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Teaching UK to USA?

Teaching UK to USA?

Old Dec 13th 2017, 4:13 pm
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Default Teaching UK to USA?

My partner is potentially being offered a job in Minneapolis, Minnesotta. I have been teaching in the UK for 5 Years but how do you go about teaching in the US? Would I have to retrain, do they offer schemes? Guidance on government websites isn’t very clear. Thank you!
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 4:29 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Vglads View Post
My partner is potentially being offered a job in Minneapolis, Minnesotta. I have been teaching in the UK for 5 Years but how do you go about teaching in the US? Would I have to retrain, do they offer schemes? Guidance on government websites isn’t very clear. Thank you!
Welcome to BE. You said ‘partner’...are you married...it makes a big difference?
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 4:38 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

It also makes a difference which visa your partner (spouse) will be getting. If H visa, you can't work at all. Other work visas permit you to work after obtaining an EAD.

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Old Dec 13th 2017, 4:53 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Jerseygirl View Post
Welcome to BE. You said ‘partner’...are you married...it makes a big difference?
No, we’re not married, but obviously looking to move together.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 4:57 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Noorah101 View Post
It also makes a difference which visa your partner (spouse) will be getting. If H visa, you can't work at all. Other work visas permit you to work after obtaining an EAD.

Rene
We’d be going on serperate visas as we aren’t married.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 5:05 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Vglads View Post
We’d be going on serperate visas as we aren’t married.
Getting a visa based on teaching as a profession is somewhat difficult, have a search of the forum, there's many posts from people in a similar situation.

Your easiest way to go to the US with your partner is if you get married prior and he/she has a visa that allows you as a spouse to work.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 5:19 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

As above I think the first thing you should do is find out what visa your partner will be on and then decide whether you qualify to work or not.

Then I'd get down to the registry office and get married.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 5:19 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Vglads View Post
We’d be going on serperate visas as we aren’t married.
Chances of getting a visa through teaching are slim to non. Therefore you would be best to think of marriage...but as Noorah said whether you will be allowed to work depends on what visa your husband is getting.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 7:24 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Vglads View Post
We’d be going on serperate visas as we aren’t married.
It will be close to impossible to get a work visa based on teaching. Chances get even less when you're only looking to teach in one particular city.

You probably don't want to hear this, but your best chance of moving as a couple would be to get married and get a derivative of your spouse's visa, and hope its one that allows you to work.

Although I have to say, your opening line of "potentially being offered a job" doesn't sound all that promising to begin with. So really, before you start getting your sights set on teaching in the USA, first find out what visa your partner's potential employer plans to petition for.

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Old Dec 13th 2017, 8:05 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Vglads View Post
We’d be going on serperate visas as we aren’t married.
If you are not married YOU will only be going if you obtain a work visa from a sponsoring employer before you go.

If you marry and your husband is on an H visa then YOU won't be able to work at all. If you marry and he has an L visa then you will be able to work.

Normally, teachers from t he UK need to re-qualify under individual state laws.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 9:28 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Foreign Credential Evaluation
If you trained as a teacher outside the United States or its territories, you may be eligible for a license to teach in Minnesota. Because of significant differences among nations in training and licensure requirements, you will need to submit the following material to a professional evaluation service that has been authorized by the Minnesota Board of Teaching

http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/Lic/out/041256
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 10:44 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

A private or international school would be your best bet. But with such a narrow focus area you are limiting your chances considerably. Public schools (like the U.K. state schools) are unlikely to be in a position to pay the tens of thousands needed in legal fees to bring a teacher from another country. And can you imagine how the taxpayers would react to that when there isn't even enough money for books in many schools? Which subject would it be? Whilst maths and French are the same the world over, the same isn't true for history and geography, for example, which would be taught from an American perspective here. My husband could tell you all about the American civil war, but mention the Tudors and Stuarts and he hasn't a clue.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 11:06 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Twinkle0927 View Post
A private or international school would be your best bet. But with such a narrow focus area you are limiting your chances considerably. Public schools (like the U.K. state schools) are unlikely to be in a position to pay the tens of thousands needed in legal fees to bring a teacher from another country. And can you imagine how the taxpayers would react to that when there isn't even enough money for books in many schools? Which subject would it be? Whilst maths and French are the same the world over, the same isn't true for history and geography, for example, which would be taught from an American perspective here. My husband could tell you all about the American civil war, but mention the Tudors and Stuarts and he hasn't a clue.
Geography? I thought American geography started on the US east coast and finished on the US west coast.
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Old Dec 13th 2017, 11:32 pm
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Originally Posted by Twinkle0927 View Post
..... the same isn't true for history and geography, for example, which would be taught from an American perspective here. My husband could tell you all about the American civil war, but mention the Tudors and Stuarts and he hasn't a clue.
I'd say that they are skill sets that are transferable. It wouldn't take the average educated adult long to be up to speed on American history at a high school level or for the subject specific exams that most states require. (I took the Washington State exam for art, and I managed just fine, despite the switch to more emphasis on art of the Americas and the Pacific). The skills of close reading, looking for patterns, looking for change and continuity, looking for winners and losers, are all transferable.
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Old Dec 14th 2017, 2:07 am
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Default Re: Teaching UK to USA?

Well I love correcting Muricans on their own History over a pint or two at the local brew pub.

Not sure why we are assuming OP has no knowledge of US History.

I do agree otherwise and congratulate on the upcoming nuptials.
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