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Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Old Feb 10th 2007, 4:24 pm
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Default Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Is anyone a sub teacher here? I have been a sub for about six months now and just curious to your opinions, reactions etc. It is interesting. I sub in my son's elementary school - no way will I sub in the High School The kids are funny and take the mickey of my accent and ask questions like "What language do you speak in England!" Tata
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Old Feb 10th 2007, 4:41 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Originally Posted by ukmumsie View Post
Is anyone a sub teacher here? I have been a sub for about six months now and just curious to your opinions, reactions etc. It is interesting. I sub in my son's elementary school - no way will I sub in the High School The kids are funny and take the mickey of my accent and ask questions like "What language do you speak in England!" Tata
I sub in elementary schools in Texas. The kids always ask if I am from France (France seems to be a synonym for "foreign but not Mexican".
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Old Feb 10th 2007, 5:09 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

How did you get your teaching credential? I taught for four years in the UK, but when I came to Los Angeles the California Teacher Credentialling board told me that I'd have to do two years of college here to get my teaching permit.
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Old Feb 10th 2007, 5:18 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Originally Posted by Dante View Post
How did you get your teaching credential? I taught for four years in the UK, but when I came to Los Angeles the California Teacher Credentialling board told me that I'd have to do two years of college here to get my teaching permit.
I had to go through hoops to get my credentials verified The State of Ohio required I use an outside service (World Education Services) to verify my degree transcripts and only then would they consider my application. It cost me nearly $200 to get that done alone At least now if I wanted to get my Masters and become a certified teacher that is done. It must vary by state
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Old Feb 10th 2007, 5:28 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

It does vary from state to state, however, many Catholic schools do not have the same certification requirements as the public (government) schools. You might be able to teach at them without jumping through as many hoops.
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Old Feb 10th 2007, 11:14 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

depends entirely on your state...up in maine, you have to get finger printed and then apply to local school districts and be put on a list stating which subjects you'll be comfortable taking, and then that's it, if your not a tiddy fiddler, they'll call you up, you turn up, get paid a pittance and be a child minder really because the teacher or someone would have provided all the class material etc for you.

Here in mass, it's more ball ache than it's worth, you've got to get certified, finger printed and then officially apply for a job as a sub teacher, you then get put in a list and when a spot comes up, you get a call and then "interview" for that position, if you pass, you get the job for the day, and you keep having to be interviewed....load of shite for slightly better money.
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Old Feb 11th 2007, 9:55 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Originally Posted by ukmumsie View Post
I had to go through hoops to get my credentials verified The State of Ohio required I use an outside service (World Education Services) to verify my degree transcripts and only then would they consider my application. It cost me nearly $200 to get that done alone At least now if I wanted to get my Masters and become a certified teacher that is done. It must vary by state
Degree/masters or no, you would still have to take a high-school equivelancy exam, about 6 hours worth, to prove you passed high school.

They will accept that degrees are OK with credentials checking, but you still have to take the THEA test or similar to enter a teacher's course. High School maths, history, etc etc.

At least, you do in Region 10.
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Old Feb 11th 2007, 10:45 pm
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Default Re: Substitute (supply) teaching in the US

Originally Posted by ali_j View Post
Degree/masters or no, you would still have to take a high-school equivelancy exam, about 6 hours worth, to prove you passed high school.

They will accept that degrees are OK with credentials checking, but you still have to take the THEA test or similar to enter a teacher's course. High School maths, history, etc etc.

At least, you do in Region 10.
Actually, once you've had your UK degree/masters assessed and certified by an approved company, you don't need to take the Highschool Equivalency test or the formal Teacher's Certification in order to supply teach in Region 10.

It's only once you decide that you want to take a full-time teaching position that you need to be certified (ha-ha!).
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