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A Food thread

A Food thread

Old Nov 30th 2019, 9:56 pm
  #466  
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Default Re: A Food thread


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Old Nov 30th 2019, 11:19 pm
  #467  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by Expatrick View Post
Hungarian in your DNA, maybe...
Tonight you would be right; I have gulyas with the little dumplings, lovingly prepared by my girlfriends in the kitchen at the Balaton Club.


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Old Dec 1st 2019, 6:59 am
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Smile Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by johnwoo View Post

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A lot of british goodies there Johnwoo
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Old Dec 7th 2019, 5:02 pm
  #469  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
That's the down side to living in Canada. Mature cheddar - as opposed to 'old' cheddar in the slabs - is expensive. As an example, last week I bought 200g for $8 that in Sainsburys was the equivalent of $1.70. If I'm lucky, I can buy 400g of passable 'old' cheese for $5. That's what I'll use for sauces or cheese on toast. The $8 for 200g (and that was an offer) stuff is for when I want to savour it as cheese.

I made a very nice sauce with Gruyère once.
Horses for courses I've decided. If the cheese sauce turns out too greasy then it's either (a) the wrong sort of cheese for a sauce or (b) a not aged enough portion of the right sort of cheese. One only needs to do a side by side test with a proper Swiss Moitié-Moitié and a French fondue Savoyarde. The cheapskate French one will be swimming in grease.

Good Gruyère does make a very nice sauce.

I do take your point that when splashing the cash for decent mature cheese, it's best eaten as is rather than used in a sauce. Next steps for me are to try some locally produced "well 'ard" cheeses for cooking and also look at some simple cold room and cloth techniques for better ageing the young'uns.

Anyway, that was last week: this week I've gone nuts. We're hosting the family Christmas bash again this year, which means that I get veggie duties rather than main course , but I always like to add a vegetarian option alongside the main. I haven't done a 'proper' nut roast for a while, so have been looking at more ideas.

Found some good variations concerning nut roast en croûte, sometimes known as nut roast Wellington, this being one of the more pathetic French attempts at cockney rhyming slang:

Spoiler:
en croûte = Wellington boot.

Then I decided to read up a bit and found the Maillard reaction.

Planning a tester tomorrow with OH as guinea-pig, the kitchen smells pretty good just now, partially pre-roasting brazils, walnuts and hazlenuts.
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Old Dec 7th 2019, 5:26 pm
  #470  
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Default Re: A Food thread

One of my sisters has made some nice looking tourtieres:

I've never tried, but when I do I have the old Wand family recipe from Montreal to use.
This Recipe makes 3 pies
>
> 2lbs lean ground pork or ground veal (very good with one lb. of each)
> 2lbs of lean ground beef
> 1 small shopped onion
> 2 stalks chopped celery
> 1 clove chopped garlic
> 1 dash salt
> 1 dash pepper
>
> 1 (10.75 oz.) can consomme
> 1/2 - 3/4 tsp. cinnamon
> 1/4 tsp. cloves
> 1 pinch savory
>
> Place meat, onion, celery, garlic, salt & pepper in saucepan, cook until meat is granular
>
> Put into dutch oven and fill pot 1/2 -2/3 full of water and add 1 can of consomme
>
>
> Cook for 1 hour.
>
> When done, remove from heat and mix in 1/2 - 3/4 tsp. cinnamon, 1/4 tsp. clove, pinch of savory.
>
> Put meat into pie crusts. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes or until crust is deep golden brown.
>
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Old Dec 7th 2019, 5:28 pm
  #471  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BuckinghamshireBoy View Post
Horses for courses I've decided. If the cheese sauce turns out too greasy then it's either (a) the wrong sort of cheese for a sauce or (b) a not aged enough portion of the right sort of cheese. One only needs to do a side by side test with a proper Swiss Moitié-Moitié and a French fondue Savoyarde. The cheapskate French one will be swimming in grease.

Good Gruyère does make a very nice sauce.

I do take your point that when splashing the cash for decent mature cheese, it's best eaten as is rather than used in a sauce. Next steps for me are to try some locally produced "well 'ard" cheeses for cooking and also look at some simple cold room and cloth techniques for better ageing the young'uns.

Anyway, that was last week: this week I've gone nuts. We're hosting the family Christmas bash again this year, which means that I get veggie duties rather than main course , but I always like to add a vegetarian option alongside the main. I haven't done a 'proper' nut roast for a while, so have been looking at more ideas.

Found some good variations concerning nut roast en croûte, sometimes known as nut roast Wellington, this being one of the more pathetic French attempts at cockney rhyming slang:

Spoiler:
en croûte = Wellington boot.

Then I decided to read up a bit and found the Maillard reaction.

Planning a tester tomorrow with OH as guinea-pig, the kitchen smells pretty good just now, partially pre-roasting brazils, walnuts and hazlenuts.
When adding powders be they baking soda, flour etc etc make sure you cook them out well enough otherwise things can taste downright off gritty etc...

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Old Dec 7th 2019, 6:24 pm
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by Chatter Static View Post
When adding powders be they baking soda, flour etc etc make sure you cook them out well enough otherwise things can taste downright off gritty etc...
Was looking at that aspect only yesterday, seems when using baking powders and similar, it's best to soak/marinade the meat for just a few minutes, then rinse and pat dry before continuing.

Late edit: usage of baking powder here as a meat tenderiser...

Last edited by BuckinghamshireBoy; Dec 7th 2019 at 6:31 pm.
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Old Dec 7th 2019, 6:39 pm
  #473  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by caretaker View Post
One of my sisters has made some nice looking tourtieres: <snip>
Good stuff, I make something similar every couple of weeks or so, but probably with a higher veg to meat ratio.

Leek über alles.
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Old Dec 7th 2019, 6:52 pm
  #474  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BuckinghamshireBoy View Post
Was looking at that aspect only yesterday, seems when using baking powders and similar, it's best to soak/marinade the meat for just a few minutes, then rinse and pat dry before continuing.

Late edit: usage of baking powder here as a meat tenderiser...
Meat is also best cooked from room temp not fridge temp oil the meat not the pan and let the pan get hot first avoid pepper in the initial cooking and browning phase as the pepper will just burn and taste bitter excessive salt draws moisture out.

Im a great fan of Sous Vide machines and smokers a lot can be learnt about cooking by taking a more scientific approach to a meal. Owning and using a good digital thermometer can make all the difference when cooking meat.

Last edited by Chatter Static; Dec 7th 2019 at 6:55 pm.
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Old Dec 7th 2019, 11:33 pm
  #475  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by Chatter Static View Post
Meat is also best cooked from room temp not fridge...
I've read as many chefs say the opposite.

It reminded me of this https://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/...ing-steak.html

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Old Dec 8th 2019, 11:19 am
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
I've read as many chefs say the opposite.

It reminded me of this https://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/...ing-steak.html
That article says defrosting a steak in a frying pan speeds up defrosting, your really not going to get a quality steak from the freezer I am

That aside the reason for not cooking from the fridge is because to get the centre up to the cooked temp the outside is overcooked which is obviously why the Sous Vide method works better because you set the done temp and let the steak cook you can brown the steak before or after. You can't leave the meat in the sous vide machine too long or it will turn to mush.

The Serious Eat's approach to poached egg's is great, poach the egg's in their shells takes longer but the yolk's are creamier it also makes knocking up batches of egg's Benedict easy at christmas.

Last edited by Chatter Static; Dec 8th 2019 at 11:21 am.
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Old Dec 8th 2019, 3:05 pm
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
I've read as many chefs say the opposite.

It reminded me of this https://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/...ing-steak.html
Originally Posted by Chatter Static View Post
That article says defrosting a steak in a frying pan speeds up defrosting, your really not going to get a quality steak from the freezer I am

That aside the reason for not cooking from the fridge is because to get the centre up to the cooked temp the outside is overcooked which is obviously why the Sous Vide method works better because you set the done temp and let the steak cook you can brown the steak before or after. You can't leave the meat in the sous vide machine too long or it will turn to mush.

The Serious Eat's approach to poached egg's is great, poach the egg's in their shells takes longer but the yolk's are creamier it also makes knocking up batches of egg's Benedict easy at christmas.
I'm with Cs on this one, I always bring meat to room temperature before cooking.

Another thing is that I never cook a steak on a barbie; the loss of control can potentially ruin a perfect cut of meat. Luckily here everyone in the family likes their meat bleu or saignante.

A few years ago someone bought my brother-in-law a Christmas present that purported to cook eggs perfectly in their shells in a microwave oven.

The following morning there were a few loud bangs, a torrent of bad language and a call from the kitchen of "Anyone for eggs Al-Qaeda?"
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Old Dec 8th 2019, 3:33 pm
  #478  
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Default Re: A Food thread

There is no doubt that defrosting a steak in a frying pan speeds up defrosting. Anything that conducts cold away from the meat will aid that process. I'm taking frozen chicken wings out now, and when they've thawed enough to separate I'll put them in a steel bowl with a plate on top so they'll defrost faster. Everyone can cook their steaks however they like at whatever temperature (med-rare for me, thank you). When I hitch-hiked back to the home town to visit for a few days when I was 16, I stayed in the bootlegger's shack in the back room. He asked if I'd like steak for supper, and I said certainly. We went out to the attached shed and I helped him take down a hanging frozen quarter of a moose and we ran it through the band saw twice for 2 good chops. He threw them into the frying pan still frozen, and it was great, tender and juicy. I tried to do that a couple of times with 0 success, and I don't know how he did it. Now I want a steak.
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Old Dec 8th 2019, 3:59 pm
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BuckinghamshireBoy View Post
I'm with Cs on this one, I always bring meat to room temperature before cooking.

Another thing is that I never cook a steak on a barbie; the loss of control can potentially ruin a perfect cut of meat. Luckily here everyone in the family likes their meat bleu or saignante.

A few years ago someone bought my brother-in-law a Christmas present that purported to cook eggs perfectly in their shells in a microwave oven.

The following morning there were a few loud bangs, a torrent of bad language and a call from the kitchen of "Anyone for eggs Al-Qaeda?"
I sous vide then final sear with the barbie or a blow torch.....

I also bung a two rib prime rib in the smoker at about 8.30 am and smoke it until it hits 45c then vacuum seal it with a selection of odd's and sods and stick it in the sous vide machine for the rest of the day, come dinner time pop a salad on the table and then the meat can be removed dried off and seared on a extremely hot grill quickly.

Then lock yourself in a room away from your family and eat it all........ Salad is for the wimps on the other side of the locked door...
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Old Dec 8th 2019, 10:03 pm
  #480  
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Default Re: A Food thread

Originally Posted by BuckinghamshireBoy View Post
I'm with Cs on this one, I always bring meat to room temperature before cooking.

Another thing is that I never cook a steak on a barbie; the loss of control can potentially ruin a perfect cut of meat. Luckily here everyone in the family likes their meat bleu or saignante.
Get a good thermometer.



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