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Jackie3 Jun 10th 2016 11:08 am

UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Hi,
I am a UK trained doctor looking at moving back to US- (US citizen) I grew up in Texas but went to medical school in England and have been working here for the last 6 years.
Are there any other UK trained doctors around that I could run a couple of questions by?
Thank you in advance!

jtlc2345 Jun 10th 2016 12:05 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
I can try to help out.

Jonathan

Jackie3 Jun 10th 2016 12:18 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Thanks! It is around residency and retraining, for Texas licensure I need 2 years of approved residency training, but all the programmes are 3/4 years, I was wondering if anyone had experience with this, as I would rather not have to complete an extra few years if avoidable.

jtlc2345 Jun 10th 2016 12:24 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
I'm in New York, so unfortunately do not know about the specifics of Texas licensing. May be worth contacting the Texas Medical Board directly with details of all your prior experience and see what they say, however, there may not be a way around their requirements.

Jonathan

Jackie3 Jun 10th 2016 12:44 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Thank you, I appreciate your reply! I'll speak to someone at the Texas Medical Board and see if they have any insight.
Did you do your training in UK?

jtlc2345 Jun 10th 2016 1:28 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
No problem. I worked for three years in the UK before moving to the US for residency.

Jonathan

Jackie3 Jun 10th 2016 1:52 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Did you find a big difference?! I imagine it is a big change, I'm spending some time with a family practitioner there this summer to see how it is!

jtlc2345 Jun 10th 2016 8:22 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
The medicine is still the same. Main difference I found is that drug names and units for certain values e.g. glucose, creatinine are different so take time to adjust to. But overall the adjustment isn't too bad.

Jonathan

Ozzidoc Jun 11th 2016 4:25 am

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 

Originally Posted by Jackie3 (Post 11969805)
Thanks! It is around residency and retraining, for Texas licensure I need 2 years of approved residency training, but all the programmes are 3/4 years, I was wondering if anyone had experience with this, as I would rather not have to complete an extra few years if avoidable.

Usually, as in 99% of the time, you need to start over here in the USA. Some hospitals in some states may recognize prior training, and give you a state license attached to that specific hospital only.

I know someone who was a surgical reg in the UK, obtained a fellowship at a place in Chicago and then after a couple of years doing that was admitted with advanced standing onto their residency program. He graduated from that residency and moved to another US state where he is now working as an attending.

If your intention is to relocate back to the USA, I would strongly suggest following the usual path here: apply for a residency program and see it through to the end.

The Texas two year thing means, in practical terms, you can moonlight (locum) after two years.

Jackie3 Jun 11th 2016 5:40 am

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Thank you! I don't want to be a long term locum, so a full residency makes sense. I suppose in the grand scheme of things 2yrs vs 3/4 yrs is nothing really!

Bob Jun 13th 2016 11:22 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Not that this really applies to the OP, but it's interesting to read from a UK perspective.

A friend of mine, had 7 odd years experience as a general surgeon in Japan, she said basically anything from the neck down to the hips. When she moved here, she had to start from scratch, even though she speaks English like a native and much of the training was in English.

She never bothered.

Retrained as a tax accountant type person in the end, after trying her hand as a realtor and hating it.

Though tbh, I don't think she needs to work, she was already independently wealthy and she utterly crushed her ex in alimony on their divorce, which also tbh, was a fair result. He put a capital D in the word, dick.

thinbrit Jun 14th 2016 12:07 am

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 

Originally Posted by Jackie3 (Post 11970458)
Thank you! I don't want to be a long term locum, so a full residency makes sense. I suppose in the grand scheme of things 2yrs vs 3/4 yrs is nothing really!

Do you have to go through a matching program like we have to do for veterinarians? Once a year everyone throws their hat in the ring and hopes they get what they were looking for.
That may impact when you can actually start work.
https://www.virmp.org

jtlc2345 Jun 14th 2016 1:14 am

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 

Originally Posted by thinbrit (Post 11972670)
Do you have to go through a matching program like we have to do for veterinarians? Once a year everyone throws their hat in the ring and hopes they get what they were looking for.
That may impact when you can actually start work.
https://www.virmp.org

There is a matching program - takes place once a year - starts in September with you finding out where you match in March, before you start in July.

Jonathan

Victorinox Jun 25th 2016 7:05 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
Depending on what stage of training you are at, a route into the system has been for foreigners to do a fellowship and then find a job at an academic center.

I went the full residency route, and am about half way through (11 years after graduating in the UK!), but in my current dept, up to 1/3 of the faculty are foreign-trained, and a lot did just a 1-year fellowship as their way in.

Good luck!

Jackie3 Jun 25th 2016 7:29 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 

Originally Posted by Victorinox (Post 11984424)
Depending on what stage of training you are at, a route into the system has been for foreigners to do a fellowship and then find a job at an academic center.

I went the full residency route, and am about half way through (11 years after graduating in the UK!), but in my current dept, up to 1/3 of the faculty are foreign-trained, and a lot did just a 1-year fellowship as their way in.

Good luck!

Thank you! I think I'm just gonna do the residency route as well.
My only concern is about years since graduation as lots of the programmes seem to have a limit to that. I've been working since graduation, no gaps, so wondering if the years since graduation are more to do with people who haven't been working?

Do you know where the best place to find information about the fellowship route would be?

Victorinox Jun 25th 2016 9:01 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 
The fellowship route is specialty-dependent. An example, ortho is insanely competitive, so unless youve won a nobel prize in your home country (hyberbole) it is very unusual to find foreign trained attendings in this specialty, whereas if you look the the UW anesthesia dept, you'll find a lot of them trained in the UK (anesthesia not as competitive), so it is more open to taking foreign grads. Also academics pays less than PP.


So information about fellowship route is dependent largely on your specialty.


It seems you're focussed on Texas. I dont know much about Texas but I've heard the TMB paperwork can be a hassle.


Also, they tend to like recent graduates, hence the limits you see; the dept I ended up in had a 4 or 5 year limit since graduation (it was about 10yrs since I'd graduated when I applied). It depends on meeting/knowing the right people, having faculty members advocating for you, being blessed/lucky in application, or having a compelling reason why they should take you over a fresh-minted graduate.

Jackie3 Jun 25th 2016 9:32 pm

Re: UK trained doctors in U.S.?
 

Originally Posted by Victorinox (Post 11984548)
The fellowship route is specialty-dependent. An example, ortho is insanely competitive, so unless youve won a nobel prize in your home country (hyberbole) it is very unusual to find foreign trained attendings in this specialty, whereas if you look the the UW anesthesia dept, you'll find a lot of them trained in the UK (anesthesia not as competitive), so it is more open to taking foreign grads. Also academics pays less than PP.


So information about fellowship route is dependent largely on your specialty.


It seems you're focussed on Texas. I dont know much about Texas but I've heard the TMB paperwork can be a hassle.


Also, they tend to like recent graduates, hence the limits you see; the dept I ended up in had a 4 or 5 year limit since graduation (it was about 10yrs since I'd graduated when I applied). It depends on meeting/knowing the right people, having faculty members advocating for you, being blessed/lucky in application, or having a compelling reason why they should take you over a fresh-minted graduate.

This is really helpful- thank you!
I am looking at psychiatry, so hopefully a less competitive specialty.
I'll do some research into fellowships, we are going over to Texas in August so I can hopefully make some leeway. Oklahoma is also an option, so will have a look into that!


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