Police-Canada

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  • Most provincial and city police forces in Canada accept only Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) accepts only Canadian citizens.
  • The Calgary Police Force (CPS) and Edmonton Police Force (EPS) were the only police forces in Canada that were actively recruiting British police officers during 2007-2009.
  • The CPS and EPS were assisting British police officers to apply through Alberta's Provincial Nominee Program, which offers a fast track to permanent residence status. However this is on hold indefinitely due mainly to budget considerations. Therefore the following comments are to be used for information only at this time:
  • Spouse and children, are included in the program and will receive permanent resident status also if the officer is successful.
  • In order to join either of these police forces, the British police officer has to travel to the relevant city (Calgary or Edmonton) at his/her own expense for 7 to 10 days of testing. The tests are comprised of:
    • APCAT/CAAT written testing
    • Panel & Personal Disclosure Form Interviews
    • PARE physical, including VO2 max.
    • Polygraph exam
    • Psychological exam
  • The officer must provide their own first aid certificate, including CPR qualification.
  • Laser eyesight correction surgery is accepted.
  • The officer then returns to the UK to wait for the results of the evaluation.
  • Whilst in the UK, the relevent agency conducts background checks with persons nominated by the applicant. These are typically not relatives, but professional colleagues and friends the officer has known for some time. The check consists of telephoning the referee and interviewing them for upto 30mins on the character of the officer.
  • If the officer is accepted, he/she has to relocate to Calgary or Edmonton and go through the same 6-month training program that local, fresh recruits have to go through. However, this has recently (2008) been under review. The regular 'long' course is currently 19 (21 weeks EPS) weeks. As at Feb 09, CPS have now successfully completed two 'Experienced Officer Courses' (10 weeks), with two more scheduled for April and September 2009.
  • When the British police officer does the training program, he/she still may be on a temporary work permit, waiting for his/her permanent residence application via the Provincial Nominee Program to be processed.
  • The British police officer has to receive permanent residence status before he/she can be sworn in as a member of the Calgary or Edmonton Police Service.
  • The ex-British police officer will receive recognition for prior experience, and will be remunerated accordingly from the first date of employment. With five or more years service in a UK service, an ex-British officer may start at First Class Constable pay (and, for example, for CPS from Jan 08 this is just over $75,300 per annum).
  • You can expect the process, counting from the time that you submit your application to the time that you receive permanent residence status and are sworn in as a full member of the Calgary or Edmonton Police Service, to take at least a year.
  • However, this compares very favourably with the 5-year waiting time if you apply for permanent residence via the skilled worker route.

Those people who are not currently police officers in the UK may also apply under the PNP. It is understood that, for example, CPS only need to fill their vacancies with suitable applicants - they do not necessarily have to be current UK officers. However, bare in mind that if successful, the recruit would start at 5th class constable wage like all their new Canadian colleagues.

NB - As of 1st April 2008 - Calgary Police have amended their recruitment procedures for UK officers. The CPS are going to try and target more Canadians to fill vacancies - the UK officer recruitment campaign was apparently very successful, and there are currently over 130 applications still being processed.

Do not complete the full application process (available from their website). Send in your resume and a cover letter. If your details and career history are of interest to CPS, they will invite you to complete the application forms. You will then be allocated a File Manager who will direct procedures from there.

It is not clear whether the PNP is being suspended, or just slowed down. You can still apply via this route, but it may now take longer than the year's timescale targetted during 2007/early 2008.

NB - As of Jan 2009 - Calgary Police have recently contacted many of the UK-based officers who submitted resumes in the past year. They have selected those of interest to them and are inviting those people to now submit full applications.

Those people still interested in Calgary should submit their resume.


  • The British Expats website has a Police forum where you can find out more details.