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January Weather Hottest by Far

January Weather Hottest by Far

Old Feb 15th 2007, 8:12 pm
  #1  
Earl Evleth
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default January Weather Hottest by Far

January Weather Hottest by Far

By SETH BORENSTEIN

AP Science Writer

February 15, 2007, 5:53 PM EST

WASHINGTON --

It may be cold comfort during a frigid February, but last month was by far
the hottest January ever.

The broken record was fueled by a waning El Nino and a gradually warming
world, according to U.S. scientists who reported the data Thursday. Records
on the planet's temperature have been kept since 1880.

Spurred on by unusually warm Siberia, Canada, northern Asia and Europe, the
world's land areas were 3.4 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than a normal January,
according to the U.S. National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. That
didn't just nudge past the old record set in 2002, but broke that mark by
0.81 degrees, which meteorologists said is a lot, since such records often
are broken by hundredths of a degree at a time.

"That's pretty unusual for a record to be broken by that much," said the
data center's scientific services chief, David Easterling. "I was very
surprised."

The scientists went beyond their normal doublechecking and took the unusual
step of running computer climate models "just to make sure that what we're
seeing was real," Easterling said.

It was.

"From one standpoint it is not unusual to have a new record because we've
become accustomed to having records broken," said Jay Lawrimore, climate
monitoring branch chief. But January, he said, was a bigger jump than the
world has seen in about 10 years.

The temperature of the world's land and water combined -- the most effective
measurement -- was 1.53 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal, breaking the
old record by more than one-quarter of a degree. Ocean temperatures alone
didn't set a record.

In the Northern Hemisphere, land areas were 4.1 degrees Fahrenheit warmer
than normal for January, breaking the old record by about three-quarters of
a degree.

But the United States was about normal. The nation was 0.94 degrees
Fahrenheit above normal for January, ranking only the 49th warmest since
1895.

The world's temperature record was driven by northern latitudes. Siberia was
on average 9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal. Eastern Europe had
temperatures averaging 8 degrees Fahrenheit above normal. Canada on average
was more than 5 degrees warmer than normal.

Larger increases in temperature farther north, compared to mid-latitudes, is
"sort of the global warming signal," Easterling said. It is what climate
scientists predict happens and will happen more frequently with global
warming, according to an authoritative report by hundreds of climate
scientists issued this month.

Meteorologists aren't blaming the warmer January on global warming alone,
but they said the higher temperature was consistent with climate change.

Easterling said a weakening El Nino -- a warming of the central Pacific
Ocean that tends to cause changes in weather across the globe -- was a
factor, but not a big one. But Kevin Trenberth, director of climate analysis
at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said El Nino made big
changes worldwide that added up.

Temperature records break regularly with global warming, Trenberth said, but
"with a little bit of El Nino thrown in, you don't just break records, you
smash records."

As much of the United States already knows, February doesn't seem as
unusually warm as January was.

"Even with global warming, you're not going to keep that cold air bottled up
in Alaska and Canada forever," Easterling said.


On the Net

National Climatic Data Center:

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2007/jan/jan07.html

(Corrects to 1895, sted 1894. World temperature records dating to 1880 is
CQ.)

Copyright 2007 Newsday Inc.
 
Old Feb 15th 2007, 10:16 pm
  #2  
Besmet Kalkoen
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: January Weather Hottest by Far

On Feb 16, 10:12 am, Earl Evleth <[email protected]> wrote:
> January Weather Hottest by Far
>
> By SETH BORENSTEIN
>
> AP Science Writer
>
> February 15, 2007, 5:53 PM EST
>
> WASHINGTON --
>
> It may be cold comfort during a frigid February, but last month was by far
> the hottest January ever.
>
> The broken record was fueled by a waning El Nino and a gradually warming
> world, according to U.S. scientists who reported the data Thursday. Records
> on the planet's temperature have been kept since 1880.
>
> Spurred on by unusually warm Siberia, Canada, northern Asia and Europe, the
> world's land areas were 3.4 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than a normal January,
> according to the U.S. National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. That
> didn't just nudge past the old record set in 2002, but broke that mark by
> 0.81 degrees, which meteorologists said is a lot, since such records often
> are broken by hundredths of a degree at a time.
>
> "That's pretty unusual for a record to be broken by that much," said the
> data center's scientific services chief, David Easterling. "I was very
> surprised."
>
> The scientists went beyond their normal doublechecking and took the unusual
> step of running computer climate models "just to make sure that what we're
> seeing was real," Easterling said.
>
> It was.
>
> "From one standpoint it is not unusual to have a new record because we've
> become accustomed to having records broken," said Jay Lawrimore, climate
> monitoring branch chief. But January, he said, was a bigger jump than the
> world has seen in about 10 years.
>
> The temperature of the world's land and water combined -- the most effective
> measurement -- was 1.53 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal, breaking the
> old record by more than one-quarter of a degree. Ocean temperatures alone
> didn't set a record.
>
> In the Northern Hemisphere, land areas were 4.1 degrees Fahrenheit warmer
> than normal for January, breaking the old record by about three-quarters of
> a degree.
>
> But the United States was about normal. The nation was 0.94 degrees
> Fahrenheit above normal for January, ranking only the 49th warmest since
> 1895.
>
> The world's temperature record was driven by northern latitudes. Siberia was
> on average 9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal. Eastern Europe had
> temperatures averaging 8 degrees Fahrenheit above normal. Canada on average
> was more than 5 degrees warmer than normal.
>
> Larger increases in temperature farther north, compared to mid-latitudes, is
> "sort of the global warming signal," Easterling said. It is what climate
> scientists predict happens and will happen more frequently with global
> warming, according to an authoritative report by hundreds of climate
> scientists issued this month.
>
> Meteorologists aren't blaming the warmer January on global warming alone,
> but they said the higher temperature was consistent with climate change.
>
> Easterling said a weakening El Nino -- a warming of the central Pacific
> Ocean that tends to cause changes in weather across the globe -- was a
> factor, but not a big one. But Kevin Trenberth, director of climate analysis
> at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said El Nino made big
> changes worldwide that added up.
>
> Temperature records break regularly with global warming, Trenberth said, but
> "with a little bit of El Nino thrown in, you don't just break records, you
> smash records."
>
> As much of the United States already knows, February doesn't seem as
> unusually warm as January was.
>
> "Even with global warming, you're not going to keep that cold air bottled up
> in Alaska and Canada forever," Easterling said.
>
> On the Net
>
> National Climatic Data Center:
>
> http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2007/jan/jan07.html
>
> (Corrects to 1895, sted 1894. World temperature records dating to 1880 is
> CQ.)
>
> Copyright 2007 Newsday Inc.

http://www.flandersnews.be/cm/flandersnews.be/News/070216_thick_jumpers

Heating down! Sweaters on!
Fri 16/02/07 - Friday is "Slip on Your Sweater Day" in Flanders.
Hundreds of schools, companies and public sector offices, across the
region have turned down their heating and asked their pupils or staff
to wear a thick jumper.
The idea behind "Slip on Your Sweater Day" is to focus attention on
the dangers posed by global warming.

Central heating systems across the land have been turned down and
consequently energy consumption is expected to be lower than average.
(PhotoNews)
Last year, there was a reduction of 156 tonnes in the amount of carbon
emitted by Flemish schools.

It's no coincidence that "Slip on Your Sweater Day" falls on 16
February. It is exactly two years to the day since the Kyoto Protocol
came into force.

The Kyoto Protocol is an agreement made under the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Countries that have ratified the protocol commit themselves to
reducing their greenhouse gas emission or to engage in emissions
exchange, if they maintain or increase emissions of such gases.

Schools were the main, if not the only, participants in the first two
"Slip on Your Sweater Days".

This year the Flemish Environment Ministry is also encouraging
companies and public service institutions like the VRT to participate.
Read more about "Slip on Your Sweater Day"
 
Old Feb 16th 2007, 6:44 am
  #3  
Runge
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: The old cretin spams

"Earl Evleth" <[email protected]> a √©crit dans le message de news:
C1FB3411.D13DD%[email protected]...
>
> January Weather Hottest by Far
>
> By SETH BORENSTEIN
>
> AP Science Writer
>
> February 15, 2007, 5:53 PM EST
>
> WASHINGTON --
>
> It may be cold comfort during a frigid February, but last month was by far
> the hottest January ever.
>
> The broken record was fueled by a waning El Nino and a gradually warming
> world, according to U.S. scientists who reported the data Thursday.
> Records
> on the planet's temperature have been kept since 1880.
>
> Spurred on by unusually warm Siberia, Canada, northern Asia and Europe,
> the
> world's land areas were 3.4 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than a normal
> January,
> according to the U.S. National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C.
> That
> didn't just nudge past the old record set in 2002, but broke that mark by
> 0.81 degrees, which meteorologists said is a lot, since such records often
> are broken by hundredths of a degree at a time.
>
> "That's pretty unusual for a record to be broken by that much," said the
> data center's scientific services chief, David Easterling. "I was very
> surprised."
>
> The scientists went beyond their normal doublechecking and took the
> unusual
> step of running computer climate models "just to make sure that what we're
> seeing was real," Easterling said.
>
> It was.
>
> "From one standpoint it is not unusual to have a new record because we've
> become accustomed to having records broken," said Jay Lawrimore, climate
> monitoring branch chief. But January, he said, was a bigger jump than the
> world has seen in about 10 years.
>
> The temperature of the world's land and water combined -- the most
> effective
> measurement -- was 1.53 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal, breaking
> the
> old record by more than one-quarter of a degree. Ocean temperatures alone
> didn't set a record.
>
> In the Northern Hemisphere, land areas were 4.1 degrees Fahrenheit warmer
> than normal for January, breaking the old record by about three-quarters
> of
> a degree.
>
> But the United States was about normal. The nation was 0.94 degrees
> Fahrenheit above normal for January, ranking only the 49th warmest since
> 1895.
>
> The world's temperature record was driven by northern latitudes. Siberia
> was
> on average 9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal. Eastern Europe had
> temperatures averaging 8 degrees Fahrenheit above normal. Canada on
> average
> was more than 5 degrees warmer than normal.
>
> Larger increases in temperature farther north, compared to mid-latitudes,
> is
> "sort of the global warming signal," Easterling said. It is what climate
> scientists predict happens and will happen more frequently with global
> warming, according to an authoritative report by hundreds of climate
> scientists issued this month.
>
> Meteorologists aren't blaming the warmer January on global warming alone,
> but they said the higher temperature was consistent with climate change.
>
> Easterling said a weakening El Nino -- a warming of the central Pacific
> Ocean that tends to cause changes in weather across the globe -- was a
> factor, but not a big one. But Kevin Trenberth, director of climate
> analysis
> at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said El Nino made big
> changes worldwide that added up.
>
> Temperature records break regularly with global warming, Trenberth said,
> but
> "with a little bit of El Nino thrown in, you don't just break records, you
> smash records."
>
> As much of the United States already knows, February doesn't seem as
> unusually warm as January was.
>
> "Even with global warming, you're not going to keep that cold air bottled
> up
> in Alaska and Canada forever," Easterling said.
>
>
> On the Net
>
> National Climatic Data Center:
>
> http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2007/jan/jan07.html
>
> (Corrects to 1895, sted 1894. World temperature records dating to 1880 is
> CQ.)
>
> Copyright 2007 Newsday Inc.
>
>
 

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