is the graph from 1900 to 2016,

http://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/in...chartDp13t.png

Note that the UK national debt fell until around the time we joined the EU and then stabilised. Prior to the fall in the 1950's, the nationals debt had been much higher because of the costs of fighting two world wars.

Lies, damned lies and EU statistics.

DaveLovesDee Mar 10th 2017 6:14 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12201955)
Lies, damned lies and EU statistics.

Do grow up!

Your BS has been called out for what it is. Either prove your case or quit BS-ing.

InVinoVeritas Mar 10th 2017 7:03 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DaveLovesDee (Post 12201961)
Do grow up!

Your BS has been called out for what it is. Either prove your case or quit BS-ing.

You are not what I would call a very credible judge of such matters. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

Red Eric Mar 10th 2017 8:17 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
Was that a shimmy or a sidestep?

amideislas Mar 10th 2017 9:07 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12201986)
You are not what I would call a very credible judge of such matters. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

I don't know. But you know, "EU" statistics have so far been more accurate then "UK" statistics. That was your most likely trigger point.

DaveLovesDee Mar 10th 2017 9:27 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12201986)
You are not what I would call a very credible judge of such matters. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

And what makes your opinion more credible than mine?

But surely if you claim the first graph showing the rise in the UK national debt as rising sharply since 2007 as showing that this is down to our membership of the EU, then you can accept that the graph showing the UK national debt over a longer period (which includes the same data from 2007 onwards) as also being correct, when this latter graph shows stability since outr actual date of joining the EU in 1973.

And the data came from the UK, not the EU.

amideislas Mar 11th 2017 6:00 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
May Hears Hard Truths About Brexit as EU Prepares for Talks - Bloomberg

Brexit is about to get real. Yet we are nowhere near ready for it
The triggering of Article 50 will kickstart negotiations of mindbending complexity. Brexiteers should drop the hubris and get to work


Philip Hammond’s budget on Wednesday illustrated the point neatly. The country is about to leave its largest export market, a decision with enormous economic implications. The chancellor had the floor for nearly an hour, his obligation to provide an assessment of the present and future prospects of the British economy. Did he so much as mention the imminent exit from the single market? No. Incredibly, he made just two fleeting references to the EU in the entire address.

InVinoVeritas Mar 11th 2017 6:29 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Red Eric (Post 12202002)
Was that a shimmy or a sidestep?

More of a wind-up actually, Eric ;)

I just cannot believe that the Remainers on here cannot accept the decision made by a majority of voters to leave the EU. They prefer to re-run the arguments, ad infinitum, rather than get on with their lives and they are so obsessed that any prod with a sharp stick will get them going again.

I would compare this with someone who discovers their wife/husband has been having an affair with the neighbour for the last 3 years and then goes on to alienate friends and family by endlessly regurgitating their story with ever-increasing emphasis on their virtue and their ex-partner's stupidity and selfishness.

Enough people wanted to leave the EU that it will happen despite every argument and objection mustered by Remainers. People voted to leave for many different reasons so it is not enough simply to dispute an individual's logic or decision-making process. I can interpret a graph differently to others based upon my prejudice, as well as my perception of the prejudice of those presenting said graph. It doesn't matter. My views are my own and if enough people share that view then democracy will do the rest.

I can say that a majority voted to leave the EU and you may well say that a majority did not vote to leave (which is true) or that people did not vote for the type of Brexit which Theresa May proposes (which may be true).

But where does that get us, must we have a referendum on every decision made by the Government because that particular question was not put to us or because new information has since come to light?

There is no point in this "I'm right and you're wrong debate" over something which has been decided. Like the cuckolded husband/wife, you have to accept what happened, you have get over it and get on with your life. Surprisingly, the world did not end and is showing no signs of doing so.

amideislas Mar 11th 2017 6:34 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
For me, it's the irony. Turkeys voting for Christmas.

jimenato Mar 11th 2017 6:51 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
For me, it's the vacant - open mouthed look (often with a little dribble of spittle running from the corner) when you tell one that his particular reason for leaving the EU wasn't anything to do with EU and leaving it won't solve it. Amuses me every time.

Red Eric Mar 11th 2017 7:10 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
I get the giggles about the way they try to shut down discussions. It's almost like they're worried about something - which I suppose they ought to be, given the amount that still has to be decided and the various ways this could all pan out.

Oooops - did I just say I don't accept the result of the democratic referendum there?

DaveLovesDee Mar 11th 2017 7:11 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12202230)
I just cannot believe that the Remainers on here cannot accept the decision made by a majority of voters to leave the EU.

As I've said a number of times previously, I accept that the majority of those who voted, voted to leave the EU. I also accept that we will be leaving the EU as a result of that vote.


They prefer to re-run the arguments, ad infinitum, rather than get on with their lives and they are so obsessed that any prod with a sharp stick will get them going again.
What I don't accept is that the majority voted for a 'hard Brexit' with no single market access, no financial services passporting, and/or no customs union/free trade agreement. Many leavers said (even on here) that they'd have considered staying in the EU had it only been a trading union.

Leaving the EU, as asked on the referendum question, only requires that the UK ceases to be an EU member state around 2 years after Article 50 is triggered. The question asked nothing about whether the UK should 'hard' or 'soft' Brexit.

And if you don't like that the arguments are re-run, maybe you should try giving credible answers to the questions asked, instead of attacking those who ask the questions.

InVinoVeritas Mar 11th 2017 7:34 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DaveLovesDee (Post 12202245)
And if you don't like that the arguments are re-run, maybe you should try giving credible answers to the questions asked, instead of attacking those who ask the questions.

In which case, just ask the questions and leave out the childish criticism of those who voted to leave (I mean "you" in the plural, not you specifically).

So far the predicitions of the Remainers have proven to be seriously wide of the mark but of course they, like everyone else, will have valid concerns as to the outcome.

Also, thus far, we are in pre-negotiation with all the nuances that brings, so a lot of what is said by the various players is purely rhetorical and should not to be taken too seriously.

amideislas Mar 11th 2017 8:24 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
Did Richard Dawkins just perfectly sum up the problem with Brexit?
Richard Dawkins can be at times a controversial figure. But what he had to say on Brexit and the EU referendum might just be the most common sense anyone’s ever spoken.



Constitutional amendments are – or should be – hard to achieve. In America, it takes a two-thirds majority in both houses of Congress.

It’s easy to see why the bar is set so high. Unlike ordinary lawmaking, constitutional changes are for keeps.
...
He handed over this massively important decision to a simple majority of ill-informed voters.

The fleeting opinion, on just one day, of a slender majority of an ignorant and misled public is now touted as the sacred and unchangeable word of “the British people”.

Not just for the next five years, as in an ordinary election, but long after we are no longer around to reap the consequences.

iano Mar 11th 2017 9:05 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12202254)
of course they, like everyone else, will have valid concerns as to the outcome..

...and is a far more accurate observation than "the Remainers on here cannot accept the decision".

Disappointing really, as this is supposed to be a forum for debate and argument and we don't ever see that from the Leavers, the very people that won the day. It's either relentless Merkel/EU bashing from the one-trick pony or incoherent ramblings from a gibbering rock ape. :p

None of us on here know THE plan, but it would make things a lot more interesting to debate YOUR plan, the very people who wanted us to leave the EU ? The UK is about to give up single market membership, customs union membership, large chunks of inward investment and potentially sizeable chunks of the UK itself, must be plenty of alternatives you could suggest to fill the gap other than the fabled '£350 million a week'.

"let's put a tiger in the tank" or "a fantastic future for 'Global' Britain" just doesn't cut it I'm afraid.


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:55 pm.

Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.