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British Terminology

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Old Oct 1st 2017, 6:00 pm
  #106  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
That reminds me of another American/British difference, this one in the woodwind section of the orchestra.

American - English horn
British - Cor anglais

According to the article in Wikipedia, the cor anglais was developed in Silesia around 1720. It has nothing to do with England! Supposedly, it looks like the instruments held by angels in medieval paintings, so was called "angelic horn" in German. This gradually became English/anglais in other languages.
Talking of things musical, there was a 1950s American film titled "Young Man with a Horn" which was discreetly re-titled "Young Man of Music" for its UK release.
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 8:22 pm
  #107  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by GeniB View Post
You'd have a hard time eating those then

where on earth did they get that name from?
Supposedly it's an initialism. Dunlop Athletic Plimsole.
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 9:41 pm
  #108  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Supposedly it's an initialism. Dunlop Athletic Plimsole.
A number of my pals complained that they'd been 'dapped' in school, but cannot recall any saying they'd been dunlop athletic plimsoled......
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 10:40 pm
  #109  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Tweedpipe View Post
A number of my pals complained that they'd been 'dapped' in school, but cannot recall any saying they'd been dunlop athletic plimsoled......
TBH, that's the beauty of initialisms.
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Old Oct 1st 2017, 10:43 pm
  #110  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Supposedly it's an initialism. Dunlop Athletic Plimsole.
I never knew that. I liked Dunlop Green Flash. They were the bees knees.



Dap whitener. Do they still do stuff like that?
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 7:17 am
  #111  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
I never knew that. I liked Dunlop Green Flash. They were the bees knees.

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNj...JT3xXY/$_1.JPG

Dap whitener. Do they still do stuff like that?
Called 'Sports Whitener' now

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&...l_4rfjv61cpe_e
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 7:56 am
  #112  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
I remember an artic truck driver from Yorkshire delivered a load one day to the warehouse in Gloucester where I used to work. I was unloading his trailer and he wandered into the warehouse to find out out much longer I was going to be before he could leave. He greeted me with a big grin a friendly "How's it going, love?" Coming from Sheffield myself it wasn't concerning to me, but I suspect that my colleagues in the warehouse might have been taken-a-back.
I remember when the buses belonged to SYT then Mainline. All the drivers called everyone love (luv) and passengers used to thank them when they alighted.

I can also remember a sign on all buses asking children to give up seats to older people at busy times.
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 8:00 am
  #113  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by GeniB View Post
If we are talking bread buns? They are called 'Baps' in Lancashire. Or 'oven bottoms' if they are flat ones
They're called breadcakes
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 2:19 pm
  #114  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Supposedly it's an initialism. Dunlop Athletic Plimsole.
Except... no. Dunlop didn't acquire the Liverpool Rubber Company (who made Plimsolls) until a couple of years after the first cited references to "daps" in the OED.

Daps is more likely to be derived from "dapper" meaning smart.
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 3:20 pm
  #115  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Oakvillian View Post
Except... no. Dunlop didn't acquire the Liverpool Rubber Company (who made Plimsolls) until a couple of years after the first cited references to "daps" in the OED.

Daps is more likely to be derived from "dapper" meaning smart.
I know. That's why I wrote "supposedly." A lot of etymologies involving initialisms are bs. For instance, "posh" is derived from "port out, starboard home." A likely story.
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 5:07 pm
  #116  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
I know. That's why I wrote "supposedly." A lot of etymologies involving initialisms are bs. For instance, "posh" is derived from "port out, starboard home." A likely story.
That is the problem, and indeed the beauty, of a vulgar (arch) language like English, that new words and usages come from verbal usage by the masses, eventually reaching a critical mass where they become written down. Unfortunately by then their true etymological genesis may be years earlier and lost in the mists of time, and their true roots become supplanted by some guess-work and personal bias of an etymologist, to be preserved for the generations, no matter that it is twaddle.
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 5:43 pm
  #117  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
That is the problem, and indeed the beauty, of a vulgar (arch) language like English, that new words and usages come from verbal usage by the masses, eventually reaching a critical mass where they become written down. Unfortunately by then their true etymological genesis may be years earlier and lost in the mists of time, and their true roots become supplanted by some guess-work and personal bias of an etymologist, to be preserved for the generations, no matter that it is twaddle.
twaddle (n.)
"silly talk, prosy nonsense," 1782, probably from twattle (1550s), of obscure origin.
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 8:27 pm
  #118  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
I know. That's why I wrote "supposedly." A lot of etymologies involving initialisms are bs. For instance, "posh" is derived from "port out, starboard home." A likely story.
Any alternative etymology ?
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 9:59 pm
  #119  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Shard View Post
Any alternative etymology ?
This is what Snopes has to say about the etymology of "posh":
.... Finally there’s what’s known about the word’s history. As mentioned earlier, posh has a murky beginning. The word, as we now understand it to mean “luxurious” (it’s carried a number of meanings during its time in the English language), was first sighted in print in 1914. However, if we look back at a related meaning, that of “a dandy,” it was sighted in 1890, with that entry drawn from a dictionary of slang, from which we can glean that the word had been around for a bit even before that.

As to where posh (in the “dandy” sense) came from, in 1830 the word was sighted in print as a term for money (“He had not got the posh yet”). A reasonable assumption is that, over time, a slang term for “money” came to mean “someone who has a fair bit of money,” which then jumped to mean “something that costs a lot of money” or “something that only the highest socially can get their hands on.”

As to how posh came to mean “money,” a term from the Romany language spoken by the gypsies in 17th century England brought it into play: posh-houri, meaning “half-pence.” The posh component of that compound word stuck around, attracting the slang meaning of money. .....

Last edited by Pulaski; Oct 2nd 2017 at 10:07 pm.
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Old Oct 2nd 2017, 10:02 pm
  #120  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Shard View Post
Any alternative etymology ?
posh-houri, from Romany came to mean money, is another tale I have read.
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