education for new immigrants?

Old Oct 18th 2002, 4:46 am
  #1  
Rs
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default education for new immigrants?

A friend of mine is an older gentleman who has a young lady email penpal in
the Philippines.

She lives in a smaller centre/village and is not very educated ... is in
fact a high school dropout, and even needs help to write her email replies.

If their relationship progressed to the point of him going to Philippines to
meet her, and then marriage plans ensued....could someone answer the
following questions? :

- first of all, would her limited education cause any problems with getting
a fiancé visa?

- would their age difference cause any unusual delay in paperwork being
approved? (she's about 20, he's in late 40's)

- as a not-yet-Canadian-Citizen, is she eligible to upgrade her education
(to high school grad level) at public schools?

- would this be funded by Canadian taxpayers?

Thanks for any knowledgeable feedback, which I will pass on...

RS
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 5:22 am
  #2  
Trikky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

G'day, all! In a recent article, RS ([email protected]) said:

    > A friend of mine is an older gentleman who has a young lady email penpal in
    > the Philippines.
    > She lives in a smaller centre/village and is not very educated ... is in
    > fact a high school dropout, and even needs help to write her email replies.
    > If their relationship progressed to the point of him going to Philippines to
    > meet her, and then marriage plans ensued....could someone answer the
    > following questions? :

    > Thanks for any knowledgeable feedback, which I will pass on...

Not that I particularly WANT to put a damper on things, but this sounds
a lot like someone wanting a passport out of the Philippines and a lot less
like true love. If you are a true friend, you should make your friend aware
of all those gals from places such as Russia, Philippines, China etc looking
for 'love' as a way to get them a better life.

You certainly shouldn't be worrying NOW about if taxpayers will be
paying for high school education or not.

Watch your friend's back and don't let him be someone's mealticket.

--
Trikky T; Vancouver, B.C. Canada
Remove UPPERCASE letters from Email address to reply.
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 5:36 am
  #3  
Canucklehead
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

"Trikky" wrote in message
news:B9D59141.29ABE%trikkyTAKEOU-
[email protected]
...
    > G'day, all! In a recent article, RS ([email protected])
said:

    > Not that I particularly WANT to put a damper on things, but this
sounds
    > a lot like someone wanting a passport out of the Philippines and a lot
less
    > like true love. If you are a true friend, you should make your friend
aware
    > of all those gals from places such as Russia, Philippines, China etc
looking
    > for 'love' as a way to get them a better life.
    > You certainly shouldn't be worrying NOW about if taxpayers will be
    > paying for high school education or not.
    > Watch your friend's back and don't let him be someone's mealticket.
Yeah I was thinking the same thing. I am sure Canadian Immigration would go
over this one with a fine tooth comb. Sounds like a marriage of convienience
to me. They would wonder what an older man from Canada would have in common
with an uneducated young woman from the Philippines.
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 6:46 am
  #4  
Greg Del Pilar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

Hi!

    > Not that I particularly WANT to put a damper on things, but this
sounds
    > a lot like someone wanting a passport out of the Philippines and a lot
less
    > like true love. If you are a true friend, you should make your friend
aware
    > of all those gals from places such as Russia, Philippines, China etc
looking
    > for 'love' as a way to get them a better life.
    > You certainly shouldn't be worrying NOW about if taxpayers will be
    > paying for high school education or not.
    > Watch your friend's back and don't let him be someone's mealticket.

To be fair, you should also ask your friend what his real intentions are to
be sure that no one will end up being someone's mealticket and/or slave
victim. I know it's none of my business, but I'm seriously in doubt about a
50-year old man's intentions with a 20-year old illiterate, innocent, girl
from a rural area. He's probably aware about how easily they can be lured
with promises of a better life. She may not have even seen a passport in her
entire life. How can a person truly be in-loved with someone after so many
email (and picture) exchanges, specially if she can't even communicate with
him without a translator? And planning to marry her after seeing her in
person for a few days?

To answer your friend's question: her education should (and will not) be
paid by taxpayers, as she will have to pay for her own tuition if she
decides to go to school (just like any landed immigrant). As far as I know,
both Canadian citizens and landed mmigrants pay the same amount of fees.

Thank you.

Greg
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 12:32 pm
  #5  
Cynically amused.
 
Joined: Oct 2002
Location: BC
Posts: 3,648
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Default Re: education for new immigrants?

Originally posted by Greg Del Pilar:
Hi!

    > Not that I particularly WANT to put a damper on things, but this
sounds
    > a lot like someone wanting a passport out of the Philippines and a lot
less
    > like true love. If you are a true friend, you should make your friend
aware
    > of all those gals from places such as Russia, Philippines, China etc
looking
    > for 'love' as a way to get them a better life.
    > You certainly shouldn't be worrying NOW about if taxpayers will be
    > paying for high school education or not.
    > Watch your friend's back and don't let him be someone's mealticket.

To be fair, you should also ask your friend what his real intentions are to
be sure that no one will end up being someone's mealticket and/or slave
victim. I know it's none of my business, but I'm seriously in doubt about a
50-year old man's intentions with a 20-year old illiterate, innocent, girl
from a rural area. He's probably aware about how easily they can be lured
with promises of a better life. She may not have even seen a passport in her
entire life. How can a person truly be in-loved with someone after so many
email (and picture) exchanges, specially if she can't even communicate with
him without a translator? And planning to marry her after seeing her in
person for a few days?

To answer your friend's question: her education should (and will not) be
paid by taxpayers, as she will have to pay for her own tuition if she
decides to go to school (just like any landed immigrant). As far as I know,
both Canadian citizens and landed mmigrants pay the same amount of fees.

Thank you.

Greg
???? I think CIC might have some serious concerns frankly.
dingbat is offline  
Old Oct 18th 2002, 12:43 pm
  #6  
Rs
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

Yes, the cautionary tone of the responses thus far is understandable....and
appreciated.

My friend has some reservations as well -- esp. since he has never met the
young lady in question ... and her emails are translation efforts. He says
he makes no mention of "love" on his part (in his emails to her) ... as he
also observes: "we've never even met', and it makes no sense at this point.

He says a trip to the Phillippines would only be in order if the email
contact goes of for some extended period. He also adds that a trip to the
Phil. would by no means mean that marriage was a "done deal".

She has expressed an interest in continuing her education, and my friend
would like to see that happen, if she should eventually wind up in Canada.

-RS-

PS: has anyone reading this newsgroup know of any successful "spring-winter"
marriages with Filipinas? What is the maximum age spread that anyone knows
of having worked out ( ... seemingly, over some years at least) ?


"Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
news:XFYr9.534070$v53.22-
[email protected]
...
    > To be fair, you should also ask your friend what his real intentions are
to
    > be sure that no one will end up being someone's mealticket and/or slave
    > victim. I know it's none of my business, but I'm seriously in doubt about
a
    > 50-year old man's intentions with a 20-year old illiterate, innocent, girl
    > from a rural area. He's probably aware about how easily they can be lured
    > with promises of a better life. She may not have even seen a passport in
her
    > entire life. How can a person truly be in-loved with someone after so many
    > email (and picture) exchanges, specially if she can't even communicate
with
    > him without a translator? And planning to marry her after seeing her in
    > person for a few days?
    > To answer your friend's question: her education should (and will not) be
    > paid by taxpayers, as she will have to pay for her own tuition if she
    > decides to go to school (just like any landed immigrant). As far as I
know,
    > both Canadian citizens and landed mmigrants pay the same amount of fees.
    > Thank you.
    > Greg
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 2:33 pm
  #7  
Greg Del Pilar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

    > ???? I think CIC might have some serious concerns frankly.

I agree. A long distance, May-December relationship like what had been
described will be highly scrutinized by immigration officials, regardless of
where the foreign national is coming from (including rich countries such as
the US).
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 2:52 pm
  #8  
Greg Del Pilar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

RS:

A few comments for your friend:

i) if he can spend some time in the Philippines (three to six months) to get
to know the woman AND her family, then he'll be in a far better position to
judge for himself whether to proceed further or not. (Of couerse, don't go
to the Southern region, as there are currently few bombing incidents that
are similar to the much-publicized ones in Bali, Indonesia.)

ii) if the woman is what you've described, chances are she'll be good to
have around the house (you know, clean the house, wash the clothes, cook for
him, etc.), but will probably NOT be an ideal partner for life-long
intelligent conversations. Your friend will need to assess for himself what
kind of marital relationship he's looking for.

iii) If she is as "simple" as you have described, she'll probably stick
around with him (as opposed to just using him to get Canadian residence),
because her general upbringing normally consist of traditional Filipino
values (close family ties, lifetime commitment to a partner, no idea what
divorce means or does not believe in it, stay-at-home wife/mother, etc.).
However, if she really wants to pursue her studies, that implies that she
has ambitions.

(Again, none of my business, but: your friend cannot find a Canadian woman
to fall in love with?)

Greg


"RS" wrote in message
news:gV1s9.22387$wU3.21296-
[email protected]
...
    > Yes, the cautionary tone of the responses thus far is
understandable....and
    > appreciated.
    > My friend has some reservations as well -- esp. since he has never met the
    > young lady in question ... and her emails are translation efforts. He says
    > he makes no mention of "love" on his part (in his emails to her) ... as he
    > also observes: "we've never even met', and it makes no sense at this
point.
    > He says a trip to the Phillippines would only be in order if the email
    > contact goes of for some extended period. He also adds that a trip to the
    > Phil. would by no means mean that marriage was a "done deal".
    > She has expressed an interest in continuing her education, and my friend
    > would like to see that happen, if she should eventually wind up in Canada.
    > -RS-
    > PS: has anyone reading this newsgroup know of any successful
"spring-winter"
    > marriages with Filipinas? What is the maximum age spread that anyone knows
    > of having worked out ( ... seemingly, over some years at least) ?
    > "Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
    > news:XFYr9.534070$v53.-
    > [email protected]
    ...
    > >
    > > To be fair, you should also ask your friend what his real intentions are
    > to
    > > be sure that no one will end up being someone's mealticket and/or slave
    > > victim. I know it's none of my business, but I'm seriously in doubt
about
    > a
    > > 50-year old man's intentions with a 20-year old illiterate, innocent,
girl
    > > from a rural area. He's probably aware about how easily they can be
lured
    > > with promises of a better life. She may not have even seen a passport in
    > her
    > > entire life. How can a person truly be in-loved with someone after so
many
    > > email (and picture) exchanges, specially if she can't even communicate
    > with
    > > him without a translator? And planning to marry her after seeing her in
    > > person for a few days?
    > >
    > > To answer your friend's question: her education should (and will not) be
    > > paid by taxpayers, as she will have to pay for her own tuition if she
    > > decides to go to school (just like any landed immigrant). As far as I
    > know,
    > > both Canadian citizens and landed mmigrants pay the same amount of fees.
    > >
    > > Thank you.
    > >
    > > Greg
    > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 3:01 pm
  #9  
Greg Del Pilar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

Hi!

Just curious about one thing:

If a Canadian marries a foreign national and subsequently sponsors him/her
for PR so that they could both live in Canada as partners, does CIC really
have any chance to reject PR status for the person (assuming the marriage
was real, and that there are no grounds for inadmissibility)? I always
thought that a Canadian citizen or PR has the right to sponsor his/her
spouse to be with him/her in Canada, and that the sponsorship process is
just a standard procedure of bringing him/her here properly (i.e., with all
the necessary documentation).

Thanks for your comments.

Greg


"Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
news:Lv3s9.568357$f05.23-
[email protected]
...
    > > ???? I think CIC might have some serious concerns frankly.
    > >
    > I agree. A long distance, May-December relationship like what had been
    > described will be highly scrutinized by immigration officials, regardless
of
    > where the foreign national is coming from (including rich countries such
as
    > the US).
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 4:27 pm
  #10  
Trikky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

G'day, all! In a recent article, Greg Del Pilar ([email protected])
said:

    > Hi!
    > Just curious about one thing:
    > If a Canadian marries a foreign national and subsequently sponsors him/her
    > for PR so that they could both live in Canada as partners, does CIC really
    > have any chance to reject PR status for the person (assuming the marriage
    > was real, and that there are no grounds for inadmissibility)? I always
    > thought that a Canadian citizen or PR has the right to sponsor his/her
    > spouse to be with him/her in Canada, and that the sponsorship process is
    > just a standard procedure of bringing him/her here properly (i.e., with all
    > the necessary documentation).

It's certainly more than a mere formality. The sponsored person could
be rejected and, in the case of a PR being the sponsor, if it's found to be
fraudulent, the sponsor's PR status could be reviewed.

As for what sort of chance CIC has to reject an application? EVERY
chance.
    :-)
--
Trikky T; Vancouver, B.C. Canada
Remove UPPERCASE letters from Email address to reply.
 
Old Oct 18th 2002, 4:51 pm
  #11  
Pearl
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

Read the post dated Oct 18, 2002 posted by GREGCA entitled "Being used sponsorship". Beware.

Pearl

Originally posted by Rs:
Yes, the cautionary tone of the responses thus far is understandable....and
appreciated.

My friend has some reservations as well -- esp. since he has never met the
young lady in question ... and her emails are translation efforts. He says
he makes no mention of "love" on his part (in his emails to her) ... as he
also observes: "we've never even met', and it makes no sense at this point.

He says a trip to the Phillippines would only be in order if the email
contact goes of for some extended period. He also adds that a trip to the
Phil. would by no means mean that marriage was a "done deal".

She has expressed an interest in continuing her education, and my friend
would like to see that happen, if she should eventually wind up in Canada.

-RS-

PS: has anyone reading this newsgroup know of any successful "spring-winter"
marriages with Filipinas? What is the maximum age spread that anyone knows
of having worked out ( ... seemingly, over some years at least) ?


"Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
news:XFYr9.534070$v53.22-
[email protected]...
    > To be fair, you should also ask your friend what his real intentions are
to
    > be sure that no one will end up being someone's mealticket and/or slave
    > victim. I know it's none of my business, but I'm seriously in doubt about
a
    > 50-year old man's intentions with a 20-year old illiterate, innocent, girl
    > from a rural area. He's probably aware about how easily they can be lured
    > with promises of a better life. She may not have even seen a passport in
her
    > entire life. How can a person truly be in-loved with someone after so many
    > email (and picture) exchanges, specially if she can't even communicate
with
    > him without a translator? And planning to marry her after seeing her in
    > person for a few days?
    > To answer your friend's question: her education should (and will not) be
    > paid by taxpayers, as she will have to pay for her own tuition if she
    > decides to go to school (just like any landed immigrant). As far as I
know,
    > both Canadian citizens and landed mmigrants pay the same amount of fees.
    > Thank you.
    > Greg
 
Old Oct 19th 2002, 9:49 am
  #12  
Charlotte
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

While it is your right to marry whom ever you choose, there is no
obligation on the part of CIC to grant PR to your sponsored spouse.
There are too many cases to list where spouses have been denied entry
to Canada.

If the person being sponsored is interviewed and doesn't have
sufficient knowledge about their spouse (or previous to 6/28/02 -
fiance), then they can be denied on the grounds that the relationship
doesn't appear to be legit.

Many people who have had arranged marriages have had a difficult time
with the proof of relationship as there is often no courtship before
getting married.

There was a case where a previously married woman admitted to the
interviewing officer that she wished to come to Canada in order to
give her son from her previous marriage the opportunity for a better
life. The officer decided that the marriage was not legit, and that
the woman got married for immigration purposes. This eventually got
turned over in the court of appeal as the immigration officer had not
applied the correct test, which was whether or not the woman intended
to come and reside with her Cdn. spouse, which was her intention.

There is really nothing standard about the procedure.

charlotte



"Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message news:...
    > Hi!
    > Just curious about one thing:
    > If a Canadian marries a foreign national and subsequently sponsors him/her
    > for PR so that they could both live in Canada as partners, does CIC really
    > have any chance to reject PR status for the person (assuming the marriage
    > was real, and that there are no grounds for inadmissibility)? I always
    > thought that a Canadian citizen or PR has the right to sponsor his/her
    > spouse to be with him/her in Canada, and that the sponsorship process is
    > just a standard procedure of bringing him/her here properly (i.e., with all
    > the necessary documentation).
    > Thanks for your comments.
    > Greg
    > "Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
    > news:Lv3s9.568357$f05.-
    > [email protected]
    ...
    > > > ???? I think CIC might have some serious concerns frankly.
    > > >
    > >
    > > I agree. A long distance, May-December relationship like what had been
    > > described will be highly scrutinized by immigration officials, regardless
    > of
    > > where the foreign national is coming from (including rich countries such
    > as
    > > the US).
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
 
Old Oct 19th 2002, 2:54 pm
  #13  
Rs
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: education for new immigrants?

I'll ask my friend about " ... your friend cannot find a Canadian woman to
fall in love with?" ...

But I think the answer to that is he doesn't go out much at all
(recreationally) ... doesn't drink, and the bar scene doesn't appeal to him.
Now obviously there has got to be other places to meet prospective mates!
;-)

The internet is convenient and he has heard of people meeting / getting
together via it.

As to the idea of my friend spending time with the candidate mate, it so
happens, apparently, that she is indeed in the southern / troubled region,
and it would involve the young lady, accompanied by a chaperone, going to a
safer area to meet him. This would seemingly / unfortunately, obviate an
extended visit.

What you say about having someone of similar intellect, if not articulation,
to partner with ... is indeed food for thought, and my friend has expressed
some concern about this. Like: how likely would it be for similar interests
to develop?

As for ambitions, I have seem some of the emails from her, and I don't
really see any burning educational longing in evidence. I think she says it
more due to the embarassement of being a drop-out, and being the 'right
thing to say'....just my 2 cents worth. She speaks regularly of goals such
as being a good mother and house-keeper for a man who would be faithful to
her...

-RS-


"
"Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
news:rN3s9.568479$f05.23-
[email protected]
...
    > RS:
    > A few comments for your friend:
    > i) if he can spend some time in the Philippines (three to six months) to
get
    > to know the woman AND her family, then he'll be in a far better position
to
    > judge for himself whether to proceed further or not. (Of couerse, don't go
    > to the Southern region, as there are currently few bombing incidents that
    > are similar to the much-publicized ones in Bali, Indonesia.)
    > ii) if the woman is what you've described, chances are she'll be good to
    > have around the house (you know, clean the house, wash the clothes, cook
for
    > him, etc.), but will probably NOT be an ideal partner for life-long
    > intelligent conversations. Your friend will need to assess for himself
what
    > kind of marital relationship he's looking for.
    > iii) If she is as "simple" as you have described, she'll probably stick
    > around with him (as opposed to just using him to get Canadian residence),
    > because her general upbringing normally consist of traditional Filipino
    > values (close family ties, lifetime commitment to a partner, no idea what
    > divorce means or does not believe in it, stay-at-home wife/mother, etc.).
    > However, if she really wants to pursue her studies, that implies that she
    > has ambitions.
    > (Again, none of my business, but: your friend cannot find a Canadian woman
    > to fall in love with?)
    > Greg
    > "RS" wrote in message
    > news:gV1s9.22387$wU3.212-
    > [email protected]
    ...
    > > Yes, the cautionary tone of the responses thus far is
    > understandable....and
    > > appreciated.
    > >
    > > My friend has some reservations as well -- esp. since he has never met
the
    > > young lady in question ... and her emails are translation efforts. He
says
    > > he makes no mention of "love" on his part (in his emails to her) ... as
he
    > > also observes: "we've never even met', and it makes no sense at this
    > point.
    > >
    > > He says a trip to the Phillippines would only be in order if the email
    > > contact goes of for some extended period. He also adds that a trip to
the
    > > Phil. would by no means mean that marriage was a "done deal".
    > >
    > > She has expressed an interest in continuing her education, and my friend
    > > would like to see that happen, if she should eventually wind up in
Canada.
    > >
    > > -RS-
    > >
    > > PS: has anyone reading this newsgroup know of any successful
    > "spring-winter"
    > > marriages with Filipinas? What is the maximum age spread that anyone
knows
    > > of having worked out ( ... seemingly, over some years at least) ?
    > >
    > >
    > > "Greg Del Pilar" wrote in message
    > > news:XFYr9.534070$v5-
    > > [email protected]
    ...
    > > >
    > > > To be fair, you should also ask your friend what his real intentions
are
    > > to
    > > > be sure that no one will end up being someone's mealticket and/or
slave
    > > > victim. I know it's none of my business, but I'm seriously in doubt
    > about
    > > a
    > > > 50-year old man's intentions with a 20-year old illiterate, innocent,
    > girl
    > > > from a rural area. He's probably aware about how easily they can be
    > lured
    > > > with promises of a better life. She may not have even seen a passport
in
    > > her
    > > > entire life. How can a person truly be in-loved with someone after so
    > many
    > > > email (and picture) exchanges, specially if she can't even
communicate
    > > with
    > > > him without a translator? And planning to marry her after seeing her
in
    > > > person for a few days?
    > > >
    > > > To answer your friend's question: her education should (and will not)
be
    > > > paid by taxpayers, as she will have to pay for her own tuition if she
    > > > decides to go to school (just like any landed immigrant). As far as I
    > > know,
    > > > both Canadian citizens and landed mmigrants pay the same amount of
fees.
    > > >
    > > > Thank you.
    > > >
    > > > Greg
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
 

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