Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > USA
Reload this Page >

US Driving licence

US Driving licence

Old Dec 31st 2001, 4:28 pm
  #1  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 29
gabbleg is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

Hi..
I have just relocated to the USA (florida) and want to obtain a US Driving licence. Someone told me that it was better to apply for one within 30 days of arrival. Is this true, and if it is, why??? Any help is much appreciated.

gabbleg is offline  
Old Dec 31st 2001, 7:27 pm
  #2  
licrimlawyer
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    >
    >
In the US, every individual state is a soverign entity. As a result, if you become a
resident of that state, you must obtain a driver's license from the state. The fact
that you are coming from the UK doesn't really matter, it is the fact that you are
relocating to Florida. (I currently live in NY. If I relocate to FLA, I, too, will be
required to get a FLA driver's license.)

Finally, bear in mind that every state will have a slightly different law regarding
how long a new arrival has to obtain a driver's license. It may be that Florida law
says you must obtain a Florida license within 30 days of establishing residency
there. Can you fudge it be a few weeks, perhaps a few months? Of course you can. But,
don't push
it. If you get stopped by a cop, or, God forbid, have an accident, someone might
start asking nasty questions. But, if you are in the process of getting a
driver's license they might overlook the fact that you were a bit late.

BTW, make sure you stay to the RIGHT!
 
Old Dec 31st 2001, 7:33 pm
  #3  
Ken
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

gabbleg <[email protected]> wrote in news:3c30b5cb$1 @usenetgateway.com:
    >
    >
    >

In the USA, the state governments issue drivers licenses. They usually have some
maximum time requirement for you to apply for a license after establishing residency,
i.e., it may be illegal for you to use a foreign drivers license after living in the
state for 30 days. Contact your state government (department of motor vehicles, etc.)
for details.

Ken
 
Old Dec 31st 2001, 8:40 pm
  #4  
Trevor Galvin
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If you are a member of the AA (not alcoholics anonymous) I'd visit your local AAA
office when you arrive in Florida. They can give you the free booklet about 'rules of
the road' to help you with your test. At some point you'll have to visit one of our
government offices to apply for a license (DMV Dept of motor vehicles) and the 30 day
grace period sounds about right. Check with local people to see if you can make an
appointment like you can here in Calif. Walk-ins here suffer a MINIMUM 1 hour wait.
As with any U.S Govt. office the key is to take some interesting reading material.

    >
[usenetquote2]>> Hi.. I have just relocated to the USA (florida) and want to obtain a US Driving[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>> licence. Someone told me that it was better to apply for one within 30 days of[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>> arrival. Is this true, and if it is, why??? Any help is much appreciated.[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
 
Old Dec 31st 2001, 10:03 pm
  #5  
Evelyn C. Leeper
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

gabbleg wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >

Go to http://www.hsmv.state.fl.us/html/dlnew.html for detals on Florida drivers
licenses. Basically, you have thirty days after you have become a resident.

--
Evelyn C. Leeper http://www.geocities.com/evelynleeper "A free society is one where
it is safe to be unpopular." --Adlai Stevenson
 
Old Dec 31st 2001, 10:34 pm
  #6  
Lawrence Hughes
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

No, it is not true that one is required to obtain a driver's license from a state to
which one has moved. I have lived in the State of New York continuously for over
fifteen years without ever having obtained a driving license from this state.

Only if someone wants to operate a motor vehicle must that individual receive a
license to operate it (in which case the general rule is that a license from another
jurisdication may be used by a new resident for 30 days from when that person entered
the state). But any requirement that one "must" obtain a license--even with all the
current security hysteria and debate about uniform national identity cards, and even
with the popular opinion of many motorists that one cannot be a "real American"
without a license to propel two tons of metal at high speed through urban
environments--is simply untrue.
 
Old Dec 31st 2001, 10:49 pm
  #7  
David Hatunen
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

[usenetquote2]>>In the US, every individual state is a soverign entity. As a result, if you become[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>a resident of that state, you must obtain a driver's license from the state. The[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>fact that you are coming from the UK doesn't really matter, it is the fact that you[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>are relocating to Florida. (I currently live in NY. If I relocate to FLA, I, too,[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>will be required to get a FLA driver's license.)[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

I think it can be pretty well presumed that most people are aware that one gets a
drivers license in order to drive.

In most states, though, a drivers license serves as a form of identity for a number
of useful tasks, such as buying alcoholic beverages and cashing a check. Or even as
ID when boarding an airplane. To this end, most states issue a drivers license-like
card for those who don't need or want a drivers license.

As to the two tons of metal at high speed, you need a drivers license in many or most
states for considerably lighter vehicles as well, including motorcycles and motorized
scooters. And electric vehicles operated on a public street or highway. Your sarcasm
is unwarranted.

********** DAVE HATUNEN ([email protected]) ***********
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow * ******* My typos are
intentional copyright traps ******
 
Old Dec 31st 2001, 11:35 pm
  #8  
Lt Col (Retd)
 
Pulaski's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: Dixie, ex UK
Posts: 47,759
Pulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond reputePulaski has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Originally posted by gabbleg
Hi..
I have just relocated to the USA (florida) and want to obtain a US Driving licence. Someone told me that it was better to apply for one within 30 days of arrival. Is this true, and if it is, why??? Any help is much appreciated.

So long as you can get an appointment for the road test (look for a test centre in a rural area if there is a long wait where you live) you should have no problem getting a licence within 30 days. The tests here are embarassing. I spent 7 minutes drving round a housing estate where the speed limits were 15 or 25 mph, did a three point turn, a parallel park, a left turn onto a main road (three hundred yards at 35 mph, and Bob's your uncle! That was in New York, and I hear the test is easier in Florida.

I'd wish you good luck, but you won't need it!
Pulaski is offline  
Old Jan 1st 2002, 1:18 am
  #9  
John Chapman
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

When I re-located from Alberta to BC, if I hadn't obtained a BC license within 30
days, I would have had to take a new driving test, both written and oral. This is
another good reason to apply asap. JOHN

    >
    >
    >
[usenetquote2]> >Hi.. I have just relocated to the USA (florida) and want to obtain a US Driving[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >licence. Someone told me that it was better to apply for one within 30 days of[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >arrival. Is this true, and if it is, why??? Any help is much appreciated.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >--[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
 
Old Jan 1st 2002, 3:08 am
  #10  
Ken
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

John Chapman <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >

If you move from one US state to another, often you do not have to take the driving
road test again (depends on the state). If you move to the US from another country,
you probably always need to take the road test again.

Ken
 
Old Jan 1st 2002, 3:38 am
  #11  
licrimlawyer
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

[usenetquote2]>>In the US, every individual state is a soverign entity. As a result, if you become[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>a resident of that state, you must obtain a driver's license from the state. The[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>fact that you are coming from the UK doesn't really matter, it is the fact that you[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>are relocating to Florida. (I currently live in NY. If I relocate to FLA, I, too,[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>will be required to get a FLA driver's license.)[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
YO, wiseass, the person asked about a driver's license. Ergo, I responded with
that in mind.

Having said that, I will agree that there is no legal requirement that one carry any
type of identification. However, let me suggest that, in this day and age, it is
probably prudent to be able to prove who you are, and to be able to do it quickly.

Among other things, and this is prior to September 11, 2001, anyone questioned by a
police officer in the City of New York was asked to provide some ID. If you did not
have some documentary proof (e.g. a driver's license) on your person the nice
policeman would take you to the stationhouse unttil they could determine exactly who
you were and that there were no arrest warrants, or similar process, lodged against
you. Bear in mind that this was the doing of Rudolph William Giuliani, who has
recently been elevated to sainthood by the media.

Now, you cn scream all you want about constitutional rights--or constitutional lefts
for all I care. If you want to sue, you can pay me about 100 grand up front and I'll
take your case. No attorney with half a brain would take it on a contingency basis.
(One must win to collect a contingent fee.)

So, if you are smart, you get appropriate ID. If you want to drive a car, you make
sure that you have complied with all the local statutes regarding licensing,
insurance, etc.
 
Old Jan 1st 2002, 8:57 am
  #12  
Barbara Vaughan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ken wrote:
    >
    >
[usenetquote2]> > When I re-located from Alberta to BC, if I hadn't obtained a BC license within 30[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > days, I would have had to take a new driving test, both written and oral. This is[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > another good reason to apply asap. JOHN[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >

In New Jersey, a friend with an Italian drivers license was required to take only the
written test.

Barbara
 
Old Jan 1st 2002, 9:00 am
  #13  
Barbara Vaughan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ken wrote:
    >
    >
[usenetquote2]> > Hi.. I have just relocated to the USA (florida) and want to obtain a US Driving[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > licence. Someone told me that it was better to apply for one within 30 days of[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > arrival. Is this true, and if it is, why??? Any help is much appreciated.[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

Many people who relocate to the US have temporary student or work visas, therefore
have not technically established US residency. These people can usually drive with
their European licenses while they are in the US. However, as others have pointed
out, the laws vary from state to state.

Barbara
 
Old Jan 1st 2002, 6:58 pm
  #14  
Greg Pacek - Crazyon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

in news:3c30b5cb$1
[usenetquote2]> > @usenetgateway.com:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > > Hi.. I have just relocated to the USA (florida) and want to obtain a US Driving[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > > licence. Someone told me that it was better to apply for one within 30 days of[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > > arrival. Is this true, and if it is, why??? Any help is much appreciated.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > In the USA, the state governments issue drivers licenses. They usually have some[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > maximum time requirement for you to apply for a license after establishing[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > residency, i.e., it may be illegal for you to use a foreign drivers license after[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > living in the state for 30 days. Contact your state government (department of[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > motor vehicles, etc.) for details.[/usenetquote2]
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

Actually, I knew someone from the UK who worked in Florida for 6 months. Though the
law was somewhat vague (as far as his temporary resident status), he went and got his
Florida license anyway. He claimed it to be quite easy, although he did indeed have
to take both written and road tests. So a new resident moving to Florida from outside
US will certainly have to take both knowledge test ("written", but maybe given by
computer) and a road test. The knowledge test will be first. You are given plenty of
tries to take each, but usually you can't try more than once on the same day.
Unfortunately, I do not know the time requirement (within 30-60 days, usually), but
it's highly likely you can find this info on the official state web site. Most state
web sites answer to the format http://www.state.fl.us (replace the "fl" with the
appropriate state abbreviation for other states). And most state sites have sections
for people who have recently moved there. This should give you plenty of info
regarding the rules for the license and how to get it, as well as other useful info
for a new resident.

(Note in most if not all states you can be issued a state photo ID card instead of
driver's license identifying you as a resident of that state. This is really only
useful if you intend not to drive at all. Normally these are issued through the same
channels as the driver's license. While no doubt a new resident would have other
photo ID from the US and previous country, at times it can be useful to be identified
down to the state rather than a national level ID.)

--
    >
    >
cannot say."
 
Old Jan 2nd 2002, 3:00 am
  #15  
Matt Conrad
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

    >
    >

Just to nitpick a bit... in Maine, one need not be a resident in order to get a state
ID card. All you need is a mailing address in the state, and you can get an ID even
if you hold a driver's license from another state. I think the idea is to accommodate
out-of-staters who have vacation property in Maine.

Until fairly recently, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles issued the cards on the spot, so
I suppose one could have even used the address of a hotel in Maine where he/she was
staying. However, they're now issuing the cards by mail and sending them to the
address on the ID card. Mine took about 10 days to arrive (it was mailed from
Minnesota).

However, I do think that most (if not all) other states require you to be a resident
in order to get an ID card.

Matt
 

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.