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question for nurses on this forum

question for nurses on this forum

Old Jan 24th 2006, 1:58 pm
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Default question for nurses on this forum

My daughter will be completing her biology degree this December with a 3.7 gpa. I was talking to her yesterday and it seems she is considering doing a masters at the University of Texas in Nursing. I have a friend who was a midwife in the UK and is now nursing in the US, she hates it, saying nurses just don't have the same responsibilities in the US, plus because of the rules over here, she can't do midwifery. If you were a young girl, just about to start a career path in the US, would you consider nursing, knowing what you know now?
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 2:54 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by jjmb
My daughter will be completing her biology degree this December with a 3.7 gpa. I was talking to her yesterday and it seems she is considering doing a masters at the University of Texas in Nursing. I have a friend who was a midwife in the UK and is now nursing in the US, she hates it, saying nurses just don't have the same responsibilities in the US, plus because of the rules over here, she can't do midwifery. If you were a young girl, just about to start a career path in the US, would you consider nursing, knowing what you know now?
Im not a nurse but my wife is....she thinks nursing in the US is utter crap compared to in the UK. There are plenty of hospitals over here where nurses literally are no more than doctors lackeys that are allowed zero responsibility. She did a lot of procedures in the UK that nurses in the US are simply not allowed to do.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 3:22 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by jjmb
My daughter will be completing her biology degree this December with a 3.7 gpa. I was talking to her yesterday and it seems she is considering doing a masters at the University of Texas in Nursing. I have a friend who was a midwife in the UK and is now nursing in the US, she hates it, saying nurses just don't have the same responsibilities in the US, plus because of the rules over here, she can't do midwifery. If you were a young girl, just about to start a career path in the US, would you consider nursing, knowing what you know now?

Why not become a doctor? Takes a lot longer, I know (and costs a bundle), but if she is planning to stay in the US, the rewards are infinitely greater.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 4:02 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by Elvira
Why not become a doctor? Takes a lot longer, I know (and costs a bundle), but if she is planning to stay in the US, the rewards are infinitely greater.
Yup...higher malpractice insurance premiums (about $250,00 a year now I believe), more stress, longer days, higher divorce rate....sounds fantastic.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 4:06 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by Angry White Pyjamas
Yup...higher malpractice insurance premiums (about $250,00 a year now I believe), more stress, longer days, higher divorce rate....sounds fantastic.
$250,000 ... ouch!

In Florida, can't they avoid this insurance as long as they declare it to their patients? Only I saw a certificate saying something like that in two different practices now.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 4:07 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by anotherlimey
$250,000 ... ouch!

In Florida, can't they avoid this insurance as long as they declare it to their patients? Only I saw a certificate saying something like that in two different practices now.
Im not sure to be honest...bit of a gray area. You're always open to a law suit over here. Most hospitals wouldnt employ you without malpractice insurance I know that as then they are open to getting stung.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 4:31 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by Angry White Pyjamas
Im not a nurse but my wife is....she thinks nursing in the US is utter crap compared to in the UK. There are plenty of hospitals over here where nurses literally are no more than doctors lackeys that are allowed zero responsibility. She did a lot of procedures in the UK that nurses in the US are simply not allowed to do.
I remember being in a research study where they mapped my ventricular function using radioactive isotopes. Prior to insertion of a catheter, a senior nurse gave me a couple of injections and drew some blood, about 5 jags altogether. Didn't feel a one of them.

When it came time to insert the catheter, the nurse had to step aside because she wasn't allowed to insert a catheter (NY law, maybe?). Bloody imbecile doctor tore my arm apart trying to get the thing in. Took three attempts. With the other student participating in the study, he screwed up so bad the guys arm was just seeping blood. Both of us were fit to be tied. And you could see the poor nurse was standing there cringing.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 5:50 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by Elvira
Why not become a doctor? Takes a lot longer, I know (and costs a bundle), but if she is planning to stay in the US, the rewards are infinitely greater.
Originally she planned to trained as a doctor but she would be nearly 30 before she really got anywhere with it,plus she wants a life other than studying and as mentioned, medical malpractice makes a lot less attractive profession than years ago. Must admit she vaguely mentioned it a while back but thought she was going more into the research side of things. To honest, not sure if she has the compassion to be a nurse.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 7:31 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by jjmb
My daughter will be completing her biology degree this December with a 3.7 gpa. I was talking to her yesterday and it seems she is considering doing a masters at the University of Texas in Nursing. I have a friend who was a midwife in the UK and is now nursing in the US, she hates it, saying nurses just don't have the same responsibilities in the US, plus because of the rules over here, she can't do midwifery. If you were a young girl, just about to start a career path in the US, would you consider nursing, knowing what you know now?
You need to refresh yourself with all of Rockgurl's posts over the years..
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 7:49 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by jjmb
My daughter will be completing her biology degree this December with a 3.7 gpa. I was talking to her yesterday and it seems she is considering doing a masters at the University of Texas in Nursing. I have a friend who was a midwife in the UK and is now nursing in the US, she hates it, saying nurses just don't have the same responsibilities in the US, plus because of the rules over here, she can't do midwifery. If you were a young girl, just about to start a career path in the US, would you consider nursing, knowing what you know now?
My sister in law has just started nursing on labor and delivery this past year, she enjoys it but then she also said she will be going back to University for another 2 years to become a nurse practitioner in the future.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 8:30 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

OK...let's put it this way. Nursing in the US is pretty crap compared to England in that I have double sometimes triple the workload, and also not to mention all the crap about US hospitals being bloated and unneccesary compared to the NHS. That aside, the positive sides of nursing are that she will never be unemployed, the demand is huge, and the possibilities endless. You can work anywhere in the world, and can earn pretty decent money. If you want to take things to a higher level, then with a degree she can become an APRN (advanced Practice Nurse). They are highly trained, can prescribe, and are invaluable in the ICU. They can command a lot of money also. Becoming a doctor is not comparable because it takes eons to qualify and then you work all the hours God sends. I can pretty much choose my own schedule and can take time off whenever I want because I now work Per Diem at two hospitals, and if I need more money I just work more hours. They NEED me! I know I moan a lot but I do realize how lucky I am. I got a green card straight away and can easily support myself so it can't be that bad!

The single best thing about nursing is that I am free to try any other career I want without having to leave my job because I can work whenever I want, still earn money and yet have enough time to devote to other things. I have a few ideas floating around right now and it's nice to know I can experiment. Flexibility is the key word when it comes to nursing. If I had to say do it or not do it, all I can say is that I am VERY glad and grateful I did nursing in the first place. It transformed my life. God knows where I'd be without it.
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Old Jan 24th 2006, 9:00 pm
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Default Re: question for nurses on this forum

Originally Posted by Rockgurl
OK...let's put it this way. Nursing in the US is pretty crap compared to England in that I have double sometimes triple the workload, and also not to mention all the crap about US hospitals being bloated and unneccesary compared to the NHS. That aside, the positive sides of nursing are that she will never be unemployed, the demand is huge, and the possibilities endless. You can work anywhere in the world, and can earn pretty decent money. If you want to take things to a higher level, then with a degree she can become an APRN (advanced Practice Nurse). They are highly trained, can prescribe, and are invaluable in the ICU. They can command a lot of money also. Becoming a doctor is not comparable because it takes eons to qualify and then you work all the hours God sends. I can pretty much choose my own schedule and can take time off whenever I want because I now work Per Diem at two hospitals, and if I need more money I just work more hours. They NEED me! I know I moan a lot but I do realize how lucky I am. I got a green card straight away and can easily support myself so it can't be that bad!

The single best thing about nursing is that I am free to try any other career I want without having to leave my job because I can work whenever I want, still earn money and yet have enough time to devote to other things. I have a few ideas floating around right now and it's nice to know I can experiment. Flexibility is the key word when it comes to nursing. If I had to say do it or not do it, all I can say is that I am VERY glad and grateful I did nursing in the first place. It transformed my life. God knows where I'd be without it.
Nursing got us our GC's. We have (single) nurse friends who spend a year here, a year there and travel all over the world picking up short term nursing contracts.
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