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US Citizen in UK divorcing UK Wife .... Information please

US Citizen in UK divorcing UK Wife .... Information please

Old Feb 9th 2002, 12:19 am
  #1  
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WillieJack is an unknown quantity at this point
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Hi There,

Having surfed around for hours looking for an answer to the following question, I stumbled across this forum... I hope you may be able to help or point me in the right direction.

I have been living in the UK for the past 10 years with my UK wife. We have 1 child who is a dual citizen at the moment... he is 13.

I have had a work visa and National Insurance number since arriving in the UK. My wife and I wish to divorce and I would like to stay in the UK for my sons sake. I am working in the catering industry and would like to continue doing so, however I am worried that my visa will not be extended as I will no longer be married to a UK citizen... Can anyone shed some light on this situation or point me in the right direction... Will I be able to renew my visa through my son??? Your help is much appreciated.

Regards

Bill
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Old Feb 9th 2002, 3:02 pm
  #2  
Stephen Gallagher
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Why do you say that your child is a dual citizen at the moment? Does he plan on
giving up one of his citizenships?
 
Old Feb 9th 2002, 6:45 pm
  #3  
Michael Voight
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Stephen Gallagher wrote:
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[usenetquote2]> > Having surfed around for hours looking for an answer to the following question, I[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > stumbled across this forum... I hope you may be able to help or point me in the[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > right direction.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > I have been living in the UK for the past 10 years with my UK wife. We have 1[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > child who is a dual citizen at the moment... he is 13.[/usenetquote2]
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I take it he was a dual citizen at birth. Why would he have to give up one
citizenship?

Michael
 
Old Feb 10th 2002, 10:10 am
  #4  
Gerhard Fiedler
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[usenetquote2]>> > I have been living in the UK for the past 10 years with my UK wife. We have 1[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>> > child who is a dual citizen at the moment... he is 13.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>>[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>> Why do you say that your child is a dual citizen at the moment? Does he plan on[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]>> giving up one of his citizenships?[/usenetquote2]
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One reason might be draft or military registration. It seems that at the moment this
is not a problem with the USA, but this may change. I've known such "double citizens
by birth" who at 18 chose to abandon one of their citizenships, because they didn't
want to fulfill the draft requirements for two countries.
 
Old Feb 10th 2002, 2:56 pm
  #5  
Stephen Gallagher
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Gerhard Fiedler <[email protected]>

[usenetquote2]> >Stephen Gallagher wrote:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >> > I have been living in the UK for the past 10 years with my UK wife. We have 1[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >> > child who is a dual citizen at the moment... he is 13.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >>[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >> Why do you say that your child is a dual citizen at the moment? Does he plan on[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >> giving up one of his citizenships?[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >I take it he was a dual citizen at birth. Why would he have to give up one[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >citizenship?[/usenetquote2]
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True. The UK has no draft or other military obligation at this time. The US does have
a requirement for males to register for Selective Service when they reach age
eighteen, but again, there's no active draft or obligatory military service in the US
at this time, either.
 
Old Feb 10th 2002, 3:56 pm
  #6  
Ellie
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Hi Bill,

You may find it helpful to visit the following site: http://www.americanexpats.co.uk
As the name suggests, it's a site for American Ex-Pats living in the UK and they have
an excellent forum with an immigration section where you may find an answer to your
query. Good luck
 
Old Feb 14th 2002, 5:49 am
  #7  
Gail
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Default Re: US Citizen in UK divorcing UK Wife .... Information please

Hi Bill, I hope this helps you a bit. I was previously married to a foreign citizen
we were married in his country. I sponsored him to come to the UK as my husband,
which went ALOT smoother, cheaper and easier than this UK to US stuff. Anyway the
inevitable happend and we divorced after 4 years. He had permanent leave to remain in
the UK, once we seperated he started to claim social security which no one in my
family has ever done before, and other things which I don't agree with but feel
responsible for because he was able to go to the UK purely because of me. I digress
sorry. Anyway the day he was able to apply for UK citizenship he did, it was granted
to him without a second thought by the authorities. So I am sure it will not be a
problem for you at all. Then again you don't need it to stay in the UK, you should
have permanent leave to remain or something similar in your passport. Unless you want
to leave for a year and a day, I think they revoke it then. I can't really remember
how long it is now. I have put it all behind me and try not to think about it.
 

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