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-   -   US College versus UK University (https://britishexpats.com/forum/usa-57/us-college-versus-uk-university-877084/)

newadventure May 6th 2016 5:23 pm

US College versus UK University
 
We have 3 kids one of whom is in 9th grade at high school.

We have been over here 4 years and will hopefully hear that our green card application has been approved at the end of this year. Now we have decided to settle here my eldest (age 14) would like to study in the UK for her undergraduate course. Leaving aside the getting into Uni - she is taking AP courses and I think I am top of this bit of info around how tricky it is to get in - she would be treated as an international student which is cost prohibitive for us compared to in state college here. Have any of you got experience of kids going back to the UK to study on scholarships. Any thoughts on bringing the cost down or on European Universities for that matter.

Many thanks

Bob May 6th 2016 9:15 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 
Other countries in the EU are sometimes free, or much reduced.

Alternative would be not to get greencards and blag that this is a temporary work assignment, which is doable if it is a company transfer. Kid moves to the UK for the 3 years.

Cost of uni as a international student, isn't necessarily all that much more expensive than home UK rates, but you do have the issue of not being able to get LEA student loans and having to pay up front instead of after earning x amount on graduation.

sir_eccles May 6th 2016 9:30 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 
If you are likely to be getting greencards then it sounds like your intention is to stick around the US for a while. In my opinion your kids would be better served in the US employment market by having US degrees.

MarylandNed May 6th 2016 10:04 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by sir_eccles (Post 11941601)
If you are likely to be getting greencards then it sounds like your intention is to stick around the US for a while. In my opinion your kids would be better served in the US employment market by having US degrees.

I don't agree with that statement. My degree is from the UK and it didn't hinder me at all in terms of finding employment in the US. My daughter is about to graduate from a Canadian university.

In today's global economy, many employers are looking for graduates who have lived in another country or speak another language. Students who study at foreign universities are usually more globally aware and also more independent than US students (e.g. European universities don't mollycoddle students through the process like they do in the US). In addition, European tuition fees are usually lower and so a bachelor's degree can be obtained in less time saving even more money.

Bob May 6th 2016 10:13 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by MarylandNed (Post 11941622)
I don't agree with that statement. My degree is from the UK and it didn't hinder me at all in terms of finding employment in the US. My daughter is about to graduate from a Canadian university.

In today's global economy, many employers are looking for graduates who have lived in another country or speak another language. ...

True.

But also, plenty of folks don't give any value to the unknown of foreign institutes. So going to a well respected university v a shit one, makes no difference unless it's OxBridge. So you might as well have gone to the local community school.

All this does depend on the type of work you'll be looking for though.

Owen778 May 6th 2016 10:49 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by MarylandNed (Post 11941622)
I don't agree with that statement. My degree is from the UK and it didn't hinder me at all in terms of finding employment in the US. My daughter is about to graduate from a Canadian university.

In today's global economy, many employers are looking for graduates who have lived in another country or speak another language. Students who study at foreign universities are usually more globally aware and also more independent than US students (e.g. European universities don't mollycoddle students through the process like they do in the US). In addition, European tuition fees are usually lower and so a bachelor's degree can be obtained in less time saving even more money.

It depends. Certainly there are advantages to studying abroad, but in any sector where graduate recruitment is done through campus visits, attending a college in the US that is highly ranked for your subject of study is a really big advantage.

Asg123 May 7th 2016 12:12 am

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by Bob (Post 11941631)
True.

But also, plenty of folks don't give any value to the unknown of foreign institutes. So going to a well respected university v a shit one, makes no difference unless it's OxBridge. So you might as well have gone to the local community school.

All this does depend on the type of work you'll be looking for though.


Originally Posted by Owen778 (Post 11941658)
It depends. Certainly there are advantages to studying abroad, but in any sector where graduate recruitment is done through campus visits, attending a college in the US that is highly ranked for your subject of study is a really big advantage.


Yes, true.

One might also add another advantage: networking.

mrken30 May 7th 2016 12:39 am

Re: US College versus UK University
 
It might be too late to start a 529 college plan, but it may save you some money on US school fees.

petitefrancaise May 7th 2016 3:35 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 
We went through this 2 years ago and are still somewhat in the middle of it all for the next child.

If you get permanent resident status you will be able to apply for financial aid from the US college for your daughter and if she 's bright, doing the right course at the right college this could be a decent sum. She'll be able to apply for internships during the summer somewhat helped by her college. If she intends to stay in the US afterwards then this may be her best choice. This was the decision we arrived at with our eldest. If you're worried about costs then it is perfectly acceptable to spend the first 2 years at a community college and then transfer into the state university.

Since we are permanent residents and our middle child doesn't really see his future in the USA, he is applying to EU universities. He is bi-lingual english french but doesn't want to study in France. We have searched out universities which offer the course he wants in English and it turns out that the better ones do this so we didn't have to compromise on quality of the course. Most EU universities are very reasonable in costs, some are free and you will have living costs and flights home to pay for.

The UK wasn't really an option for my son, he hasn't lived in the UK so although his passport says British he feels more french/european. Given his options in Europe, he didn't feel that the cost of an oxbridge/russell group university was worth it. We would be paying international fees in the UK as a previous poster said, upfront too.

If your daughter wants to go back to the UK to study there aren't any scholarships that I'm aware of. Your best bet would be to postpone the green card application and get her through the admissions as "ordinarily resident in the UK" . But then you have the other kids to think about too because the choices you make now will affect them.

sir_eccles May 7th 2016 4:42 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by Asg123 (Post 11941714)
Yes, true.

One might also add another advantage: networking.

This and also internships are a very big part of the career ladder these days.

malch May 7th 2016 7:23 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by mrken30 (Post 11941729)
It might be too late to start a 529 college plan, but it may save you some money on US school fees.

It really is too late and 529 plans are rubbish, IMO.

1. They mainly come with limited investment choices and high management fees.


2. They immediately reduce your eligibility for financial aid.

We're using a Roth IRA as an instrument to save for our youngest's college education and it has numerous advantages over a 529. However, you would need to evaluate this carefully in the context of your specific situation since there are a lot of issues and variables to consider.

Vimto May 7th 2016 8:00 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 
Some recent articles on costs between the 2 countries, what I find eye watering is the cost in the UK for International students for tuition only
£9000 as a UK resident versus UK£20,700 (US$30,410) for International students



Tuition fees: Is England more expensive than US? - BBC News


https://www.tremr.com/brennabrandes/...-or-not-to-pay


Tuition Fees at the World’s Top Universities | Top Universities

newadventure May 7th 2016 8:03 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 
Thanks for the articles very helpful.

sparkleandglitter May 9th 2016 8:02 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 
Another thing to consider is the type of study and assessment they want - many US students who have tried the UK system complain about the weight placed on one or two forms of assessment (e.g. end of term exam or 1 essay) or find that having to pick a major up front is stifling.
I've heard that some UK unis are now introducing liberal arts degrees, which is an interesting development. If you're focused and want to study just one thing, the UK system can be great, but if you have a lot of interests and love to learn about different things, and try a bit of everything, the US universities might be a better fit to find your passion along the way.
Hope this helps (UK educated Brit now working in US higher ed)

steveq May 9th 2016 10:47 pm

Re: US College versus UK University
 

Originally Posted by sparkleandglitter (Post 11943743)
Another thing to consider is the type of study and assessment they want - many US students who have tried the UK system complain about the weight placed on one or two forms of assessment (e.g. end of term exam or 1 essay) or find that having to pick a major up front is stifling.

Then again, when you have always known what you want to do, dicking around with minor subjects is just a waste of time, effort, money, and detracts from what you need/want to study instead.


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