New rules

Old Jan 12th 2002, 3:39 am
  #1  
Andrew Miller
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If you calculated your points correctly then under certain circumstances you may have
some chance as processing officers will have a discretionary power to approve cases
with less than 80 points (or reject those with 80 or more points). Everything will
depend from the overall picture of your qualifications, skills and abilities and most
importantly from the strong presentation of the case and perfect preparation of
application package.

Of course someone who is not living in Canada can get a job offer from Canadian
employer - how do you think those tens of thousands of Employment Authorizations each
year are granted?

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

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Old Jan 12th 2002, 3:40 am
  #2  
Gl
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Good Morning!!

Below are my points breakdown:

Age :10 Education: 20 Work Experience: 20 Language: 16 Adaptability: 10 Total: 76

Will the immigration officer still consider my application if I only grant 76 pts?
How can someone who is not living in Canada get a job offer from a Canadian employer?
Is there any channels that we can seek job opportunites? From my experience, most
employers would not take non-Canadian.

Tiffany
 
Old Jan 13th 2002, 7:24 pm
  #3  
Gogo
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Which is your source of information about those "tens of thousands of EAs"?

I can't imagine how an employer will take someone whom he/she has never seen. To find
a job one should certainly attain interview(s). And how are most immigrants going to
attend interviews if they don't live in North America? What percentage of immigrants
to Canada come from a different contienent. I bet it should be around the 90%. Now,
it's very simple, all those 90% will not qualify under the new law. In effect this
means that instead of the 100,000 independant immigrants that Canada had last year,
she will only have 10,000. And how will Canada come to the 1% of population target is
a complete mistery for
me.

Canadian politicians are stating that they need immigrants to support their social
system and to advance Canadian society. How are they going to support this system and
advance this society if they can't meet their imm. target?

Another point. What do discretionary powers mean? I understand they mean something
which is not controlled by the law. Now, what this means is, under the new law, I no
longer will be able to go to a lawyer, and ask him/her what my chances to qualify for
immigration are, and receive a meaningful and dependable answer. The lawyers will no
longer have a law they can rely on in their work with immigration cases, but instead
they will have to deal with some sort of secret regulations, that may change at any
time... infact Canadian laws may also change at any time, and they can even apply
retroactively, doesn't seem to have much difference.

Not surprisingly there is not a single lawyer on this newsgroup to say a positive
word for the new immigration law and regulations.

One more point. A lot of people on this ng grumble that Canada has become a safety
net for US H1 holders. Have you heard of the Fast Track system for processing imm.
applications in Buffalo? Why does Canada invest so much money on keeping processing
times in Buffalo short, and neglects the rest of the world?

I don't see conistency in Canadian Federal immigration procedures and that's bad. On
the other hand I see that Quebec has managed to apply its immigration program
persistently and will certainly gain from that. Now I wonder, is this not the begging
of the end of Canadian Federation? I pray I am wrong.

"Andrew Miller" wrote...
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Old Jan 14th 2002, 3:03 am
  #4  
Andrew Miller
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http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pub/fac...mp-4.html#fig3

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

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[usenetquote2]> > If you calculated your points correctly then under certain circumstances[/usenetquote2]
you
[usenetquote2]> > may have some chance as processing officers will have a discretionary power[/usenetquote2]
to
[usenetquote2]> > approve cases with less than 80 points (or reject those with 80 or more points).[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Everything will depend from the overall picture of your qualifications, skills[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > and abilities and most importantly from the strong presentation of the case and[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > perfect preparation of application package.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Of course someone who is not living in Canada can get a job offer from[/usenetquote2]
Canadian
[usenetquote2]> > employer - how do you think those tens of thousands of Employment Authorizations[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > each year are granted?[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > --[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > ../..[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > [email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > sending email)[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > ________________________________[/usenetquote2]
 
Old Jan 14th 2002, 3:13 am
  #5  
Andrew Miller
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Posts: n/a
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Please check the official data here:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pub/fac...mp-4.html#fig3

As you can see just in the year 2000 over 80,000 foreign workers entered Canada.
Majority of them got their job offers without being in Canada for the job interview
and only about 25% of them are from US. So, now tell me - why immigration rules
shouldn't reward those who already showed that they are resourceful and have the
abilities to settle in Canada with bonus points? Most of those foreign workers will
apply for PR status sooner or later, they will be the majority of new immigrants and
80,000 per year is a quite larger number than 10,000 you are claiming in your post.

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

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[usenetquote2]> > If you calculated your points correctly then under certain circumstances[/usenetquote2]
you
[usenetquote2]> > may have some chance as processing officers will have a discretionary power[/usenetquote2]
to
[usenetquote2]> > approve cases with less than 80 points (or reject those with 80 or more points).[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Everything will depend from the overall picture of your qualifications, skills[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > and abilities and most importantly from the strong presentation of the case and[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > perfect preparation of application package.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Of course someone who is not living in Canada can get a job offer from[/usenetquote2]
Canadian
[usenetquote2]> > employer - how do you think those tens of thousands of Employment Authorizations[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > each year are granted?[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > --[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > ../..[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > [email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > sending email)[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > ________________________________[/usenetquote2]
 
Old Jan 14th 2002, 1:20 pm
  #6  
Jillion
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
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I disagree with you on this one, how do you know most of these foreign workers get
their job offers without even being in canada? I can't conclude that from the link
you provided. In fact, over 65% of them are from countries that won't even need a
visitor visa to enter canada (USA, Mexico, UK, France, Japan, Australia, Germany)
btw, 30% of them are from US, not 25% (female workers) as you mentioned. they can
enter canada at will, get an interview and apply for a work permit.

"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]>
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Old Jan 14th 2002, 1:38 pm
  #7  
Jillion
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also check out this official data

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pub/fac.../8work-06.html

over 50% of skilled immigrants in 2000 are from less developed countries (china,
india, pakistan, philippines, romania, russia etc). and how many of them can actually
get a job offer without being in Canada?

"Andrew Miller" <[email protected]>
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Old Jan 14th 2002, 1:50 pm
  #8  
Andrew Miller
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Posts: n/a
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I know because I'm in this business for more than 10 years and I have a lot of
experience with EA and clients moving from EA to PR status through those years - you
don't. Most clients I'm assisting and have assisted in the past in either EA process
or in PR process got their job offers without prior visit to Canada. Do you have any
data or experience substantially different from mine? If yes why won't you produce it
and prove me wrong? I may be wrong generalizing everything based on my own and many
of my colleagues experience, but I can't be wrong by much.

The link was provided to respond to your direct question about the source for the
phrase "tens of thousands EA issued every year" in my previous post.

We may argue here for ages and it will not solve anything, nor be constructive in any
way - it is time to end this thread.

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

"jillion" <[email protected]>
[usenetquote2]> > Please check the official data here:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pub/facts2000-temp/facts-temp-4.html#fig3[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > As you can see just in the year 2000 over 80,000 foreign workers entered Canada.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Majority of them got their job offers without being in Canada for[/usenetquote2]
the
[usenetquote2]> > job interview and only about 25% of them are from US. So, now tell me - why[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > immigration rules shouldn't reward those who already showed that they are[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > resourceful and have the abilities to settle in Canada with bonus points?[/usenetquote2]
Most
[usenetquote2]> > of those foreign workers will apply for PR status sooner or later, they[/usenetquote2]
will be
[usenetquote2]> > the majority of new immigrants and 80,000 per year is a quite larger number than[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > 10,000 you are claiming in your post.[/usenetquote2]
 
Old Jan 14th 2002, 3:53 pm
  #9  
Newsguy
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Posts: n/a
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entered
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for the
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This is BS. I don't see anywhere where majority of them had a job offer without being
in Canada for job interview. If you really look closer into the database - you'll see
that largest numbers of them EA holders are from the countries who can easily enter
Canada and get interviewed (only USA and Mexico comprises 40.34%). Whereas Immigrants
from these two countries are approx. 3% only .
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pub/facts2000/1imm-05.html

That indicates that majority of these EA holders are not interested in immigrating
and/or are probably of corporate relocated workers.

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are
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points?

Only if they were interested in migration. Sure they qualify for the Canadian
immigration, but do Canada qualify for their preferred place to live??

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later, they will be
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Aren't them already doing this and have been included in the annual statistics of
skilled migration? How do you think that these population group will be the major
source of new immigrants under the new rule to fulfil Canada's annual target?

It is not impossible to get a job offer without an interview. But this is not normal
in Canada (very lower percentage of them have that. Where there are hundreds of
thousands of skilled people doing lower level jobs just because they don't have
Canadian Experience how could we think that it could be easier for them to get a job
offer without even an interview?

//NG
 

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