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International schools?

International schools?

Old May 9th 2006, 5:15 am
  #16  
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Default Re: International schools?

Originally Posted by Costa-Convert
Personally I am paying for my son's education because I want to give him a good start. I pay for his education in the UK. He is not going to an all English school anyway his school is an international bi-lingual, which ultimately studies for the baccalaureate.
I hope you don't mind my sticking my nose in this discussion? Isn't the baccalaureate you've referred to the international baccalaureate? If so, then this curriculum is not offered in many schools (UK or Spain), I believe, only a few private ones (fee paying).
I don't wish to enter in a discussion over which is a better curriculum (don't know enough facts).
Most parents send their child to a school in the hope their child will flourish and do well. And, the nurturing of the child continues both at home and at school. As parents, we know this and try our best. There are no prizes. Yet the certificate/diploma with which the child leaves the school may/may not help to open other doors to further education. Perhaps this is a reason why some parents choose the private sector?
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Old May 9th 2006, 6:24 am
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Default Re: International schools?

Originally Posted by Carol&John
I hope you don't mind my sticking my nose in this discussion? Isn't the baccalaureate you've referred to the international baccalaureate? If so, then this curriculum is not offered in many schools (UK or Spain), I believe, only a few private ones (fee paying).
I don't wish to enter in a discussion over which is a better curriculum (don't know enough facts).
Most parents send their child to a school in the hope their child will flourish and do well. And, the nurturing of the child continues both at home and at school. As parents, we know this and try our best. There are no prizes. Yet the certificate/diploma with which the child leaves the school may/may not help to open other doors to further education. Perhaps this is a reason why some parents choose the private sector?

My reasons for choosing the private sector are because of sheer disappointment with the public sector in the UK. I am a second time around mum and my children from my first marriage all went to state schools. The youngest of those children is now 17 and has been diagnosed with a type of autism and severe learning difficulties. He can barely read and write and now attends a special school which is funded by the local LEA.
Great I hear you say!!! Unfortunately his needs were not recognised early enough and he has suffered because of the situation. He was diagnosed with a condition called sensory integration at the age of 5 and because the school knew nothing about it, he was labelled a disruptive bully, when he got to 10 and could still not read the educational physiologist's were called in, they said he was lazy. His special needs helper said he was lazy. He did not do the work because he could not do it, but he was fighting having to admit he could not do it, unfortunately it came out in the worst way possible.
I have been fighting the Local Education Authority for 12 years and was not prepared to have anyone decide my youngest sons destiny! My son got through school to the age of 15 before anyone decided he should have a statement of special needs I had been asking for him to be assessed since he was 7. My local LEA have actually admitted that my son got lost in the system and his needs were overlooked so now they pay for him to go to a school where he boards 4 nights a week at a cost of £65,000 per year.

So I decided reluctantly because of the cost of it in the UK to send my youngest to private school, I am pleased to say he is doing very well and not showing any of the signs of his brothers disabilities. I struggle sometimes to pay for it over here at £600 per month its not cheap but I was not prepared to let him go through the state system.
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Old May 9th 2006, 9:16 am
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Default Re: International schools?

Hi Costa-Convert,
Phew! What can I say? I am saddened to hear how your son has struggled through his schooling, and I hope he is happy in his new school and making progress with his studies and life skills. I am saddened to hear also how your experience with your LEA was a bad one, and that at least they have admitted to their mistake, albeit very late in the day. I can understand your sense of frustration, anger, fright, despair over the handling of your 17 year old's educational needs. I too have experienced similar proceedings (record of needs) for my 18 year old, but with a much happier ending. Of course, her learning difficulties do not appear as severe as those you mention of your son's, but I'd say that 12 years ago many mild to moderate learning difficulties were unknown to teachers. I was afraid my child might be put in an "institution" (being ignorant at the time of the good work that is being done in special schools), so great was my fear at the time (before I read up more on her condition). We were lucky to have teachers in her (state) primary school who were forward thinking, and proactive. We moved to another area for (state) secondary schooling, and again we were lucky that the special educational needs department was stronge. My wish was (and still is) for her to be happy and independent. I do not wish to pass judgement on a parent with a child struggling through school; it is so individual and complex an issue. A reverse case scenario is of a child with learning difficulties (on the autistic spectrum, very intelligent yet struggling with social skills) whose parents removed him from private school because he could not settle (and possibly his behavour was "disruptive" to the other fee paying pupils? parental pressure?) The child was home educated. However, I digress...
Best wishes for your childrens' education.
Regards,
Carol
P.S. Going back to the original question about a 14 year old and international schooling (not knowing if there are any other circumstances to consider), should the parent investigate/enquire into the leaving qualification? Is the aim to acquire a leaving certificate, GCSE's, a Spanish diploma (don't know the word), or an international baccalaureate? It's maybe time to make this decision?

Last edited by Carol&John; May 9th 2006 at 9:35 am. Reason: typo
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Old May 14th 2006, 9:27 pm
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Default Re: International schools?

Just before we came over (daughter was 11 then) I made an appointment with a certain private school in Alicante, I arrived to find that the "head" had gone out, I was not impressed as I had flew over from the UK for that reason,
we ended putting her in the local Spanish primary school, it was great, there were quite a few english kids there, so helped her to intergrate slowly, (she was taught in spanish, and she had a private lesson at home once a week as well)

Last year we moved inland and she has moved up to secondry school, (spanish) she is the ONLY english kid in the whole school, and is doing really well, ofter getting higher marks in tests/exams than the spanish kids, and her spanish has come on really well,

I do think it depends on the age of the child, if they are primary school age, im sure its easier, daughter would of gone into secondery school if we had stayed in the UK, but here they seem to put them in the year below when you come over

jenny
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Old May 15th 2006, 1:14 am
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Default Re: International schools?

Originally Posted by un-mundo
I'd have thought that around 5 was a very good age to send a child to a Spanish speaking school if you live in Spain. There they would learn to speak Spanish fluently, and at home they'd speak English all the time. Perfect. Bi-lingual, and what an asset that is, these days, job wise and socially.

14, I agree, is a different situation altogether.

I totally agree we are moving to Spain (as soon as house is sold) and we have a 5 year old daughter who has already been to spanish lessons and has a Spanish friend in the UK she will be going to Spanish School as will my baby when she gets older. Apparently they are fluent within a year. What is the point of moving to Spain to put your child in an English school as for grammar I will get relatives to send over the latest books on English etc so they can learn the written language. However I think it must be difficult for teens this is why we have decided to move while our children are still young.

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