Re: Refuse $100 note

Old May 15th 2003, 8:13 pm
  #1  
Tarapia Tapioco
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Refuse $100 note

That's right. Credit cards were invented with one purpose in mind - to
beef up commerce by luring people to take debt; security was NOT a
concern. Almost all credit cards can be used to, for example, purchase
stuff ON-LINE or by phone with only information shown on the cards -
this renders your photos useless but greatly facilitates the beef-up of
capitalism. Also, almost all credit cards users, especially the ones
who love credit cards or depend on credit cards, have no idea how much
interest credit cards bear - usually close to 20% per annum. Not a
usury since it is permitted by laws but average people wouldn't borrow
at 20% interest rate per annum if they know the figure. It doesn't take
a banker to know the evils of credit cards. Many people are just
ignorant to let credit card operators walk all over themselves. Stay
away from credit cards or anything bearing a "credit" lingo. Getting
"credit things" is a free ticket to "mounting debt". Never borrow money
to spend. This is a must-remember for immigrants. Canada, according to
statistics, is not much better than US in debits, both public and
private.

The best cash-less payment method is debit cards/bank cards. When using
bank cards on Interac, one should use them on trusted stores and cover
tightly when punching your pin numbers so the cameras behind you can't
read your finger movements. Still the best way to pay is cash unless
it's a payment of $2,000 or more. If carried-in $100 bills by landed
immigrants are not accepted, just convert them to $20 bills at any bank
outlets, or simply deposit them in your bank ATMS and withdraw cash
afterwards. There is no reason to use $100 bills around. The first
thing landed immigrants do is to have a domicile and put all the
settlement funds in a bank account and get a bank card. Do not purchase
big ticket items in a haste, including cars. There are lots of scams
around in Canada designed for ignorant immigrants - some even by early
landed immigrants. Landed immigrants especially get cheated easily by
earlier landed immigrants from the same country or region on false
trust. Allow yourself a minimum of six months to get used to your
surroundings by making intense contacts with community and reading
local papers. There are scams or even frauds on almost all big-ticket
purchases. There was even a case in which seller/agent/lawyer (all
locals) cooperate to cheat home-purchasing immigrants on an already
sold house.

One of the common behavioral models among immigrants, Asian especially
for their cultural weakness, is that immigrants always intuitively
submit to scams, frauds or straight bullying by locals. Even when
immigrants realize they are victims of scams/frauds/bullying/racial
violence, they seldom stand up to fight back for various reasons: 1)
the legal/police systems always stand in favour of local Caucasians, 2)
Many immigrants come from countries colonised by Britts using brute
force; hence the intuitive submission to avoid being killed by
Caucasians; Canada resembles those colonies in appearance and in
substance mostly. This phenomenon is most apparent among Indians,
Chinese, and Arabs, who are painted by White supremacist as dirty,
filthy, dishonest, coward, and even scums, even they bring in lots of
money to support the welfare systems many locals live on.

Most locals are under-educated and can't write properly while most
skilled immigrants from Asia, Europe or Africa (few because Canada
doesn't take African immigrants easily even as refugees). There is no
need for skilled immigrants to live in the colonial past. For instance,
many local cashiers have problems with numbers. Therefore whenever one
does transaction, one should double check the amount. Stop intuitively
thinking they are superior to you because they are not. When bullied,
always fight back immediately because they are used to bullying
immigrants and getting away laughing aloud. When racists tell you to go
back, tell them to go back to England because they are illegal
immigrants forcing their way in by killing first nations people. When
racists apply violence on you, run away as fast as possible because if
you get injured or killed, police most likely wouldn't bother stand by
you. Many locals are drug addicts. Pot industry is a big deal in
Canada. That's why smoking/possessing pot is soon to be decriminalized.
Beware if you want to rent out the basement, apartment or a whole
house, check in frequently if your local tenants are contributing to
the pot industry!

Another thing immigrants should beware, in addition to
scams/frauds/credit card abuse, is that in Canada you should NOT give
ANY personal information to any one UNLESS it is required by LAWS. The
most popular scams to harvest personal information for mailing list or
plain frauds are 1) prize drawing, 2) contests, 3) random phone
marketing, and 4) store membership. Generally speaking, only certain
government agencies, e.g., Canada tax, can LEGALLY ask for personal
information and certain related laws permitting such acts are quoted on
the documents. You can even refuse to provide personal information in
all regards to governments since they already have your personal
information in Immigration, CCRA, MSP, RCMP, CSIS, etc. repeatedly.
There is really no reason for ANY governmental units, e.g., Census or
Statistics, to ask you for the same or extra personal information
beyond what privacy acts permit. In most countries, personal
information is abusive automatically unless specifically banned. In
Canada, it's the opposite - personal information is guarded unless the
person(s) agrees it can be abused.

Beware, dont give any information on phone or in person verbally to ANY
parties, including governmental agencies. Dont even tell any stranger
callers what your phone number or name is. In North America, it's very
common to have junk-callers buzzing randomly to harvest personal
information. In Canada, people who ring your phone dont identify
themselves or even start asking your name/phone number/etc. are
conducting illegal practices such as scams or frauds. Everything,
especially governmental requests, should be in writings. Canada has a
long nasty history of seeing personal information abused by even
governments to conduct illegitimate acts. That's why we have privacy
acts and privacy commissioners to more or less stand by people against
abusive governments. That's why the passing of C-36 by taking advantage
of "scares" was so shockingly significant, which just legitimized tons
of definitely, not potentially, abusive acts governments can conduct on
Canadian people. Unlike Americans, Canadians in general dont consider
"big brother" is a way of or part of life. This is a drastic difference
from where most immigrants come from in Europe, Africa or Asia.
Normally all you need to give for any governmental units to identify
you is your name and your name only, as you would do when stopped by
Police since they can always look up your name in their database.
Remember the rights you have in silence. Anything you say can be used
to charge against you or even abuse you. You may feel pressed to say
things intuitively as you did in your pre-landed country/territory. But
that would only invite troubles even though they, both public or
private parties, would make you feel pressed or obliged to give them
your personal information by taking advantage of your ignorance of
Canadian regulations.

If governments can abuse people on their disclosed personal
information, average Joe can certainly walk all over on you based on
your personal information, legally if you give them permissions. That's
why most scams designed to collect your personal information use baits
to lure you and have fine prints stating that you agree to give up your
rights for personal information privacy and they are allowed by you to
sell your personal information to anyone for any purpose. Lots of
scams, mostly based in the US, use the personal information you
ignorantly give out to inform you that you have won certain contests
(e.g., an SUV) and you must pay "commitment fees" up-front via your
"credit cards"! Landed immigrants, desperate for earning money, are
often the targets they are after. Be careful, greed and desperation can
drive even the most intelligent educated skilled immigrants into these
scams easily.

Individuals may encounter slightly different scenarios of the same
nature - squeeze out the money immigrants bring in. The more desperate
immigrants are, the easier for them to be victims of scams/frauds.
Generally speaking, skilled immigrants ought to be 50 times more frugal
than they would back in their pre-landed countries, especially USA,
because living cost in Canada is not any lower while the probability
and prospects of stable income is dim. Landed skilled immigrants should
decide as soon as possible if they have to stick around because in
Canada, as in USA or Europe, aged people see their opportunities of
making money decrease much more drastically. Aged landed immigrants
without savings are particularly miserable. Again this is personal
viewpoint and observation to share with immigrants.
 
Old May 16th 2003, 12:16 am
  #2  
S B
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Refuse $100 note

Tarapia Tapioco wrote:
    >
    > That's right. Credit cards were invented with one purpose in mind - to
    > beef up commerce by luring people to take debt; security was NOT a
    > concern. Almost all credit cards can be used to, for example, purchase
    > stuff ON-LINE or by phone with only information shown on the cards -
    > this renders your photos useless but greatly facilitates the beef-up of
    > capitalism. Also, almost all credit cards users, especially the ones
    > who love credit cards or depend on credit cards, have no idea how much
    > interest credit cards bear - usually close to 20% per annum. Not a
    > usury since it is permitted by laws but average people wouldn't borrow
    > at 20% interest rate per annum if they know the figure. It doesn't take
    > a banker to know the evils of credit cards. Many people are just
    > ignorant to let credit card operators walk all over themselves. Stay
    > away from credit cards or anything bearing a "credit" lingo. Getting
    > "credit things" is a free ticket to "mounting debt". Never borrow money
    > to spend. This is a must-remember for immigrants. Canada, according to
    > statistics, is not much better than US in debits, both public and
    > private.
    >
    > The best cash-less payment method is debit cards/bank cards. When using
    > bank cards on Interac, one should use them on trusted stores and cover
    > tightly when punching your pin numbers so the cameras behind you can't
    > read your finger movements. Still the best way to pay is cash unless
    > it's a payment of $2,000 or more. If carried-in $100 bills by landed
    > immigrants are not accepted, just convert them to $20 bills at any bank
    > outlets, or simply deposit them in your bank ATMS and withdraw cash
    > afterwards. There is no reason to use $100 bills around. The first
    > thing landed immigrants do is to have a domicile and put all the
    > settlement funds in a bank account and get a bank card. Do not purchase
    > big ticket items in a haste, including cars. There are lots of scams
    > around in Canada designed for ignorant immigrants - some even by early
    > landed immigrants. Landed immigrants especially get cheated easily by
    > earlier landed immigrants from the same country or region on false
    > trust. Allow yourself a minimum of six months to get used to your
    > surroundings by making intense contacts with community and reading
    > local papers. There are scams or even frauds on almost all big-ticket
    > purchases. There was even a case in which seller/agent/lawyer (all
    > locals) cooperate to cheat home-purchasing immigrants on an already
    > sold house.
    >
    > One of the common behavioral models among immigrants, Asian especially
    > for their cultural weakness, is that immigrants always intuitively
    > submit to scams, frauds or straight bullying by locals.


Aged landed immigrants
    > without savings are particularly miserable. Again this is personal
    > viewpoint and observation to share with immigrants.

Snippets of value in there interspersed with a lot of nonsense so it's
hard to tell what's of value and what isn't.

Bottom line for anyone inexperienced is "be careful, but not paranoid
with personal info" (some of the comments verge on paranoia), and the
standard "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is". All the
stuff about who is out to do who is just noise.
 
Old May 16th 2003, 4:51 pm
  #3  
Chris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Refuse $100 note

WHAT A FULL LOAD OF CRAP!
You're a communist, aren't you?
Chris

"Tarapia Tapioco" wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > That's right. Credit cards were invented with one purpose in mind - to
    > beef up commerce by luring people to take debt; security was NOT a
    > concern. Almost all credit cards can be used to, for example, purchase
    > stuff ON-LINE or by phone with only information shown on the cards -
    > this renders your photos useless but greatly facilitates the beef-up of
    > capitalism. Also, almost all credit cards users, especially the ones
    > who love credit cards or depend on credit cards, have no idea how much
    > interest credit cards bear - usually close to 20% per annum. Not a
    > usury since it is permitted by laws but average people wouldn't borrow
    > at 20% interest rate per annum if they know the figure. It doesn't take
    > a banker to know the evils of credit cards. Many people are just
    > ignorant to let credit card operators walk all over themselves. Stay
    > away from credit cards or anything bearing a "credit" lingo. Getting
    > "credit things" is a free ticket to "mounting debt". Never borrow money
    > to spend. This is a must-remember for immigrants. Canada, according to
    > statistics, is not much better than US in debits, both public and
    > private.
    > The best cash-less payment method is debit cards/bank cards. When using
    > bank cards on Interac, one should use them on trusted stores and cover
    > tightly when punching your pin numbers so the cameras behind you can't
    > read your finger movements. Still the best way to pay is cash unless
    > it's a payment of $2,000 or more. If carried-in $100 bills by landed
    > immigrants are not accepted, just convert them to $20 bills at any bank
    > outlets, or simply deposit them in your bank ATMS and withdraw cash
    > afterwards. There is no reason to use $100 bills around. The first
    > thing landed immigrants do is to have a domicile and put all the
    > settlement funds in a bank account and get a bank card. Do not purchase
    > big ticket items in a haste, including cars. There are lots of scams
    > around in Canada designed for ignorant immigrants - some even by early
    > landed immigrants. Landed immigrants especially get cheated easily by
    > earlier landed immigrants from the same country or region on false
    > trust. Allow yourself a minimum of six months to get used to your
    > surroundings by making intense contacts with community and reading
    > local papers. There are scams or even frauds on almost all big-ticket
    > purchases. There was even a case in which seller/agent/lawyer (all
    > locals) cooperate to cheat home-purchasing immigrants on an already
    > sold house.
    > One of the common behavioral models among immigrants, Asian especially
    > for their cultural weakness, is that immigrants always intuitively
    > submit to scams, frauds or straight bullying by locals. Even when
    > immigrants realize they are victims of scams/frauds/bullying/racial
    > violence, they seldom stand up to fight back for various reasons: 1)
    > the legal/police systems always stand in favour of local Caucasians, 2)
    > Many immigrants come from countries colonised by Britts using brute
    > force; hence the intuitive submission to avoid being killed by
    > Caucasians; Canada resembles those colonies in appearance and in
    > substance mostly. This phenomenon is most apparent among Indians,
    > Chinese, and Arabs, who are painted by White supremacist as dirty,
    > filthy, dishonest, coward, and even scums, even they bring in lots of
    > money to support the welfare systems many locals live on.
    > Most locals are under-educated and can't write properly while most
    > skilled immigrants from Asia, Europe or Africa (few because Canada
    > doesn't take African immigrants easily even as refugees). There is no
    > need for skilled immigrants to live in the colonial past. For instance,
    > many local cashiers have problems with numbers. Therefore whenever one
    > does transaction, one should double check the amount. Stop intuitively
    > thinking they are superior to you because they are not. When bullied,
    > always fight back immediately because they are used to bullying
    > immigrants and getting away laughing aloud. When racists tell you to go
    > back, tell them to go back to England because they are illegal
    > immigrants forcing their way in by killing first nations people. When
    > racists apply violence on you, run away as fast as possible because if
    > you get injured or killed, police most likely wouldn't bother stand by
    > you. Many locals are drug addicts. Pot industry is a big deal in
    > Canada. That's why smoking/possessing pot is soon to be decriminalized.
    > Beware if you want to rent out the basement, apartment or a whole
    > house, check in frequently if your local tenants are contributing to
    > the pot industry!
    > Another thing immigrants should beware, in addition to
    > scams/frauds/credit card abuse, is that in Canada you should NOT give
    > ANY personal information to any one UNLESS it is required by LAWS. The
    > most popular scams to harvest personal information for mailing list or
    > plain frauds are 1) prize drawing, 2) contests, 3) random phone
    > marketing, and 4) store membership. Generally speaking, only certain
    > government agencies, e.g., Canada tax, can LEGALLY ask for personal
    > information and certain related laws permitting such acts are quoted on
    > the documents. You can even refuse to provide personal information in
    > all regards to governments since they already have your personal
    > information in Immigration, CCRA, MSP, RCMP, CSIS, etc. repeatedly.
    > There is really no reason for ANY governmental units, e.g., Census or
    > Statistics, to ask you for the same or extra personal information
    > beyond what privacy acts permit. In most countries, personal
    > information is abusive automatically unless specifically banned. In
    > Canada, it's the opposite - personal information is guarded unless the
    > person(s) agrees it can be abused.
    > Beware, dont give any information on phone or in person verbally to ANY
    > parties, including governmental agencies. Dont even tell any stranger
    > callers what your phone number or name is. In North America, it's very
    > common to have junk-callers buzzing randomly to harvest personal
    > information. In Canada, people who ring your phone dont identify
    > themselves or even start asking your name/phone number/etc. are
    > conducting illegal practices such as scams or frauds. Everything,
    > especially governmental requests, should be in writings. Canada has a
    > long nasty history of seeing personal information abused by even
    > governments to conduct illegitimate acts. That's why we have privacy
    > acts and privacy commissioners to more or less stand by people against
    > abusive governments. That's why the passing of C-36 by taking advantage
    > of "scares" was so shockingly significant, which just legitimized tons
    > of definitely, not potentially, abusive acts governments can conduct on
    > Canadian people. Unlike Americans, Canadians in general dont consider
    > "big brother" is a way of or part of life. This is a drastic difference
    > from where most immigrants come from in Europe, Africa or Asia.
    > Normally all you need to give for any governmental units to identify
    > you is your name and your name only, as you would do when stopped by
    > Police since they can always look up your name in their database.
    > Remember the rights you have in silence. Anything you say can be used
    > to charge against you or even abuse you. You may feel pressed to say
    > things intuitively as you did in your pre-landed country/territory. But
    > that would only invite troubles even though they, both public or
    > private parties, would make you feel pressed or obliged to give them
    > your personal information by taking advantage of your ignorance of
    > Canadian regulations.
    > If governments can abuse people on their disclosed personal
    > information, average Joe can certainly walk all over on you based on
    > your personal information, legally if you give them permissions. That's
    > why most scams designed to collect your personal information use baits
    > to lure you and have fine prints stating that you agree to give up your
    > rights for personal information privacy and they are allowed by you to
    > sell your personal information to anyone for any purpose. Lots of
    > scams, mostly based in the US, use the personal information you
    > ignorantly give out to inform you that you have won certain contests
    > (e.g., an SUV) and you must pay "commitment fees" up-front via your
    > "credit cards"! Landed immigrants, desperate for earning money, are
    > often the targets they are after. Be careful, greed and desperation can
    > drive even the most intelligent educated skilled immigrants into these
    > scams easily.
    > Individuals may encounter slightly different scenarios of the same
    > nature - squeeze out the money immigrants bring in. The more desperate
    > immigrants are, the easier for them to be victims of scams/frauds.
    > Generally speaking, skilled immigrants ought to be 50 times more frugal
    > than they would back in their pre-landed countries, especially USA,
    > because living cost in Canada is not any lower while the probability
    > and prospects of stable income is dim. Landed skilled immigrants should
    > decide as soon as possible if they have to stick around because in
    > Canada, as in USA or Europe, aged people see their opportunities of
    > making money decrease much more drastically. Aged landed immigrants
    > without savings are particularly miserable. Again this is personal
    > viewpoint and observation to share with immigrants.
 

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