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ccalgreen May 16th 2012 2:58 am

Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 
I'm sure this question has been asked before, but I couldn't find it with a native or Google search, so if someone knows, please just post the link to the answered thread! :)

I'm going to be travelling to the UK for my sister's wedding with my American family (wife, son, mother- and father- in-law) - I'm a LPR, but haven't submitted my N-400 yet, so I still have a British passport.

I'm pretty sure that if it were me, my wife and my son travelling, we would be able to go through the UK Citizens line as travelling as a family. Does anyone know if my in-laws would also qualify as "family" to stay with us to get through passport and customs control?

Thanks!

Yorkieabroad May 16th 2012 3:09 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 
Whats your port of entry? I went thru the UK line with my in-laws with no problem at Heathrow (10+ years ago), but at Teesside, even when its just me (UKC) and the kids(USC) they always hold us till all the UKC's have gone thru before they'll even look at us.

RICH May 16th 2012 3:51 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 
With no knowledge of this, but applying common sense, the in-laws have to meet Non EU immigration procedures, as do the wife and kids. (presumably, visa waiver program).

Which line they are in?.... assuming they meet the criteria, the worst that can happen is they get sent to the back of the "right" line. But who said common sense is in charge.

ps. Customs has nothing to do with it - your concern is with immigration.

Bob May 16th 2012 3:59 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 
Depends how well you get on with them I suppose... :D

But anyway, it really does depend on the airport and how busy they are, so just ask when you get there.

RICH May 16th 2012 4:23 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 
pps. The 2 or 3 times I flew into London with my American girlfriend/fiance/ wife, she was through passport control/immigration faster than me, as the EU lines were always longer than the non EU lines. So I suppose consider all going non EU if you cannot be apart for an hour or so. The lines are not legal requirements, just herd management.

oxonlad May 16th 2012 1:42 pm

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by RICH (Post 10063335)
pps. The 2 or 3 times I flew into London with my American girlfriend/fiance/ wife, she was through passport control/immigration faster than me, as the EU lines were always longer than the non EU lines. So I suppose consider all going non EU if you cannot be apart for an hour or so. The lines are not legal requirements, just herd management.

I traveled with my nephew (who did not have a UK passport) last year, and we both went through the Non-EU line. If they don't have stamps in the EU line (for non-EU Passport holders), you might have to wait in line twice...

ccalgreen May 19th 2012 12:10 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 
Just to add some missing information, I'm landing at Heathrow. The last time my USC wife and I went, she went to the non-EU line, while I went through the UKC line. When I got to the desk, the officer said that we could have both gone through the UKC line, so I was just curious how broadly the UKBA interprets the definition of "family". I did wait an hour for her last time, but I heard it could be even worse nowadays.

RICH May 19th 2012 1:30 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by ccalgreen (Post 10070005)
Just to add some missing information, I'm landing at Heathrow. The last time my USC wife and I went, she went to the non-EU line, while I went through the UKC line. When I got to the desk, the officer said that we could have both gone through the UKC line, so I was just curious how broadly the UKBA interprets the definition of "family". I did wait an hour for her last time, but I heard it could be even worse nowadays.

This emphasizes my earlier point. The line you get in is not a deal breaker. If I was you, given the whole party is USC except you, I would all go in the non EU line.

There have been recent stories at Heathrow about long delays, but that is not about immigrant status/extra checks, its about staffing levels.

The officer at the desk is not different from the one at the other line. As I said before, the worst that could happen is he makes you go to the other line and wait longer, but what purpose could that serve?
Relax and just take it in stride, remember you are British!:thumbup:

Ash UK/US May 19th 2012 5:24 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by Yorkieabroad (Post 10063265)
but at Teesside, even when its just me (UKC) and the kids(USC) they always hold us till all the UKC's have gone thru before they'll even look at us.

Same at Newcastle, even though it was just me and my then 4 year old daughter, because she was non-EU they would not allow her to go through the EU line.

lansbury May 19th 2012 6:03 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by ccalgreen (Post 10070005)
Just to add some missing information, I'm landing at Heathrow. The last time my USC wife and I went, she went to the non-EU line, while I went through the UKC line. When I got to the desk, the officer said that we could have both gone through the UKC line, so I was just curious how broadly the UKBA interprets the definition of "family". I did wait an hour for her last time, but I heard it could be even worse nowadays.

When I was there mostly they would allow a spouse to through the EU line, and if not busy a family with kids. If it was busy they often would request the people to wait until the line had been cleared. The other problem is if the I/O hasn't taken their stamp out to the EU controls they can't deal with non EU passports.

One EU passport holder with 5 or 6 non EU might get refused.

oxonlad May 19th 2012 11:54 am

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by lansbury (Post 10070269)
When I was there mostly they would allow a spouse to through the EU line, and if not busy a family with kids. If it was busy they often would request the people to wait until the line had been cleared. The other problem is if the I/O hasn't taken their stamp out to the EU controls they can't deal with non EU passports.

One EU passport holder with 5 or 6 non EU might get refused.

Just go to the Non-EU line. Might have to wait a bit longer, but much less of a hassle.

Weeze May 19th 2012 12:23 pm

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by Yorkieabroad (Post 10063265)
at Teesside, even when its just me (UKC) and the kids(USC) they always hold us till all the UKC's have gone thru before they'll even look at us.

Oh ffs. Bloody Teesside.

JSL8610 May 19th 2012 11:32 pm

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by Ash UK/US (Post 10070246)
Same at Newcastle, even though it was just me and my then 4 year old daughter, because she was non-EU they would not allow her to go through the EU line.

Yep, I had that at Newcastle too. Just me (UKC) and my wife (with her residence card) and they wouldn't let her in the EU line with me. Not usually a problem, but last time we arrived 5 minutes after an entire plane full of non-EU passengers.

Of course, I stupidly assume it's the same in the US and get told off by the officer for not going through the USC line, as I was travelling with my USC wife.

Jerseygirl May 19th 2012 11:35 pm

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by JSL8610 (Post 10071278)
Yep, I had that at Newcastle too. Just me (UKC) and my wife (with her residence card) and they wouldn't let her in the EU line with me. Not usually a problem, but last time we arrived 5 minutes after an entire plane full of non-EU passengers.

Of course, I stupidly assume it's the same in the US and get told off by the officer for not going through the USC line, as I was travelling with my USC wife.

Same with my daughter's Canadian fiance at Manchester Airport. He was told he shouldn't have used the EU line with the rest of us...and that was Christmas Day morning. Bah humbug.

Yorkieabroad May 20th 2012 10:49 pm

Re: Travelling to UK with American In-Laws
 

Originally Posted by Weeze (Post 10070693)
Oh ffs. Bloody Teesside.

Excuse, me!

What I meant to say was Durham-Tees Valley International Airport!

All irrelevant anyway cos its about to close down if someone doesn't buy it....last time we were thru there were only 3 flights out in the whole day!!


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