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Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

Old Jan 23rd 2007, 3:48 am
  #1  
PJ O'Donovan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

Pub;lished 01/23/2007


Is the Surge Already Producing Results?


"Three interesting things have happened since President Bush announced
plans to "surge" U.S. troops.

First, al Qaida appears to be retreating from Baghdad. A military
intelligence officer has confirmed to Richard Miniter, editor of
Pajamas Media, a report in the Iraqi newspaper al Sabah that Abu Ayyub
al Masri, the head of al Qaida in Iraq, has ordered a withdrawal to
Diyala province, north and east of Baghdad.

Mr. al Masri's evacuation order said that remaining in Baghdad is a
no-win situation for al Qaida, because the Fallujah campaign
demonstrating the Americans have learned how to prevail in house to
house fighting, Mr. Miniter said.

"In more than 10 years of reading al Qaida intercepts, I've never seen
(pessimistic) language like this," he quoted his intelligence officer
source as saying.

Second, the radical cleric Moqtada al Sadr, whose Iranian-subsidized
militia, the Mahdi army, is responsible for most of the assaults on
Sunni civilians in Iraq, is cooling his rhetoric and lowering his
profile.

"Mahdi army militia members have stopped wearing their black uniforms,
hidden their weapons and abandoned their checkpoints in an apparent
effort to lower their profile in Baghdad in advance of the arrival of
U.S. reinforcements," wrote Leila Fadel and Zaineb Obeid of the
McClatchy Newspapers Jan. 13.

Third, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki is putting more distance
between himself and al Sadr, upon whose bloc of votes in parliament he
had relied for political support.

Last Friday al Sadr ordered the 30 lawmakers and six cabinet ministers
he controls to end the boycott of the government he ordered two months
ago. AP writer Steven Hurst described this Monday as "a desperate bid
to fend off an all out American offensive."

Despite this, Mr. Maliki consented to the arrest that same day of Abdul
Hadi al Durraji, al Sadr's media director in Baghdad. Mr. Sadr said
Saturday some 400 of his supporters have been arrested in recent days.

The first development is more of a problem relocated than a problem
solved, because Baghdad's gain from al Qaida's departure will be
Diyala's loss.

A strategic withdrawal makes good sense from al Qaida's point of view.
It's better to live to fight another day. The intelligence officer who
was Mr. Miniter's source thinks Mr. al Masri is a more formidable
opponent than was his predecessor, Abu Musab al Zarqawi who
(ironically) met his end after an encounter with an F-16 in Diyala
province.

But leaving Baghdad gives the government and the Americans the
opportunity to assert control in the contested neighborhoods, which
will make it difficult for al Qaida to return. And because the media
play up events in Baghdad more than events anywhere else in the
country, it means al Qaida will be leaving center stage.

The lowered profile of the Mahdi army will only be a problem postponed
if decisive action isn't taken against al Sadr and his militia.

"Mookie," as the troops call him, can only be relied upon to behave
when he is terrified.

So success hinges on the attitude of the Iraqi government.

Mr. Maliki's turnaround on the Mahdi army "was puzzling because as late
as Oct. 31, he had intervened to end a U.S. blockade of Sadr City, the
northeast Shiite enclave in Baghdad that is headquarters to the
militia," Mr. Hurst wrote.

Two Iraqi government officials told him Mr. Maliki had dropped his
protection of the Mahdi army because U.S. intelligence had persuaded
him it was infiltrated by death squads, the AP reporter wrote.

"Al Maliki realized he couldn't keep defending the Mahdi army because
of the information and evidence that the armed group was taking part in
the killings, displacing people and violating the state's sovereignty,"
Mr. Hurst quoted one of those officials as saying.

But Mr. Maliki would have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to have
recognized from the get go that the Mahdi army is one gigantic death
squad. I suspect Mr. Maliki is only seeing the light now because
President Bush finally is applying some heat.

Mr. Maliki has tried to walk a line between the Scylla of the Americans
and the Charybdis of the Iranians, but the steps he's taking now will
be difficult to retrace.

"He knows that his personal risk increases with each Shiite militia
commander he arrests, and eventually he will pass through a door
through which he cannot return," said the Web logger Tigerhawk.

Though they may turn out to be fleeting, the troop surge, though barely
begun, already is producing beneficial results. Efforts to write it off
in advance as a "failure" are, at best, premature.

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Old Jan 23rd 2007, 4:35 am
  #2  
Dr. Barry Worthington
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

PJ O'Donovan wrote:
> Pub;lished 01/23/2007
>
>
> Is the Surge Already Producing Results?
>
>
> "Three interesting things have happened since President Bush announced
> plans to "surge" U.S. troops.
>
> First, al Qaida appears to be retreating from Baghdad. A military
> intelligence officer has confirmed to Richard Miniter, editor of
> Pajamas Media, a report in the Iraqi newspaper al Sabah that Abu Ayyub
> al Masri, the head of al Qaida in Iraq, has ordered a withdrawal to
> Diyala province, north and east of Baghdad.

Yes. There's a reason for that. The Sunnis in that region are more
interested in organising a defence of their enclaves against marauding
Shia militias. It is the development of a situation akin to a civil war
that has led to a reduction in attacks by them against American troops.
But if the new sweeps of Baghdad Sunni neighbourhods are joint American
and Shia operations, that may spell trouble.

>
> Mr. al Masri's evacuation order said that remaining in Baghdad is a
> no-win situation for al Qaida, because the Fallujah campaign
> demonstrating the Americans have learned how to prevail in house to
> house fighting, Mr. Miniter said.

If he did say that, it's a way of saving face by suggesting they are
switching targets. But Al Quaida adherents have always been marginal to
the Iraq situation....some might say an irrelevance....

>
> "In more than 10 years of reading al Qaida intercepts, I've never seen
> (pessimistic) language like this," he quoted his intelligence officer
> source as saying.

That must predate the American invasion. There weren't any Al Quaida
activists in Iraq then.

> Second, the radical cleric Moqtada al Sadr, whose Iranian-subsidized
> militia, the Mahdi army, is responsible for most of the assaults on
> Sunni civilians in Iraq, is cooling his rhetoric and lowering his
> profile.

Really?

>
> "Mahdi army militia members have stopped wearing their black uniforms,
> hidden their weapons and abandoned their checkpoints in an apparent
> effort to lower their profile in Baghdad in advance of the arrival of
> U.S. reinforcements," wrote Leila Fadel and Zaineb Obeid of the
> McClatchy Newspapers Jan. 13.

They think that the Americans may work with them in eliminating the
Sunnis.....that's why they keep quiet. After all, they effectively
control part of the government, army, and police. (Al Quaida hate
Shias, by the way....)

>
> Third, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki is putting more distance
> between himself and al Sadr, upon whose bloc of votes in parliament he
> had relied for political support.

Because he doesn't want to be associated with a potential cock up....

>
> Last Friday al Sadr ordered the 30 lawmakers and six cabinet ministers
> he controls to end the boycott of the government he ordered two months
> ago. AP writer Steven Hurst described this Monday as "a desperate bid
> to fend off an all out American offensive."

Or a way of directing them against Sunnis....

>
> Despite this, Mr. Maliki consented to the arrest that same day of Abdul
> Hadi al Durraji, al Sadr's media director in Baghdad. Mr. Sadr said
> Saturday some 400 of his supporters have been arrested in recent days.
>
> The first development is more of a problem relocated than a problem
> solved, because Baghdad's gain from al Qaida's departure will be
> Diyala's loss.

What gain?

>
> A strategic withdrawal makes good sense from al Qaida's point of view.
> It's better to live to fight another day. The intelligence officer who
> was Mr. Miniter's source thinks Mr. al Masri is a more formidable
> opponent than was his predecessor, Abu Musab al Zarqawi who
> (ironically) met his end after an encounter with an F-16 in Diyala
> province.

Actually, the real threat is from al Sadr.....

>
> But leaving Baghdad gives the government and the Americans the
> opportunity to assert control in the contested neighborhoods, which
> will make it difficult for al Qaida to return.

And probably entangle the US forces in a civil war.....

>And because the media
> play up events in Baghdad more than events anywhere else in the
> country, it means al Qaida will be leaving center stage.

They never were on the centre stage!

>
> The lowered profile of the Mahdi army will only be a problem postponed
> if decisive action isn't taken against al Sadr and his militia.

Oh? And how will you do that? Some of the Sunni mujihadeen are rumoured
to be offering a 'cease fire' if the Americans will sort out the Mahdi
army. So which side will Uncle Sam end up choosing? Or will it alienate
both?

>
> "Mookie," as the troops call him, can only be relied upon to behave
> when he is terrified.
>
> So success hinges on the attitude of the Iraqi government.

Don't be silly!

>
> Mr. Maliki's turnaround on the Mahdi army "was puzzling because as late
> as Oct. 31, he had intervened to end a U.S. blockade of Sadr City, the
> northeast Shiite enclave in Baghdad that is headquarters to the
> militia," Mr. Hurst wrote.
>
> Two Iraqi government officials told him Mr. Maliki had dropped his
> protection of the Mahdi army because U.S. intelligence had persuaded
> him it was infiltrated by death squads, the AP reporter wrote.

I suspect he knew that. Look, he is trying to position himself for the
moment when Iraq finally falls apart.

>
> "Al Maliki realized he couldn't keep defending the Mahdi army because
> of the information and evidence that the armed group was taking part in
> the killings,

Killing Sunnis.

>displacing people and violating the state's sovereignty,"
> Mr. Hurst quoted one of those officials as saying.
>
> But Mr. Maliki would have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to have
> recognized from the get go that the Mahdi army is one gigantic death
> squad. I suspect Mr. Maliki is only seeing the light now because
> President Bush finally is applying some heat.

Bush!!!!!!

>
> Mr. Maliki has tried to walk a line between the Scylla of the Americans
> and the Charybdis of the Iranians, but the steps he's taking now will
> be difficult to retrace.
>
> "He knows that his personal risk increases with each Shiite militia
> commander he arrests, and eventually he will pass through a door
> through which he cannot return," said the Web logger Tigerhawk.
>
> Though they may turn out to be fleeting, the troop surge, though barely
> begun, already is producing beneficial results.

Is it?


>Efforts to write it off
> in advance as a "failure" are, at best, premature.

I think that it might cause a disaster of epic proprtions. You cannot
be neutral if you plonk yourself in the middle of someone else's
war.....

Dr. Barry Worthington

>
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Old Jan 23rd 2007, 6:07 am
  #3  
PJ O'Donovan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

..<"Iraq suffered its worst attack in two months

Donna Evleth>

Any talk by your hero, Herr HauptStattFuehrer Schwarzenegger, to reduce
the number of his finest or cut police funding in your former home
state in light of the escalating violence in LA?

Is Iraq the only place in the world undergoing the ethnic strife which
was just inevitably waiting to happen or are you obsessed with it only
happening where and when it conveniently feeds your political venom?


Guardian Unlimited

Special report
United States of America

Los Angeles tackles growing gang violence


Dan Glaister in Los Angeles
Tuesday January 23, 2007
The Guardian

Their city once spawned the Crips and the Bloods. Now the authorities
of Los Angeles fear the bad old days of gang warfare are returning, and
some warn of a "race war" between Latino and African-American street
gangs.

A series of shootings in an area south of Los Angeles called Harbor
Gateway has outraged residents and prompted action from city and
federal authorities and community groups. In December, 14-year-old
Cheryl Green was with friends in Harbor Gateway. The African-American
girl was allegedly shot by members of the Latino 204th Street Gang.
Police called it racially motivated becase Cheryl had crossed into an
area the gang claimed as territory.

Article continues
Five days later, nine-year-old Charupha Wongwisetsiri was killed in her
kitchen by a stray bullet from a gang fight in the Angelino Heights
area of the city.

Overall crime rates are falling in the city, but gang-related offences
rose by 14% last year, and by 25% in the city centre.

Last week, the FBI's director, Robert Mueller, joined the city's mayor,
Antonio Villaraigosa, and police chief, William Bratton, to announce a
crackdown on gang violence. The same day community activists announced
that a truce had been agreed between the biggest gangs.

But a 34-year-old African-American man was shot by several Latino men,
say witnesses, on Saturday night in his car in Harbor Gateway. "Los
Angeles, for better or worse, is ground zero for modern gang
activities," Mr Mueller said.

There are an estimated 700 gangs with 40,000 members in Los Angeles,
about four for each police officer.

"It's too big, it's too entrenched," Malcolm Klein, a gang expert at
the University of Southern California, told AP. "You can reduce it. But
the idea you can somehow eliminate it is ridiculous."
 
Old Jan 23rd 2007, 7:33 am
  #4  
Dirk Bruere at NeoPax
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

PJ O'Donovan wrote:
> Pub;lished 01/23/2007
>
>
> Is the Surge Already Producing Results?
>
>
> "Three interesting things have happened since President Bush announced
> plans to "surge" U.S. troops.
>
> First, al Qaida appears to be retreating from Baghdad. A military
> intelligence officer has confirmed to Richard Miniter, editor of
> Pajamas Media, a report in the Iraqi newspaper al Sabah that Abu Ayyub
> al Masri, the head of al Qaida in Iraq, has ordered a withdrawal to
> Diyala province, north and east of Baghdad.

If they are retreating, which I doubt, then it will simply be to
continue the fight elsewhere.

> Mr. al Masri's evacuation order said that remaining in Baghdad is a
> no-win situation for al Qaida, because the Fallujah campaign
> demonstrating the Americans have learned how to prevail in house to
> house fighting, Mr. Miniter said.

Baghdad is not Fallujah.

> "In more than 10 years of reading al Qaida intercepts, I've never seen
> (pessimistic) language like this," he quoted his intelligence officer
> source as saying.

Riiiiiight... is he the guy who told us about all those WMDs Saddam has?

> Second, the radical cleric Moqtada al Sadr, whose Iranian-subsidized
> militia, the Mahdi army, is responsible for most of the assaults on
> Sunni civilians in Iraq, is cooling his rhetoric and lowering his
> profile.

True - he's decided to join the Iraqi government.
[And in case you're wondering, they're the ones who control the 'real'
army, most of whom are Shia anyway]

> "Mahdi army militia members have stopped wearing their black uniforms,
> hidden their weapons and abandoned their checkpoints in an apparent
> effort to lower their profile in Baghdad in advance of the arrival of
> U.S. reinforcements," wrote Leila Fadel and Zaineb Obeid of the
> McClatchy Newspapers Jan. 13.

ie now the US troops won't know who they are.
Shades of Vietnam

> Third, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki is putting more distance
> between himself and al Sadr, upon whose bloc of votes in parliament he
> had relied for political support.

No he isn't - he's just saying that now that Al Sadr is joining him in govt.

> Last Friday al Sadr ordered the 30 lawmakers and six cabinet ministers
> he controls to end the boycott of the government he ordered two months
> ago. AP writer Steven Hurst described this Monday as "a desperate bid
> to fend off an all out American offensive."

By telling the US to leave? and what happens when the "democratically
elected government of Iraq" does that? because if the US pissies off the
Shia that's the result.

> Despite this, Mr. Maliki consented to the arrest that same day of Abdul
> Hadi al Durraji, al Sadr's media director in Baghdad. Mr. Sadr said
> Saturday some 400 of his supporters have been arrested in recent days.

Revolving door.

> The first development is more of a problem relocated than a problem
> solved, because Baghdad's gain from al Qaida's departure will be
> Diyala's loss.

Better send in some more troops.

> A strategic withdrawal makes good sense from al Qaida's point of view.
> It's better to live to fight another day. The intelligence officer who
> was Mr. Miniter's source thinks Mr. al Masri is a more formidable
> opponent than was his predecessor, Abu Musab al Zarqawi who
> (ironically) met his end after an encounter with an F-16 in Diyala
> province.
>
> But leaving Baghdad gives the government and the Americans the
> opportunity to assert control in the contested neighborhoods, which
> will make it difficult for al Qaida to return. And because the media
> play up events in Baghdad more than events anywhere else in the
> country, it means al Qaida will be leaving center stage.

The government (that is, the representatives of the Shia militias) only
want to assert control over the Sunni bits.
>
> The lowered profile of the Mahdi army will only be a problem postponed
> if decisive action isn't taken against al Sadr and his militia.

I look forward to the US version of Stalingrad as they try to fight
their way through the 2 million people of Sadr City.

> "Mookie," as the troops call him, can only be relied upon to behave
> when he is terrified.
>
> So success hinges on the attitude of the Iraqi government.

ie the Shias

> Mr. Maliki's turnaround on the Mahdi army "was puzzling because as late
> as Oct. 31, he had intervened to end a U.S. blockade of Sadr City, the
> northeast Shiite enclave in Baghdad that is headquarters to the
> militia," Mr. Hurst wrote.

Ah... puzzling...

> Two Iraqi government officials told him Mr. Maliki had dropped his
> protection of the Mahdi army because U.S. intelligence had persuaded
> him it was infiltrated by death squads, the AP reporter wrote.

As if he didn't know?

> "Al Maliki realized he couldn't keep defending the Mahdi army because
> of the information and evidence that the armed group was taking part in
> the killings, displacing people and violating the state's sovereignty,"
> Mr. Hurst quoted one of those officials as saying.

Bullshit.

> But Mr. Maliki would have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to have
> recognized from the get go that the Mahdi army is one gigantic death
> squad. I suspect Mr. Maliki is only seeing the light now because
> President Bush finally is applying some heat.

Quite likely.
I expect his lifespan to be pretty short.

> Mr. Maliki has tried to walk a line between the Scylla of the Americans
> and the Charybdis of the Iranians, but the steps he's taking now will
> be difficult to retrace.

Which is closer - Iran or the USA?
Who will still be there in 10 years - Iran or the USA?

> "He knows that his personal risk increases with each Shiite militia
> commander he arrests, and eventually he will pass through a door
> through which he cannot return," said the Web logger Tigerhawk.

True.

> Though they may turn out to be fleeting, the troop surge, though barely
> begun, already is producing beneficial results. Efforts to write it off
> in advance as a "failure" are, at best, premature.

Premature, but not by much.
If the insurgents can hold out (or keep their heads down) until summer
they will win - and they know it.

--
Dirk

http://www.onetribe.me.uk - The UK's only occult talk show
Presented by Dirk Bruere and Marc Power on ResonanceFM 104.4
http://www.resonancefm.com
 
Old Jan 23rd 2007, 7:43 am
  #5  
Runge
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Left Wing Whackos: The "surge" is producing results already

old cretin, you and evleth are both sides of the same coin.

"PJ O'Donovan" <[email protected]> a √©crit dans le message de news:
[email protected] om...
>
> Pub;lished 01/23/2007
>
>
> Is the Surge Already Producing Results?
>
>
> "Three interesting things have happened since President Bush announced
> plans to "surge" U.S. troops.
>
> First, al Qaida appears to be retreating from Baghdad. A military
> intelligence officer has confirmed to Richard Miniter, editor of
> Pajamas Media, a report in the Iraqi newspaper al Sabah that Abu Ayyub
> al Masri, the head of al Qaida in Iraq, has ordered a withdrawal to
> Diyala province, north and east of Baghdad.
>
> Mr. al Masri's evacuation order said that remaining in Baghdad is a
> no-win situation for al Qaida, because the Fallujah campaign
> demonstrating the Americans have learned how to prevail in house to
> house fighting, Mr. Miniter said.
>
> "In more than 10 years of reading al Qaida intercepts, I've never seen
> (pessimistic) language like this," he quoted his intelligence officer
> source as saying.
>
> Second, the radical cleric Moqtada al Sadr, whose Iranian-subsidized
> militia, the Mahdi army, is responsible for most of the assaults on
> Sunni civilians in Iraq, is cooling his rhetoric and lowering his
> profile.
>
> "Mahdi army militia members have stopped wearing their black uniforms,
> hidden their weapons and abandoned their checkpoints in an apparent
> effort to lower their profile in Baghdad in advance of the arrival of
> U.S. reinforcements," wrote Leila Fadel and Zaineb Obeid of the
> McClatchy Newspapers Jan. 13.
>
> Third, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki is putting more distance
> between himself and al Sadr, upon whose bloc of votes in parliament he
> had relied for political support.
>
> Last Friday al Sadr ordered the 30 lawmakers and six cabinet ministers
> he controls to end the boycott of the government he ordered two months
> ago. AP writer Steven Hurst described this Monday as "a desperate bid
> to fend off an all out American offensive."
>
> Despite this, Mr. Maliki consented to the arrest that same day of Abdul
> Hadi al Durraji, al Sadr's media director in Baghdad. Mr. Sadr said
> Saturday some 400 of his supporters have been arrested in recent days.
>
> The first development is more of a problem relocated than a problem
> solved, because Baghdad's gain from al Qaida's departure will be
> Diyala's loss.
>
> A strategic withdrawal makes good sense from al Qaida's point of view.
> It's better to live to fight another day. The intelligence officer who
> was Mr. Miniter's source thinks Mr. al Masri is a more formidable
> opponent than was his predecessor, Abu Musab al Zarqawi who
> (ironically) met his end after an encounter with an F-16 in Diyala
> province.
>
> But leaving Baghdad gives the government and the Americans the
> opportunity to assert control in the contested neighborhoods, which
> will make it difficult for al Qaida to return. And because the media
> play up events in Baghdad more than events anywhere else in the
> country, it means al Qaida will be leaving center stage.
>
> The lowered profile of the Mahdi army will only be a problem postponed
> if decisive action isn't taken against al Sadr and his militia.
>
> "Mookie," as the troops call him, can only be relied upon to behave
> when he is terrified.
>
> So success hinges on the attitude of the Iraqi government.
>
> Mr. Maliki's turnaround on the Mahdi army "was puzzling because as late
> as Oct. 31, he had intervened to end a U.S. blockade of Sadr City, the
> northeast Shiite enclave in Baghdad that is headquarters to the
> militia," Mr. Hurst wrote.
>
> Two Iraqi government officials told him Mr. Maliki had dropped his
> protection of the Mahdi army because U.S. intelligence had persuaded
> him it was infiltrated by death squads, the AP reporter wrote.
>
> "Al Maliki realized he couldn't keep defending the Mahdi army because
> of the information and evidence that the armed group was taking part in
> the killings, displacing people and violating the state's sovereignty,"
> Mr. Hurst quoted one of those officials as saying.
>
> But Mr. Maliki would have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to have
> recognized from the get go that the Mahdi army is one gigantic death
> squad. I suspect Mr. Maliki is only seeing the light now because
> President Bush finally is applying some heat.
>
> Mr. Maliki has tried to walk a line between the Scylla of the Americans
> and the Charybdis of the Iranians, but the steps he's taking now will
> be difficult to retrace.
>
> "He knows that his personal risk increases with each Shiite militia
> commander he arrests, and eventually he will pass through a door
> through which he cannot return," said the Web logger Tigerhawk.
>
> Though they may turn out to be fleeting, the troop surge, though barely
> begun, already is producing beneficial results. Efforts to write it off
> in advance as a "failure" are, at best, premature.
>
> Email Friend | Print | RSS | Add to Del.icio.us | Add to Digg
>
 

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