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-   -   Post EU Referendum (https://britishexpats.com/forum/take-outside-67/post-eu-referendum-879308/)

Annetje Oct 16th 2017 9:03 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Garbatellamike (Post 12362490)
:rofl::rofl::rofl: how many more times, it is Vulcan Chess not a ball game ;)

You just don't want to admit you LOST the ball

Garbatellamike Oct 16th 2017 9:06 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Annetje (Post 12362499)
You just don't want to admit you LOST the ball

it wasn't me it was a big boy and then he ran away

Annetje Oct 16th 2017 9:13 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Garbatellamike (Post 12362504)
it wasn't me it was a big boy and then he ran away

:eek::rofl::lol::nod:

morpeth Oct 16th 2017 10:05 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Shard (Post 12362359)
True, but there's still no reason to inflict significant damage to the economy and marginalise ourselves.

A couple of days ago I saw an EU somebody chastising the US on something. I couldn't help think how much economic/poltical power we in the EU have as a bloc compared to a single nation griping about the US (or China or wherever). This is a different world from 1940's when Britain and France were colonial powers and big players on the international stage. This is what the dewy eyed majors at Brexit Towers don't quite understand.

Cant disagree there is no reason to inflict economic damage for nebulous benefits ( still waiting for an explanation of what they will be since it seems the UK will in the end bend to some arrangement with the EU.)

Red Eric Oct 16th 2017 10:15 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Annetje (Post 12362499)
You just don't want to admit you LOST the ball

I think he might have won, actually ;), but like the others, he's still having to get over it.

GeniB Oct 17th 2017 6:46 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Garbatellamike (Post 12362422)
I am joking about the hatred but only one of us is making things up and it isn't me

here, for the hard of understanding, are the latest polls... UK Polling Report

Well isn't that interesting.. You base TWO posts on 'Hatred' THEN say you were 'joking' ? Then throw in the highly suspect and proven to be unreliable .'Polling'

I think its you who needs to get real and stop making things up Garbilla :thumbdown:

Garbatellamike Oct 17th 2017 6:51 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by GeniB (Post 12362703)
Well isn't that interesting.. You base TWO posts on 'Hatred' THEN say you were 'joking' ? Then throw in the highly suspect and proven to be unreliable .'Polling'

I think its you who needs to get real and stop making things up Garbilla :thumbdown:

you fibber. You need to fix your predictive text because when you type:

I think

It is changing it to:

the entire country thinks

:nod:

Your views are not those of the entire country or even your vast majority and it is dishonest of you not to withdraw your remarks.

scrubbedexpat0105 Oct 17th 2017 8:43 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Cape Blue (Post 12362327)
You don't mention why and how this "absolutely cataclysmic Armageddon" occurs - could you enlighten us?

I am (and we were) explicitly talking about the consequences of a hard Brexit. A soft Brexit is another matter. That is, however, extremely unlikely to happen; realistically the best scenario for the UK is that it will show some goodwill with regard to the settling of its financial obligations and to arrangements for the Irish border and EU citizens' rights and will in return be given a transitional arrangement that allows it to prepare for a hard Brexit. At the moment, even that is looking far from promising.

Numerous studies have been conducted of the consequences of a hard Brexit. One of them can be found here:

fedtrust.co.uk/our-work-on-europe/hard-brexit-international-trade-and-the-wto-scenario/

This explicitly focuses upon the hit taken by industry.

An LSE report puts the drop in financial trade resulting from the loss of passporting rights at up to 25%:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...lse-study-says

Another major aspect that has to be considered is the resulting loss of tax revenues at a time when the UK is already struggling to fund its public services, and the implications of that in particular for the NHS.

The Irish border question, too, is an issue that would be a disaster in its own right were it not overshadowed by the wider Brexit issue. There is going to be a hard border between the UK and the EU; the only question is where that border will be located. One has to wonder at the naivety of those who think that the EU will suddenly be willing to make its own external border porous when the UK has for years pursued a very hard border policy of its own, even between the UK and other EU member states. Consequently, the very existence of the GFA is at risk.

I don't think the pro-Brexit lobby want to hear such analyses, though. It's much easier to dismiss them as "Project Fear".

Annetje Oct 17th 2017 8:50 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Watchpost (Post 12362751)
I am (and we were) explicitly talking about the consequences of a hard Brexit. A soft Brexit is another matter. That is, however, extremely unlikely to happen; realistically the best scenario for the UK is that it will show some goodwill with regard to the settling of its financial obligations and to arrangements for the Irish border and EU citizens' rights and will in return be given a transitional arrangement that allows it to prepare for a hard Brexit. At the moment, even that is looking far from promising.

Numerous studies have been conducted of the consequences of a hard Brexit. One of them can be found here:

fedtrust.co.uk/our-work-on-europe/hard-brexit-international-trade-and-the-wto-scenario/

This explicitly focuses upon the hit taken by industry.

An LSE report puts the drop in financial trade resulting from the loss of passporting rights at up to 25%:

www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-23/u-k-banks-loss-of-eu-passport-a-major-threat-lse-study-says

Another major aspect that has to be considered is the resulting loss of tax revenues at a time when the UK is already struggling to fund its public services, and the implications of that in particular for the NHS.

The Irish border question, too, is an issue that would be a disaster in its own right were it not overshadowed by the wider Brexit issue. There is going to be a hard border between the UK and the EU; the only question is where that border will be located. One has to wonder at the naivety of those who think that the EU will suddenly be willing to make its own external border porous when the UK has for years pursued a very hard border policy of its own, even between the UK and other EU member states. Consequently, the very existence of the GFA is at risk.

I don't think the pro-Brexit lobby want to hear such analyses, though. It's much easier to dismiss them as "Project Fear".

:goodpost:

GeniB Oct 17th 2017 9:09 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Garbatellamike (Post 12362705)
you fibber. You need to fix your predictive text because when you type:

I think

It is changing it to:

the entire country thinks

:nod:

Your views are not those of the entire country or even your vast majority and it is dishonest of you not to withdraw your remarks.

You are nit picking aren't you...Prove to me that 'most of the country' is perfectly happy with this governments handling of their 'promised' Brexit.(not with dodgy polls) .That 'most of the country' is prepared to' limp on' whilst the world watches aghast at the incompetence going on within the Conservative party.I do know that 48.1% of the UK must be seething with anger. right now Of the 51.9% I would hazard an educated guess that they are not pleased to say the least. It would only take 2% of them to change their minds. Not many in the grand scheme of things heh
Don't call me a 'fibber' or 'dishonest' Garbelli.. It's childish and doesn't become you

jimenato Oct 17th 2017 9:50 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Watchpost (Post 12362751)
I am (and we were) explicitly talking about the consequences of a hard Brexit. A soft Brexit is another matter. That is, however, extremely unlikely to happen; realistically the best scenario for the UK is that it will show some goodwill with regard to the settling of its financial obligations and to arrangements for the Irish border and EU citizens' rights and will in return be given a transitional arrangement that allows it to prepare for a hard Brexit. At the moment, even that is looking far from promising.

Numerous studies have been conducted of the consequences of a hard Brexit. One of them can be found here:

fedtrust.co.uk/our-work-on-europe/hard-brexit-international-trade-and-the-wto-scenario/

This explicitly focuses upon the hit taken by industry.

An LSE report puts the drop in financial trade resulting from the loss of passporting rights at up to 25%:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...lse-study-says

Another major aspect that has to be considered is the resulting loss of tax revenues at a time when the UK is already struggling to fund its public services, and the implications of that in particular for the NHS.

The Irish border question, too, is an issue that would be a disaster in its own right were it not overshadowed by the wider Brexit issue. There is going to be a hard border between the UK and the EU; the only question is where that border will be located. One has to wonder at the naivety of those who think that the EU will suddenly be willing to make its own external border porous when the UK has for years pursued a very hard border policy of its own, even between the UK and other EU member states. Consequently, the very existence of the GFA is at risk.

I don't think the pro-Brexit lobby want to hear such analyses, though. It's much easier to dismiss them as "Project Fear".

:goodpost:
Excellent stuff. Not that it will definitely all happen but you can be sure that those leavers who haven't lost interest will now have their hands over their ears singing na na I can't hear you.

InVinoVeritas Oct 17th 2017 10:26 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by GeniB (Post 12362774)
You are nit picking aren't you...Prove to me that 'most of the country' is perfectly happy with this governments handling of their 'promised' Brexit.(not with dodgy polls) .That 'most of the country' is prepared to' limp on' whilst the world watches aghast at the incompetence going on within the Conservative party.I do know that 48.1% of the UK must be seething with anger. right now Of the 51.9% I would hazard an educated guess that they are not pleased to say the least. It would only take 2% of them to change their minds. Not many in the grand scheme of things heh
Don't call me a 'fibber' or 'dishonest' Garbelli.. It's childish and doesn't become you

Whilst I think the UK government has put itself in a seriously weak position by calling (and almost losing) a General Election, it is surprising that support for Brexit has held up amongst voters, even slighly increasing according to some polls, this despite most voters acknowledging the prospect of being financially worse off after Brexit.

I am also surprised there has been such unquestioning acceptance of the EU's right to insist that the divorce bill must be agreed before negotiations can move onto trade. As a result, the impression I have formed is that if trade were discussed right now, the terms offered could well be so unacceptable that the UK would not want to cough up a Euro cent for the privilege of being able to leave the Union.

iano Oct 17th 2017 10:29 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Shard (Post 12362359)
True, but there's still no reason to inflict significant damage to the economy and marginalise ourselves.

A couple of days ago I saw an EU somebody chastising the US on something. I couldn't help think how much economic/poltical power we in the EU have as a bloc compared to a single nation griping about the US (or China or wherever). This is a different world from 1940's when Britain and France were colonial powers and big players on the international stage. This is what the dewy eyed majors at Brexit Towers don't quite understand.

'Marginalise ourselves'.

Because of the dominant economic argument this appears to have been overlooked in many quarters. It seems absurd to me that while the majority of nations on our continent work in tandem, cooperating and pooling resources in a variety of different fields, as they do now in other continents, we opt to stand alone, and marginalise ourselves.

'Different world'

Back to the economic argument, a lot of UK economic growth in the past 40 or so years has been because of, and not despite EU membership. This reckless punt on a 'global Britain' to replace and enhance what we enjoy currently is fanciful in the extreme. It's a different world.

iano Oct 17th 2017 10:33 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12362803)
I am also surprised there has been such unquestioning acceptance of the EU's right to insist that the divorce bill must be agreed before negotiations can move onto trade..

You mean like the UK government accepted the very same conditions ?

An orderly staged withdrawal makes absolute sense when there's 27 other nations involved.

EMR Oct 17th 2017 10:37 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas (Post 12362803)
Whilst I think the UK government has put itself in a seriously weak position by calling (and almost losing) a General Election, it is surprising that support for Brexit has held up amongst voters, even slighly increasing according to some polls, this despite most voters acknowledging the prospect of being financially worse off after Brexit.

I am also surprised there has been such unquestioning acceptance of the EU's right to insist that the divorce bill must be agreed before negotiations can move onto trade. As a result, the impression I have formed is that if trade were discussed right now, the terms offered could well be so unacceptable that the UK would not want to cough up a Euro cent for the privilege of being able to leave the Union.

You should read the latest polls in the Sunday Times.
It contradicts your claim about brexit support increasing.


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