Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > USA
Reload this Page >

US Education system!

US Education system!

Old Sep 8th 2014, 12:01 pm
  #16  
Professional Cat herder
 
Zoe Bell's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: TORONTO- yay!!!
Posts: 5,689
Zoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond reputeZoe Bell has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: US Education system!

The IB Diploma is a two year course.
The IB programme itself can be started in JK ( primary years program) followed by the middle years programme
There are also subject specific certificates that can be taken in place of the entire diploma.
Zoe Bell is offline  
Old Sep 8th 2014, 2:51 pm
  #17  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: Maryland (via Belfast, Manchester, Toronto and London)
Posts: 4,784
MarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond reputeMarylandNed has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: US Education system!

Originally Posted by Joandripple View Post
Thank you for that, but I suppose, what I am say is, are there any import exams that students take at the age for 16 (here in the UK 16 year olds take GCSE's). Then they have a choice to take 'A' levels, then go on to university. Or look for a job!
As others have said, the US system is different. US colleges look at a variety of factors when assessing admission applications. This is nowhere near an exhaustive list:

- High school course load, grades and GPA (Grade Point Average)
- Letters of recommendation from high school counselors and teachers
- Standardized test scores (SAT and/or ACT)
- The student's application essay(s)
- Extracurricular activities (sports, music, etc)
- Race or ethnicity (for purposes of diversity)
- Student's geographic location (for purposes of diversity; to satisfy legal requirements on number of "in state" versus "out of state" students)
- Gender
- Whether the student is the first in their family (including parents) to attend college

High school students can even take college level courses (e.g. AP = Advanced Placement) and transfer those credits to college.

So it's a lot more complex than just looking at grades and test scores. Grades and test scores are obviously important but they are by no means the only factors. I have 2 kids in college and I know for a fact that kids with better grades & test scores are often rejected in favor of kids with weaker grades & test scores because of other factors such as those mentioned above.

Last edited by MarylandNed; Sep 8th 2014 at 2:53 pm.
MarylandNed is offline  
Old Sep 8th 2014, 5:03 pm
  #18  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Posts: 4,901
md95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond reputemd95065 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: US Education system!

Originally Posted by MarylandNed View Post
As others have said, the US system is different. US colleges look at a variety of factors when assessing admission applications. This is nowhere near an exhaustive list:

[ ... ]

- Whether the student is the first in their family (including parents) to attend college

[ ... ]
... and, of course, (not that it will help the OP) how many generations of the prospective student's family have attended the college and just how much money they have donated to it recently ...
md95065 is offline  
Old Oct 25th 2014, 6:02 am
  #19  
British Expat in Texas
 
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 13
Kintsukuroi is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: US Education system!

I am a British expat and have lived in Texas for the last 13 years. I left school in the UK at 16 after completing my GCSEs. When I applied to college here in Texas I had to have my GCSEs evaluated by an evaluating agency and they were evaluated at the equivalent of a US high school diploma (my GCSEs were nothing special - 1 B, 6 Cs and the rest lower grades). I also had to take the ACT (Texas colleges generally prefer the ACT over the SAT). Texas is also an awesome homeschooling state as well as allows dual enrollment of community college and high school. The US and UK school systems are completely different so I tell you the above things for a reason. What I would do with your daughter is either homeschool her and then have her take CLEPs (college level subject specific exams) to gain college credit while doing homeschool "high school" or look for an early college high school. In early college high schools students pursue an Associate's degree while attending high school so when they graduate at the end of grade 12 they graduate with a high school diploma *and* an Associate's degree. I'm sure a high school would transfer in credit from the GCSEs for at least grades 9 and 10.
Kintsukuroi is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.