Travel Bug...

Old Mar 18th 2013, 2:14 am
  #16  
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

My parents love the adventure of travelling, they jumped on the idea of the package holiday all over Europe in the late 60's when many were still staying at home in the UK.

My parents had 3 of us under the age of 5 and still took us all over Europe on trains, buses and planes. One of my earliest memories when I was 5 travelling by train first from London Victoria on the boat train, getting on a boat to Belgium and then another train all the way to Rimini in Italy. I can still remember travelling through the night and pulling back the carrage curtains to find that we were twisting our way through the Alps. amazing for a 5 year old to see. You don't get the romance of travel like that now with the Euro tunnel, used to be SOOOOOOOO SOOOO exciting arriving at London Victoria and seeing the sign for 'trains for boats to the continent' sign. I know you can jump straight on a flashy modern train at St Pancras that wil take you all the way but it just isn't the same as the boast train and then changing at Dover Western Docks for the boat.

My parents also took us to Eastern Europe just as the Berlin wall was coming down and before it became trendy for bucks and hens nights. I can remember us all being ordered off the bus at the border between Germany and Czecholsolvakia as it still was then, it was about 2am and surrounded by pine trees, we all had to stand in a line with our passports. It looked like a scene out of some war movie, you half expected machine guns to open up!! There we stood for at least and hour before getting back on the bus on on our way.

Then we went to Africa and worked our way through Kenya and the border area between Kenya and Tanzania.

So many adventres growing up, not just overseas but in the UK as well. I parents always loved to explore and most weekends we would go somewhere around the UK. I was very lucky indeed to see the majority of Europe growing up and other parts of the world also and I feel I have been to every corner of the UK.

I guess those experiences always meant I would keep on exploring and looking for adventure as an adult.
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Old Mar 18th 2013, 8:24 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Last month on my personal blog (February, "Expats in the family tree"), I speculated that travelling and expat-dom could be "in the blood". It certainly seems to be in my family and my wife's, and our Norwegian granddaughters are going to have to be pretty freaky NOT to become expats in their turn. They are Norwegian because their mother was and is; she and our son met up on the hippie trail in Latin America, and he had been a true expat there at the time.

If BritishExpats members were to peer up into the branches of their family trees they might find some expats there, as I did. There was more international movement than one might expect, among the British of earlier times.
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Old Mar 18th 2013, 10:07 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

I'm the only one out of my large family to have travelled all over the shop,i love the freedom,the adventure,the places ya see,but mostly the wonderfully kind/funny/drunk/weird/****ed up strangers i have met and friends i have made along the way.Keep on keeping on,there are so many more adventures ahead,in this life and the next
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Old Mar 18th 2013, 10:28 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by Bernieboy View Post
I'm the only one out of my large family to have travelled all over the shop,i love the freedom,the adventure,the places ya see,but mostly the wonderfully kind/funny/drunk/weird/****ed up strangers i have met and friends i have made along the way.Keep on keeping on,there are so many more adventures ahead,in this life and the next
You truly are 'The Littlest Hobo'

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Old Mar 18th 2013, 10:33 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by rasen78 View Post
You truly are 'The Littlest Hobo'

http://youtube.com/watch?v=banXT6azA-4
The ears are too big
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Old Mar 18th 2013, 10:48 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
Last month on my personal blog (February, "Expats in the family tree"), I speculated that travelling and expat-dom could be "in the blood". It certainly seems to be in my family and my wife's, and our Norwegian granddaughters are going to have to be pretty freaky NOT to become expats in their turn. They are Norwegian because their mother was and is; she and our son met up on the hippie trail in Latin America, and he had been a true expat there at the time.

If BritishExpats members were to peer up into the branches of their family trees they might find some expats there, as I did. There was more international movement than one might expect, among the British of earlier times.
My mother's family had lived, certainly back 7-8 generations, in the same very small pit village in the north east. I feel that it was probably the same much, much, much further back. Her family were horrified when she married a man from 7 miles away and moved to a completely different village (4.6 miles away)

My dad's family had lived, certainly back 10 generations, in the same village in the north east. My gran caused scandal and outrage when, on remarrying, she took up with a man from Basildon. That's practically foreign! Mind you, he was working as a postman in her village, so it's not like she went far to find him.

The only overseas travel that any of them had was during the first and second World Wars.

Growing up, an exotic holiday for us was a trip to Scotland. Mostly, it was a week in a caravan in Whitley Bay or (very special holidays) in Whitby.

We were pooooooor people!

My overseas trips were all courtesy of school although my brother and Mam did go on an exchange trip to Paris with my brother's Judo club. (oh the excitement!)

My dad though, he was in the Merchant Navy when I was born and travelled all over the world. He'd come home with his exciting tales of warm seas and white sandy beaches, how he'd swum off the coast of Australia, snorkelled in the Caribbean, etc etc. My mam made him give it up when I was about 2

When I was 7, my parents were offered the chance to emigrate to Australia, it was a different world, both sets of grandparents pitched a fit so they didn't come.

Once I left home and married someone who could keep me in the standard to which I longed to become accustomed, we travelled a lot. Nothing particularly exotic (Greek islands of various descriptions, European driving holidays, lots of the Algarve and Northern France) but we tried to stay off the obvious tourist trail and explore when we could. I loved it. I loved finding out about the culture and learning some of the language etc etc.

So here we are, several years down the line - both my brother and I have successfully migrated - he has lived in Greece for 9 years (anniversary today, he says he's spending it sitting crying in a corner, rocking back and forward but I'm sure he's joking ) and me in Australia (obviously). No family history of travel until my Dad, so it's all his fault.

Since we came here, we've mostly concentrated on discovering the different areas of Australia but there's plenty more to explore once we're fed up with that.

(Emma, this is what you call a 'pontificating waffle'... although some of it is even relevant to the OP )

(Oh, and Dorothy/MP/Seasider, I'm really looking forward to the next instalment of 'The Girls Go Wild in Sydney')
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 12:41 am
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Question Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
Last month on my personal blog (February, "Expats in the family tree"),
If BritishExpats members were to peer up into the branches of their family trees they might find some expats there, as I did. There was more international movement than one might expect, among the British of earlier times.
Yes my great, great several greats uncle was an expat he came to Tassie as a convict
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 4:34 am
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

My grandfather and his brother (one of 14!) were shipped off to an orphanage at the end of WW1 (their dad was killed in August 1918 and their mother had died in 1917. They were being cared for by the eldest sister, but she couldn't cope with 13 kids, so the boys got sent to the orphanage till they were old enough to work. Anyway, he and his brother emigrated to Canada. The brother stayed, and he came back. My aunt emigrated to NZ in the 50's.

If you go far enough back in my father's family, they were Dutch, and then went to Cornwall to escape religious persecution. (Zeale-Holmes was their surname.)
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 5:01 am
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Travelling is definitely in my blood.


Historically, my mothers family are from lots of places - she's a blend of Dutch colonial merchants, local Sri Lankans and an adventurous Scottish woman (my great-grandmother) who followed her heart to go and live on the sub-continent with her exotic dutch boyfriend she met at Glasgow Uni and walk away from everything she knew. In the meantime her sister left Scotland and moved to NE USA somewhere... reasonably radical for a late 1800's family of a successful civil engineer?!

My fathers side are lot more sedate - just a bunch of Cumbrians who never went anywhere much - but he does have a sister who moved to Canada on a whim in her early 20s... so the adventurous spirit is clearly somewhere in those genes too.

When I was growing up (back in southern England) my family always enjoyed travelling, we had countless holidays all over Europe. I cant remember the first time I holidayed abroad 'cos it happened so frequently. Some holidays were well trodden locations (Majorca, Paris, Portugal... Alpine skiing etc etc) - others were slightly less mainstream (Tunisia, Northern Portugal, Norway). When I got the chance I joined school trips that travelled Europe further and when I was 15 I was in an orchestra that had a 5 week tour of Australia. I was hooked.... Not necessarily on Australia, but on travel - even the 'exotic' smell of Bangkok airport (during our 2 hour transit stop) was fascinating... I needed to travel further afield than Europe.

My uni days unfortunately saw little opportunity for exotic travel - I simply didnt have the funds, but I did hitch-hike all over the UK and Northern Europe for holidays and got to meet some really interesting folk and see some great places (Belgium remains Europes best kept secret if you ask me).

After I joined the workforce I dreamt of trekking huge mountain ranges, lying on fine white sandy beaches and discussing world events with lowly goat-herders and spent many an hour thinking about where to go. I spent some time trekking in the Peruvian Andes and loved every second (even the ones spent doubled over with agonising stomach cramps or cursing the thieving git who left me with insufficient clothing on a mountaintop). When I returned to the UK I was culture shocked by how horribly uniform and compliant everyone was... I couldnt settle in again. The thought of a commercial xmas drove me insane - so I planned a getaway. This time there was very limited budget, so I couldn't go far.

As luck would have it Egyptian terrorists stuck out and gunned down a bunch of tourists in Luxor just before xmas and the bottom fell out of prices of flights to Egypt! I announced I was going and to my surprise I soon had a gang of 7 friends also keen to escape the xmas madness and go somewhere different. It was a tough holiday - too many people with different ideas of what 'the right thing to do' was. But in the end everyone had a fascinating experience and a memorable xmas and new year.

Soon after, life in the UK lost its sheen again and I felt a more permanent move was in order. I took a sicky from work, grabbed a working holiday visa and booked a flight to Australia.... the rest is history!

I have since then travelled extensively around SE Asia, East Africa and of course Oceania. I go through periods now where the 'itchy feet' aren't quite as itchy as they once were - but then it picks up a gear and I really want to visit somewhere. I still haven't made it to the Himalayas - and its on the 'to do' list. I don't think I'll ever lose that hunger for new experiences that drives the need to travel.
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 9:11 am
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by DadAgain View Post
Travelling is definitely in my blood.


Historically, my mothers family are from lots of places - she's a blend of Dutch colonial merchants, local Sri Lankans and an adventurous Scottish woman (my great-grandmother) who followed her heart to go and live on the sub-continent with her exotic dutch boyfriend she met at Glasgow Uni and walk away from everything she knew. In the meantime her sister left Scotland and moved to NE USA somewhere... reasonably radical for a late 1800's family of a successful civil engineer?!

My fathers side are lot more sedate - just a bunch of Cumbrians who never went anywhere much - but he does have a sister who moved to Canada on a whim in her early 20s... so the adventurous spirit is clearly somewhere in those genes too.

When I was growing up (back in southern England) my family always enjoyed travelling, we had countless holidays all over Europe. I cant remember the first time I holidayed abroad 'cos it happened so frequently. Some holidays were well trodden locations (Majorca, Paris, Portugal... Alpine skiing etc etc) - others were slightly less mainstream (Tunisia, Northern Portugal, Norway). When I got the chance I joined school trips that travelled Europe further and when I was 15 I was in an orchestra that had a 5 week tour of Australia. I was hooked.... Not necessarily on Australia, but on travel - even the 'exotic' smell of Bangkok airport (during our 2 hour transit stop) was fascinating... I needed to travel further afield than Europe.

My uni days unfortunately saw little opportunity for exotic travel - I simply didnt have the funds, but I did hitch-hike all over the UK and Northern Europe for holidays and got to meet some really interesting folk and see some great places (Belgium remains Europes best kept secret if you ask me).

After I joined the workforce I dreamt of trekking huge mountain ranges, lying on fine white sandy beaches and discussing world events with lowly goat-herders and spent many an hour thinking about where to go. I spent some time trekking in the Peruvian Andes and loved every second (even the ones spent doubled over with agonising stomach cramps or cursing the thieving git who left me with insufficient clothing on a mountaintop). When I returned to the UK I was culture shocked by how horribly uniform and compliant everyone was... I couldnt settle in again. The thought of a commercial xmas drove me insane - so I planned a getaway. This time there was very limited budget, so I couldn't go far.

As luck would have it Egyptian terrorists stuck out and gunned down a bunch of tourists in Luxor just before xmas and the bottom fell out of prices of flights to Egypt! I announced I was going and to my surprise I soon had a gang of 7 friends also keen to escape the xmas madness and go somewhere different. It was a tough holiday - too many people with different ideas of what 'the right thing to do' was. But in the end everyone had a fascinating experience and a memorable xmas and new year.

Soon after, life in the UK lost its sheen again and I felt a more permanent move was in order. I took a sicky from work, grabbed a working holiday visa and booked a flight to Australia.... the rest is history!

I have since then travelled extensively around SE Asia, East Africa and of course Oceania. I go through periods now where the 'itchy feet' aren't quite as itchy as they once were - but then it picks up a gear and I really want to visit somewhere. I still haven't made it to the Himalayas - and its on the 'to do' list. I don't think I'll ever lose that hunger for new experiences that drives the need to travel.
'lucky' those innocent tourists got murdered so you could have a cheap holiday.
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 10:49 am
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

[QUOTE=DadAgain;


As luck would have it Egyptian terrorists stuck out and gunned down a bunch of tourists in Luxor just before xmas and the bottom fell out of prices of flights to Egypt! I announced I was going and to my surprise I soon had a gang of 7 friends also keen to escape the xmas madness and go somewhere different. It was a tough holiday - too many people with different ideas of what 'the right thing to do' was. But in the end everyone had a fascinating experience and a memorable xmas and new year.
[/QUOTE]

We flew to Egypt (planned holiday) on Boxing Day that year!!
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 10:50 am
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by Dreamy View Post

(Emma, this is what you call a 'pontificating waffle'... although some of it is even relevant to the OP )

(Oh, and Dorothy/MP/Seasider, I'm really looking forward to the next instalment of 'The Girls Go Wild in Sydney')
I bow to your superior knowledge!
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 5:21 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

My wife and I met at a youth hostel and travelled around the Middle East and Eastern Europe for the next eight months. It's all too long ago now to interest anybody here in this Forum - although any parents who visited those areas might identify with some of my stories, as briefly reported. Jon, you might try to persuade your parents to write a bit about their adventures - for the benefit of their grandchildren, if not for themselves!

I've had fun remembering my old travels, and one day my grandchildren will get a kick out of my blog-posts. I hope. I've identified my travel-stories in my blog-archives with the letter T. T1 was the first, posted in December 2011 - crossing the Berlin Wall at the wrong place; T2 was meeting up with my wife in Greece. (I had a car and she was hitching; what can you do?)

Jon's parents might like T4, T6, T9 and T11, which are about Eastern Europe in the Communist days. DadAgain might get a smile out of my report of the crime (yes, it really was on the books) of "aiding and abetting adultery" in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) when it was under British/French control; that's a posting from last November, but not one of the T-series.

Asher, your ancestral uncle must have been a bad hat. Most of the convicts sent to Tasmania were sent there from convict settlements on the mainland, for misbehaving! Did you ever make contact with his descendants?
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Old Mar 19th 2013, 7:47 pm
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Default Re: Travel Bug...

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
My wife and I met at a youth hostel and travelled around the Middle East and Eastern Europe for the next eight months. It's all too long ago now to interest anybody here in this Forum - although any parents who visited those areas might identify with some of my stories, as briefly reported. Jon, you might try to persuade your parents to write a bit about their adventures - for the benefit of their grandchildren, if not for themselves!

I've had fun remembering my old travels, and one day my grandchildren will get a kick out of my blog-posts. I hope. I've identified my travel-stories in my blog-archives with the letter T. T1 was the first, posted in December 2011 - crossing the Berlin Wall at the wrong place; T2 was meeting up with my wife in Greece. (I had a car and she was hitching; what can you do?)

Jon's parents might like T4, T6, T9 and T11, which are about Eastern Europe in the Communist days. DadAgain might get a smile out of my report of the crime (yes, it really was on the books) of "aiding and abetting adultery" in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) when it was under British/French control; that's a posting from last November, but not one of the T-series.

Asher, your ancestral uncle must have been a bad hat. Most of the convicts sent to Tasmania were sent there from convict settlements on the mainland, for misbehaving! Did you ever make contact with his descendants?
He was a drunken Irish murderer who left a wife and 6 kids in the workhouse. Apparently he had a wicked temper when drunk he killed his landlord. His Australian descendants went to South Africa and we are in touch. His brother my many greats was only an embezzler
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