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UK state pension and USA social security

UK state pension and USA social security

Old Jan 7th 2018, 8:15 am
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Exactly. I pay my Medicare Pt. B every month. Now, in my case, I spend maybe seven months a year in the UK and five months (or so) in the US. But even if I'd fully relocated to Britain, I think I'd keep on paying Pt. B, at least for a few years - in case I changed my mind and moved back to the US. Remember there's a penalty, for each year you're eligible and don't pay, there's a cumulative 10% increase in the Medicare Pt. B premium.
thanks for explanation.

the penalty is it due regardless of whether you take medicare or not , as opposed to taking it and letting it lapse for a while ?
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 5:04 pm
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by morpeth View Post
thanks for explanation.

the penalty is it due regardless of whether you take medicare or not , as opposed to taking it and letting it lapse for a while ?
If you don’t take up Medicare you don’t get assessed a penalty but if you later decide to sign up then it is more expensive. This is to penalize folks who don’t have Medicare because they are healthy and decide to go without and save paying the premiums then decide to take out Medicare when they do get sick.
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 5:07 pm
  #1473  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by morpeth View Post
thanks for explanation.

the penalty is it due regardless of whether you take medicare or not , as opposed to taking it and letting it lapse for a while ?
Good question, I should have explained it better. You only pay a penalty if, at some time in the future, you belatedly take up Medicare Pt. B. Example; you reach age 65. You don't want to pay a premium, so just take Medicare Pt. A. After a year, you change your mind, choose to sign up to Pt. B. You have to pay regular premium plus 10% - for life. Same if you let it lapse at any time, you pay the penalty if you take it up again. It's a cumulative ten percent per year that you didn't pay for.
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 5:38 pm
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Isn't the penalty on Part D as well?
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 5:56 pm
  #1475  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by lansbury View Post
Isn't the penalty on Part D as well?
Definitely.
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 6:02 pm
  #1476  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by lansbury View Post
Isn't the penalty on Part D as well?
Originally Posted by Nutmegger View Post
Definitely.
Yes but that's a bit more peripheral than Pt. B. For instance, I have a Medicare Advantage plan, $0 premium. Medicare Advantage covers Pt. D, I believe you can't have a Pt.D plan if you have Medicare Advantage (since it would be duplicative.) So no penalty applies if no Pt. D.
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 6:31 pm
  #1477  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Yes but that's a bit more peripheral than Pt. B. For instance, I have a Medicare Advantage plan, $0 premium. Medicare Advantage covers Pt. D, I believe you can't have a Pt.D plan if you have Medicare Advantage (since it would be duplicative.) So no penalty applies if no Pt. D.
It may be more peripheral these days with the increase in the utilization of advantage plans, but if the drugs aren’t covered in some way, a penalty will apply.
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 6:43 pm
  #1478  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by Nutmegger View Post
It may be more peripheral these days with the increase in the utilization of advantage plans, but if the drugs aren’t covered in some way, a penalty will apply.
Well that's certainly true. When I was choosing plans two or three years ago, I had little to go on - I wasn't then, and am not now, on any medications, so I had no real life scenarios to compare. To tell the truth, since achieving Medicare age, I haven't once been to the doctor (except in England, when I had a series of appointments with doctors and practice nurses welcoming me to the practice, but they were just to take my vitals and have a chat etc.)
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 7:19 pm
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Well that's certainly true. When I was choosing plans two or three years ago, I had little to go on - I wasn't then, and am not now, on any medications, so I had no real life scenarios to compare. To tell the truth, since achieving Medicare age, I haven't once been to the doctor (except in England, when I had a series of appointments with doctors and practice nurses welcoming me to the practice, but they were just to take my vitals and have a chat etc.)
Same with me re medications. When I tried to use the online Medicare drug plan comparison tool and entered “no drugs,” it would just stop short and tell me to try again when I was ready to enter what medication I was taking!
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Old Jan 7th 2018, 10:03 pm
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Yes but that's a bit more peripheral than Pt. B. For instance, I have a Medicare Advantage plan, $0 premium. Medicare Advantage covers Pt. D, I believe you can't have a Pt.D plan if you have Medicare Advantage (since it would be duplicative.) So no penalty applies if no Pt. D.
Yes I have my part D cover by an Advantage plan. I wasn't sure if there was a penalty on part D if there was no cover at all, hence my question.
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Old Jan 8th 2018, 8:03 am
  #1481  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by lansbury View Post
Yes I have my part D cover by an Advantage plan. I wasn't sure if there was a penalty on part D if there was no cover at all, hence my question.
Exactly, I'm not sure. If in a few years I choose to upgrade and get a Medicare supplement plan plus a pt. D, would my prior coverage with Advantage mean no penalty for not having a pt. D previously?
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Old Jan 8th 2018, 9:40 am
  #1482  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Exactly, I'm not sure. If in a few years I choose to upgrade and get a Medicare supplement plan plus a pt. D, would my prior coverage with Advantage mean no penalty for not having a pt. D previously?
What are the costs you pay for each part ?
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Old Jan 8th 2018, 3:01 pm
  #1483  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Exactly, I'm not sure. If in a few years I choose to upgrade and get a Medicare supplement plan plus a pt. D, would my prior coverage with Advantage mean no penalty for not having a pt. D previously?

This appears to indicate that, as long as you have some kind of drug coverage, the penalty does not apply:

https://www.medicare.gov/part-d/cost...t-penalty.html
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Old Jan 8th 2018, 4:26 pm
  #1484  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by morpeth View Post
What are the costs you pay for each part ?
Pt. A - $0 (Because I've worked the requisite number of years.)
Pt. B - Was about $105 per month, not sure if it still is ...
Advantage Plan - $0 (and this includes drug coverage.)

Why is my Advantage plan $0, you may ask. The reason is that I have a high out-of-pocket, whereas if I relied on "traditional Medicare" (for exactly the same premium) the bills would be assigned on a different schedule.

Originally Posted by Nutmegger View Post
This appears to indicate that, as long as you have some kind of drug coverage, the penalty does not apply:

https://www.medicare.gov/part-d/cost...t-penalty.html
Thanks. I'd assumed that was the case, but wasn't sure ...
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Old Jan 8th 2018, 5:27 pm
  #1485  
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Default Re: UK state pension and USA social security

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Pt. A - $0 (Because I've worked the requisite number of years.)
Pt. B - Was about $105 per month, not sure if it still is ...
Advantage Plan - $0 (and this includes drug coverage.)

Why is my Advantage plan $0, you may ask. The reason is that I have a high out-of-pocket, whereas if I relied on "traditional Medicare" (for exactly the same premium) the bills would be assigned on a different schedule.



Thanks. I'd assumed that was the case, but wasn't sure ...
Thanks.

So if I understand it Medicare pays the cost for an operation ? So theoretically if there was a delay in getting a necessary NHS operation I could just get it done n the states ?

So Medicare is free ( if one worked log enough in USA which I did) but also the Advantage plan IF one has a high deductible ? Why did you choose the Advantage plan over the traditional Medicare ?

Which Medicare plan part pays for Doctors consultation ?
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