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Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Old May 9th 2013, 12:45 pm
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Default Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Hi there- I am a USC and my stepsons (UKC) will be moving to the US in the fall. I have to contact his school to request transcripts, and other things such as course descriptions etc. I am unsure how the UK works- in the US students with disabilities would some times have an IEP (Individualized Education Program). Students may also go to classes such as resource room, or get other services. I am unsure if he had anything close to an IEP- so how do I phrase it when I talk to the people from his school? I also know that there are perhaps levels in classes or something like that. I can't remember the wording- could someone help explain the special education process, and what types of classes there are - such as levels etc?
I am sorry I can't get more specific about what I want- since I don't know the specific words for things- I am being a bit vague. Maybe another cup of coffee will clear my head!
Thank you!
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Old May 9th 2013, 12:51 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

They do IEP's (same terminology) in the UK.
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Old May 9th 2013, 1:37 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

What do levels mean? I have heard of A level classes I think...
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Old May 9th 2013, 2:00 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by Seal2012 View Post
What do levels mean? I have heard of A level classes I think...
A levels are qualifications which children sit at age 17 or 18.

How old are your stepsons?

For younger children, you may hear terms like 'set' or 'streams' which some schools use to create classes of children with similar ability levels.

You may also hear the term 'statement' to describe an IEP.

Can you not get this information from your stepsons parent in the UK?
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Old May 9th 2013, 3:07 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by rebs View Post
A levels are qualifications which children sit at age 17 or 18.

How old are your stepsons?

For younger children, you may hear terms like 'set' or 'streams' which some schools use to create classes of children with similar ability levels.

You may also hear the term 'statement' to describe an IEP.

Can you not get this information from your stepsons parent in the UK?
The boys are twins and they are currently in their 10th year. My husband who is in the UK (we are doing the immigrant visa) has tried to explain it to me- but since I work in the schools over here- it just starts sounded very complicated and my brain actually shuts down after a while. lol

I think its also difficult for my husband because I keep asking questions that he is unsure of- so before I speak to the boys school- I wanted to try and get an idea about things. The boys are 14 now and will be 15 at the end of August. I had never heard the word "statement" before either. I work in the schools in NYS (I am a speech pathologist- and its hard for me to get this stuff because I keep trying to find the comparison between the US and UK schools but I guess I really won't. I don't think there are any tests similar to a regents over here...
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Old May 9th 2013, 8:44 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

It depends what your son's need are. We have 3 levels of need in the UK school action (initial/low level need), school action plus (more structured support required/outside agency involved) and statement (educational psychology assessment and set objectives from the local authority).
They should have an ie at each of these levels but you often find in high schools there isn't an ie for SA. Also by year 10/11 as they are working towards GCSE's few schools provide additional interventions as the focus is on coursework etc.
Hope that helps a little.
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Old May 9th 2013, 8:46 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Sorry that should say IEP (silly predictive text!).
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Old May 9th 2013, 10:20 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Can't really help, but thought I'd let you know that I switched off the second my eyes noticed you using comic sans as a font....using the default one may or may not increase the advice you get...
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Old May 10th 2013, 11:27 am
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by Bob View Post
Can't really help, but thought I'd let you know that I switched off the second my eyes noticed you using comic sans as a font....using the default one may or may not increase the advice you get...
Thanks for the heads up- but can you explain why? Is it a difficult font to read?
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Old May 10th 2013, 11:32 am
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by Kylidevil View Post
It depends what your son's need are. We have 3 levels of need in the UK school action (initial/low level need), school action plus (more structured support required/outside agency involved) and statement (educational psychology assessment and set objectives from the local authority).
They should have an ie at each of these levels but you often find in high schools there isn't an ie for SA. Also by year 10/11 as they are working towards GCSE's few schools provide additional interventions as the focus is on coursework etc.
Hope that helps a little.
Thank you! That does explain a lot to me- kind of similar to our 504 plan etc. Can you explain to me what exactly the GCSEs are? (I have googled it- but sometimes it is not in layman's terms and the definitions might make sense to someone in the UK but not to me.) How do they choose their GCSE classes? are there special levels of ability in those classes? I know that they don't get a "diploma" but a certificate? Is there a set of GCSEs that indicate you will be college bound, and others that show that you will be learning a trade?
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Old May 10th 2013, 12:12 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by Seal2012 View Post
Thank you! That does explain a lot to me- kind of similar to our 504 plan etc. Can you explain to me what exactly the GCSEs are? (I have googled it- but sometimes it is not in layman's terms and the definitions might make sense to someone in the UK but not to me.)
GCSEs are qualifications that pupils take at the end of year 11 after 2 years of study in a each subject (generally - some pupils do some subjects after a one year course of study).


Originally Posted by Seal2012 View Post
How do they choose their GCSE classes? are there special levels of ability in those classes?
The pupils generally choose which subjects they take to GCSE, but how that choice is made varies by the school. At my son's school (he is in the same year as your stepsons) they had limited choice - most of the subjects were defined for them and compulsory. For example, they had to do one language, but they could choose which language.

Regarding ability levels - again will vary by school. In my son's school only maths is split into classes of differing abilities - all other classes are ostensibly mixed ability. Having said that, he is at an academically selective school so the reasoning there is that the boys are all supposed to be of a similar ability.


Originally Posted by Seal2012 View Post

I know that they don't get a "diploma" but a certificate? Is there a set of GCSEs that indicate you will be college bound, and others that show that you will be learning a trade? [/FONT]
Yes, the qualification that is awarded is a certificate.

GCSEs are not used for college (university in the UK) entrance - that would be A levels. Pupils need the GCSEs to get through to A level study.

Currently, the school leaving age is 16 in the UK, so pupils can do their GCSEs and then leave school. However, that is changing at the moment and ultimately I think the school leaving age is being raised to 18.

I should point out that all of my information is related to English schools. Things are definitely different in Scotland and I think different in Northern Ireland and possibly Wales.
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Old May 10th 2013, 12:19 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

G CSE’s are the examinations that are sat in your chosen subjects by pupils at the end of Year 11. They generally choose their options (subjects) in Year 9, up until this point they will have been taught in most subjects. Some pupils opt to take similar qualifications such as a BTEC which is a more general i.e. media, hair and beauty, engineering. Achievement in any of these is based upon a national marking system.

Most pupils are encouraged to take English and maths GCSE as this is usually required for employment, otherwise options are based upon subjects enjoyed, required for what they want to do in the future or based upon the timetable offered by the school. A lot will depend on area and expectations from the school.

GCSE achievement then paves the way for future qualifications – some pupils may take ‘A’ (advanced) levels (usually to go to University) others may take more general qualifications that lead to employment.
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Old May 10th 2013, 12:32 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by Seal2012 View Post
Thanks for the heads up- but can you explain why? Is it a difficult font to read?
http://mashable.com/2012/10/03/comic-sans-history/

It's just horrid to read, if you're older than 12.
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Old May 10th 2013, 12:43 pm
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Default Re: Special Education in England- IEPs? Terminology?

Originally Posted by Bob View Post
http://mashable.com/2012/10/03/comic-sans-history/

It's just horrid to read, if you're older than 12.
For the older Folks:
That is so strange- I can read it better than other fonts - I am so tired of typing reports, evaluations, and IEPS that are so boring looking! I have decided the bigger font does look a bit garish. Looks like I won't be getting advice from 13 yr olds and up! I can't see your link because my school has blocked it...

Font for 12 yrs and under
That is so strange- I can read it better than other fonts - I am so tired of typing reports, evaluations, and IEPS that are so boring looking! I have decided the bigger font does look a bit garish. Looks like I won't be getting advice from 13 yr olds and up! lol
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