Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > Canada > Immigration & Citizenship (Canada)
Reload this Page >

Bill C-11 and Independent Skilled Worker Immigration

Bill C-11 and Independent Skilled Worker Immigration

Old Sep 10th 2001, 3:02 am
  #1  
Sherlock
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hello,

Does the new proposed bill C-11 affect the requirements/conditions for Independent
Skilled Workers?

/Thanks/
 
Old Sep 10th 2001, 3:10 am
  #2  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yes, it does substantially. The main change in the debated bill is in the selection
criteria in the Independent category. New selection criteria will be moved away from
occupation based (no more GOL) and more emphasis will be put on the education, work
experience, transferable skills, language and adaptability.

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
 
Old Sep 10th 2001, 10:14 am
  #3  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 243
CN Tower is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

...if I may, I would also like to ask a question based on this information. If the NOC is being abolished, will a more generalised perspective on education/work experience/language/adaptability have any bearing on whether someone without a university education is likely to qualify? The current NOC-situation (specifically for 'computer programmer') states that someone would be eligible 'usually with a degree'. And it is this single factor that is deterring me from submitting an Independent application.

My Canadian longterm-partner and I are considering marriage as this seems to be our only option, but regardless of whether we would marry at some point in the future, I would in my heart-of-hearts, love to be able to achieve PR on my own merits.

I realise that this is purely speculative and I think I already know what the response to this post will be, but I need to think carefully before proceeding and I could really do with a bit of expert clarity.

Some people say 'go for it' - I have talked to people who scored far lower points than I ever would have thought possible in a successful application...and aside from not having that 'piece of paper', I think I could put together a good case - plus I would *welcome* an interview if it were a chance to show how committed I am to making this move.

If I thought that there was any chance at all that I could qualify as an Independent, I wouldn't hesitate to apply, so if anyone has any advice for me, I would be supremely grateful - is it completely unheard of? Extremely unlikely? And finally, if I were to volunteer the information that I would be relocating with my Canadian partner (ie if I am turned down, I could marry him and apply again) would that go in my favour in showing that I am serious enough to try the more 'difficult' route?

Sorry for the long post, thanks for any help you people may be able to give...

Regards,

Claire

CN Tower is offline  
Old Sep 10th 2001, 12:32 pm
  #4  
Berto Volpentesta
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bill C-11 proposes changes to the selection criteria. There were = several models
considered. The final version will only be available = when the Regulations have
been produced.

We certainly hope that the government moves away from trying to micro = manage the
economy with what they consider to be in demand jobs. =20

And, IMO, if they would be so kind as to remove a substantial portion of = discretion
from the personal suitablility factor or better instruct = officers on how to use it,
this would go a long way in any model.

--=20 Good luck,

Berto Volpentesta, B.A. (Spec. Hons.), B.Ed. Member, OPIC Director, OPIC and
Education Committee Chairman

Sidhu & Volpentesta Inc. Serving people around the world since 1991

www.svcanada.com

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
 
Old Sep 10th 2001, 1:43 pm
  #5  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I couldn't agree with you more Berto. But unfortunately proposed regulations are
giving even more discretionary power to processing officers than existing ones. With
the abandonment of GOL the only precisely measurable factors in proposed regulations
are age, education, work experience (but not 100%), language skills (also subjective
to a degree) and arranged employment. Everything else in selection criteria is rather
subjective and results of the application will depend more than today from the strong
presentation of the case.

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

Bill C-11 proposes changes to the selection criteria. There were several models
considered. The final version will only be available when the Regulations have
been produced.

We certainly hope that the government moves away from trying to micro manage the
economy with what they consider to be in demand jobs.

And, IMO, if they would be so kind as to remove a substantial portion of discretion
from the personal suitablility factor or better instruct officers on how to use it,
this would go a long way in any model.

--
Good luck,

Berto Volpentesta, B.A. (Spec. Hons.), B.Ed. Member, OPIC Director, OPIC and
Education Committee Chairman

Sidhu & Volpentesta Inc. Serving people around the world since 1991

www.svcanada.com

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.