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Thanks for all the good advice

Thanks for all the good advice

Old Oct 16th 2004, 1:20 am
  #1  
Bonita or William F. Kale
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Default Thanks for all the good advice

Just want to say thanks for the good advice I got
about driving in England and other stuff before
our first Europe trip ever. We had a ball--even a
flat tire turned into a chance to meet nice
people. We went to Brighton, Salisbury,
Portsmouth, St. Malo and Mont Saint-Michel, York,
Middleton-in-Teesdale and Hadrians Wall, and
London. Overpacked only a little, met lovely
people, saw a lot of stuff (none of which required
standing on line--we skipped anything that did),
and were absolutely flabbergasted by the beauty of
the English countryside. Three weeks passed like
one. I want to go -back-!


Bonita
 
Old Oct 16th 2004, 2:55 am
  #2  
Keith
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Default Re: Thanks for all the good advice

Brighton is a pretty cool place, with the "Palace Pier" and the Royal
Pavilion. Quite a cool little town.

Hardrian's wall was cool too. Where along the wall did you stop? I think
we stopped near hexham, where there was the Roman Army Museum and
Vindolanda. Not far from these museums, probably a mile or two away, we
walked up a steep hill packed with lifestock to the wall. It was windy that
day. Us suburbanites aren't used to being that close to cows, sheep, etc.
We got some nasty looks from some of the animals. Fun times.

Did you go to Salisbury specifically for Salisbury or did you go W
Amesbury(Salisbury plains?) for Stonehenge? I remember spending some time
in Salisbury before and after we took the bus to Stonehenge. Cute town. We
got a bite to eat at this Italian restaurant not far from the bus station.
Good pasta, inexpensive wine. Nice place.

England is such a great place. We've been there several times, and plan to
go back again. I wish there weren't so many other destinations that we have
to see first!

Keith
Pittsburgh

"Bonita or William F. Kale" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Just want to say thanks for the good advice I got
    > about driving in England and other stuff before
    > our first Europe trip ever. We had a ball--even a
    > flat tire turned into a chance to meet nice
    > people. We went to Brighton, Salisbury,
    > Portsmouth, St. Malo and Mont Saint-Michel, York,
    > Middleton-in-Teesdale and Hadrians Wall, and
    > London. Overpacked only a little, met lovely
    > people, saw a lot of stuff (none of which required
    > standing on line--we skipped anything that did),
    > and were absolutely flabbergasted by the beauty of
    > the English countryside. Three weeks passed like
    > one. I want to go -back-!
    > Bonita
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 11:36 pm
  #3  
Dan Stephenson
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Default Re: Thanks for all the good advice

In article <[email protected]>, Bonita or William F. Kale
<[email protected]> wrote:

    > and were absolutely flabbergasted by the beauty of
    > the English countryside. Three weeks passed like
    > one. I want to go -back-!
    >
    >
    > Bonita

I know what you mean. I'm amazed at how beautiful the countryside can
be.

Thing is Bonita, I've had the chance to also visit Wales and Scotland,
and let me assure you that the countryside there is even MORE
beautiful. Hard to believe, I know, but to me, it's true. So if
you're like me and like to take a 'road trip' through the winding
roads, up a cliffside, along a coast, over a mountain or around a loch,
do yourself a big favor and take in Wales and Scotland on your return
to Britain.

--
Dan Stephenson
Photos and movies from US Parks and all over Europe:
http://homepage.mac.com/stepheda
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 12:52 am
  #4  
Mark Hewitt
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Thanks for all the good advice

"Dan Stephenson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:181020040637046908%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Bonita or William F. Kale
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Thing is Bonita, I've had the chance to also visit Wales and Scotland,
    > and let me assure you that the countryside there is even MORE
    > beautiful. Hard to believe, I know, but to me, it's true. So if
    > you're like me and like to take a 'road trip' through the winding
    > roads, up a cliffside, along a coast, over a mountain or around a loch,
    > do yourself a big favor and take in Wales and Scotland on your return
    > to Britain.

Don't forget the Lake District too!
 
Old Oct 24th 2004, 2:52 am
  #5  
Bonita Kale
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Thanks for all the good advice

"Mark Hewitt" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Dan Stephenson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:181020040637046908%[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Bonita or William F. Kale
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > Thing is Bonita, I've had the chance to also visit Wales and Scotland,
    > > and let me assure you that the countryside there is even MORE
    > > beautiful. Hard to believe, I know, but to me, it's true. So if
    > > you're like me and like to take a 'road trip' through the winding
    > > roads, up a cliffside, along a coast, over a mountain or around a loch,
    > > do yourself a big favor and take in Wales and Scotland on your return
    > > to Britain.
    > >
    >
    > Don't forget the Lake District too!


I wish I could see it -all-! We went to Vindolanda and Housesteads on
Hadrian's Wall--my husband walked around Houseteads while I sat on the
wall and watched the scenery gradually and beautifully disappear as
the rain came in. We didn't get to Stonehenge, but we did make
Avebury, which was my Main Attraction in England -- I'm a toucher more
than a looker, and you can -touch- the stones at Avebury. Like
Elizabeth Bennet, we at first hoped to get to the Lakes, but didn't
make it.

Then we came home and added up the cost. Ouch, argh, aieeee.... 20
days, $8,000 including everything (airfare, ferry to France, 3 days'
car rental, new tire, Cadbury bars...). True, the dollar is very low
right now, and in a year or so, we can get senior discounts. I
wouldn't say we'll necessarily -never- go back--but how do people do
it as frequently as some do?

That's not a rhetorical question--any answers? Or does it just always
cost that much?

Bonita
 
Old Oct 24th 2004, 5:10 am
  #6  
Frank F. Matthews
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Thanks for all the good advice

To me that appears a bit on the high end for mid level travel but well
within the reasonable range. Others either pay it or concentrate more
on budget travel. That can include choice of location -- the UK is
moderately expensive. Or selection of housing -- if you stay in one
area housing by the week is often less expensive. Food is also a
malleable item depending on your priorities. Restaurants at lunch &
picnics at night drop the price compared to the reverse.

To me all of these options produce a reduction in the overall quality of
the trip but often to the benefit of more trips. One has to make
choices and sometimes all the choices are reasonable. For your
expenditure two can backpack for many months or stay in reasonable
luxury for a weekend. Someday I may try the latter but I doubt it. I
think my body has aged beyond the former. However I intend to keep
traveling.

Bonita Kale wrote:
snip others
    > I wish I could see it -all-! We went to Vindolanda and Housesteads on
    > Hadrian's Wall--my husband walked around Houseteads while I sat on the
    > wall and watched the scenery gradually and beautifully disappear as
    > the rain came in. We didn't get to Stonehenge, but we did make
    > Avebury, which was my Main Attraction in England -- I'm a toucher more
    > than a looker, and you can -touch- the stones at Avebury. Like
    > Elizabeth Bennet, we at first hoped to get to the Lakes, but didn't
    > make it.
    >
    > Then we came home and added up the cost. Ouch, argh, aieeee.... 20
    > days, $8,000 including everything (airfare, ferry to France, 3 days'
    > car rental, new tire, Cadbury bars...). True, the dollar is very low
    > right now, and in a year or so, we can get senior discounts. I
    > wouldn't say we'll necessarily -never- go back--but how do people do
    > it as frequently as some do?
    >
    > That's not a rhetorical question--any answers? Or does it just always
    > cost that much?
    >
    > Bonita
 

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